logos - major premise to a minor premise to a conclusion....

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–8. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
4/28/11 Persuasive Speaking Ethos: the character of a person; i.e. credibility Constituted by? Trustworthiness Knowledge Dynamism
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
4/28/11 Persuasive Speaking Pathos: emotion Best achieved by? - Detailed stories and descriptions (i.e. “putting a face on it”) - Shocking facts
Background image of page 2
4/28/11 Persuasive Speaking Logos: reason Fallacy: a failure in reasoning that renders an argument invalid
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
4/28/11 Forms of Reasoning Inductive Reasoning: take data and observations about some phenomenon and make a claim based on their pattern This claim is always a generalization , always probabilistic . E.g.: Orchid A has no fragrance. Orchid B has no fragrance… Therefore, it is probable that all orchids have no fragrance. Data conditions? Sufficient and representative. Possible fallacy? Hasty generalization.
Background image of page 4
4/28/11 Forms of Reasoning Deductive Reasoning: work from a general principle to reach a specific conclusion. Known facts and theories are arranged to reveal their implications. Syllogism: a common form that proceeds from a
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 6
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 8
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: major premise to a minor premise to a conclusion. Generally entails taking a major theory and applying it to a particular situation. 4/28/11 Forms of Reasoning Reasoning by Analogy: because we know that A and B have a number of similarities, we can conclude that those things we don’t know about B are likely to resemble their Also probabilistic, not certain. Be sure that similarities outweigh differences. 4/28/11 Forms of Reasoning Causal Reasoning: relating two or more events in such a way as to conclude that one or more of the events caused the A and B occur together and vary together, and because we can discount coincidence and other explanations, A is probably the cause of B. Possible Fallacy? Causal fallacy of confusing sequence with cause. 4/28/11 Forms of Reasoning Some other forms of faulty argument: Bandwagon fallacy Either/or fallacy (a.k.a. false dichotomy) Ad hominem Straw man Red herring...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 04/27/2011 for the course STRC 1111 taught by Professor Raskin during the Spring '11 term at Temple.

Page1 / 8

logos - major premise to a minor premise to a conclusion....

This preview shows document pages 1 - 8. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online