More Fallacies Quiz II

More Fallacies Quiz II - ResultsReporter

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Results Reporter Out of 27 questions, you answered 24 correctly with a final grade of 89% 24 correct (89%) 3 incorrect (11%) 0 unanswered (0%) Your Results: The correct answer for each question is indicated by a  CORRECT From the list below, select the name of the rhetorical device that attacks the arguer instead of  the argument. A) Slippery slope B) Begging the question C) False dilemma D) Ad hominem E) Burden of proof F) Straw man Feedback:  When analyzing an argument, the internal claims—premises—are fair game for attack. The  qualities of the person making the argument are not fair game because they aren't pertinent to the argument 
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itself. CORRECT From the list below, select the name of the rhetorical device that unfairly places the onus of  providing evidence for a position on the wrong side of an issue. A) Slippery slope B) Begging the question C) False dilemma D) Ad hominem E) Burden of proof F) Straw man Feedback:  There are three main categories that provide reasonable grounds for putting the burden of proof on one side  of an issue rather than the other. They are: initial plausibility (the less initial plausibility a claim has, the  greater the burden of proof rests on the person who asserts that claim), affirmative/negative (we usually want  to hear reasons why something  is  the case before we want to hear reasons why it is not), and special  circumstances (in order to ensure that we err on the side of caution or fairness, the burden may be  intentionally placed on the person making the accusation). CORRECT From the list below, select the name of the rhetorical device that ignores an opponent's actual  position and instead presents and attacks a distorted, oversimplified, or misrepresented version  of that position. A) Slippery slope B) Begging the question C) False dilemma D) Ad hominem E) Burden of proof F) Straw man Feedback: This is, arguably, the most frustrating fallacy to combat when it's hurled at you. To stay engaged  in the debate, you must first untangle and correct the distortions, oversimplifications, and misrepresented  versions your opponent is working with. Then, you may proceed with your rebuttal. Of course, all your  opponent has to do is continue creating 'straw men' out of everything you say and you'll remain occupied for  as long as he wants you to be. It is often best to refuse to deal with people who have no qualms about using  this rhetorical technique (if at all possible).
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CORRECT From the list below, select the name of the rhetorical device that limits consideration to only two  alternatives when there are, in fact, more than two. A)
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This note was uploaded on 04/27/2011 for the course COM 120 taught by Professor Dimitri during the Spring '10 term at University of Phoenix.

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More Fallacies Quiz II - ResultsReporter

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