Integrating Quotes - NOT ENOUGH CONTEXT: Crooks feels like...

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Integrating Quotes Throughout your essay, when you introduce a quote, your writing flows better if you can make the quote PART OF YOUR OWN SENTENCE. You also need to explain what is happening in the part of the book that the quote appears. This is where the context (sentence before and after) that you typed up can help you. People think Curley’s wife is a tart. Here is an example that shows this. “She ain’t concealin’ nothing” (51). BETTER: People think Curley’s wife is a tart. For example, when the ranch hand Whit is talking to George in the bunkhouse, he says that “She ain’t concealin’ nothing” (51).
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Unformatted text preview: NOT ENOUGH CONTEXT: Crooks feels like he is set apart from the others because of his race. Crooks had retired into the terrible protective dignity of the negro (79). BETTER: Crooks feels like he is set apart from the others because of his race. When Curleys wife insults Crooks, Candy, and Lennie, Lennie acts surprised, but Crooks responds by retiring into the terrible protective dignity of the negro (79). Avoid phrases like:-Here is a quote-This quote shows-This is an example of Instead, introduce your quote with: When _( explain the situation )_, then ( character) says, quote....
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This note was uploaded on 04/27/2011 for the course LIT 113 taught by Professor Howard during the Fall '09 term at Grand Valley State University.

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