Rhetorical Strategies and Devices

Rhetorical Strategies and Devices - Rhetorical Styles and...

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Rhetorical Styles and Devices
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Three Ways to Persuade Ethos : Arguments that rely on the speaker’s character, and what the audience knows of that character. Because you know me or trust me you will also trust my argument. Pathos : Arguments that appeal to the emotions. If I can make you cry or laugh, you are more likely to accept my arguments. Logos : Arguments that are based on logic and rationality. For instance, to the charge that he corrupts the youth of Athens, Socrates points to all the youth that follow him, and says: “Does anyone willingly allow themselves to be corrupted?”
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Inductive Logic This is the kind of logic we tend to associate with the scientific method, in which we build up to general conclusions based on particular observations. For example, Darwin’s argument for natural selection is built on the basis of thousands of different observations of similar phenomena.
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Deductive Logic Arguing from general premises to arrive at particular conclusions. Plato used deductive logic quite a lot. The following is a classic example: All men are mortal Socrates is a man Therefore, Socrates is mortal
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Alliteration Repetition of the same sound beginning several words in sequence. * Let us go forth to lead the land we love. J.  F. Kennedy, Inaugural  * Veni, vidi, vici.  J ulius Caesar
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Assonance Repetition of the same sound in words close to each other. * Thy kingdom come, thy will be done . From The Lord’s Prayer
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Cacophony Harsh joining of sounds. * We want no parlay with you and your grisly gang who work your wicked will. W. Churchill
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Anadiplosis (“Doubling back”) the rhetorical repetition of one or several words; specifically, repetition of a word that ends one clause at the beginning of the next. * Men in great place are thrice servants:  servants of the sovereign or state;  servants of fame; and servants of  business.  Francis Bacon
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Anaphora The repetition of a word or phrase at the beginning of successive phrases, clauses or lines. * We shall not flag or fail. We shall go on to the end. We shall fight in France, we shall fight on the seas and oceans, we shall fight with growing confidence and growing strength in the air, we shall defend our island, whatever the cost may be, we shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight in the fields and in the streets, we shall fight in the hills. We shall never surrender. Churchill.
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Transposition of normal word order; most often found in Latin in the case of prepositions and the words they control. Anastrophe is a form of hyperbaton. * The helmsman steered; the ship moved 
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This note was uploaded on 04/28/2011 for the course IH 0952 taught by Professor Zhuraw during the Spring '11 term at Temple.

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Rhetorical Strategies and Devices - Rhetorical Styles and...

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