DQ 2 - Discussion Question 2: How does the author determine...

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Discussion Question 2: How does the author determine what the first equation should be? The first equation is based on the total number of objects. It is usually in the form: x + y = m, where x and y are variables representing the objects in the problem and m is the total number of objects, combined. What about the second equation? The second equation comes from the values of each object, the interest rates of the loans, or other percentages given in the problem (you can think of all of these as "rates"). The sum of the price of each object times the number of objects for each object should equal the total price for the two combined. The sum of the interests for each in the loan problem should equal the total interest, etc. How are these examples similar? In each case, we are given a total value (whether it's the number of packets, the amount of the loans, or the liters of solution). We are also given two components that need to be "mixed" to create a specific end result: for example, different types of seeds or different interest rates. How are they different? These problems come from very different fields -- gardening,
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This note was uploaded on 04/26/2011 for the course MAT 116 taught by Professor Universityofphoenix during the Spring '09 term at University of Phoenix.

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DQ 2 - Discussion Question 2: How does the author determine...

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