E4 - EXPERIMENT NO. 4 MEASUREMENT OF VISCOSITY OF LIQUIDS...

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EXPERIMENT NO. 4 MEASUREMENT OF VISCOSITY OF LIQUIDS BY CAPILLARY-FLOW METHOD GROUP NO. 2 CABUNGCAL, Ma. Andrea Danita E. ChE -2 / 2008140407 Abstract This Final Report discusses the viscosity of pure liquids, effect of salt concentration on viscosities of aqueous solutions and the temperature effects on viscosity of water. From our data, since our computed experimental value for the viscosity of the liquid samples are close to that of the literature values, we can say that we had successfully achieved our objective for experiment four. In this report, we had also included the formulas, theories and principles behind the variations of the viscosity of a fluid. The data sheet also includes our samples computations to serve as reference for our experimental data. Introduction By the end of this experiment, we were expected to be able to determine the viscosity of a number of normal saturated alcohols by means of an Ostwald viscometer. We used the following liquid samples for studying viscosity: water, ethanol, ethylene glycol, butyl alcohol, on aqueous solutions (salt dissolved in water), and of water at different temperatures. What is Viscosity? Basically, viscosity is a measure of the resistance of a fluid which is being deformed by either shear stress or tensile stress. In everyday terms (and for fluids only), viscosity is "thickness". Simply put, water is "thin", having a lower viscosity, while honey is "thick", having a higher viscosity. Thus, the less viscous the fluid is, the greater its ease of movement (fluidity).
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EXPERIMENT NO. 4 MEASUREMENT OF VISCOSITY OF LIQUIDS BY CAPILLARY-FLOW METHOD GROUP NO. 2 CABUNGCAL, Ma. Andrea Danita E. ChE -2 / 2008140407 Viscosity describes a fluid's internal resistance to flow and may be thought of as a measure of fluid friction. All real fluids have some resistance to stress and therefore are viscous, but a fluid which has no resistance to shear stress is known as an ideal fluid or inviscid fluid. The study of flowing matter is known as rheology, which includes viscosity and related concepts. In general, in any flow, layers move at different velocities and the fluid's viscosity arises from the shear stress between the layers that ultimately oppose any applied force. The relationship between the shear stress and the velocity gradient can be obtained by considering two plates closely spaced at a distance y, and separated by a homogeneous substance. Assuming that the plates are very large, with a large area A, such that edge effects may be ignored, and that the lower plate is fixed, let a force F be
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This note was uploaded on 04/27/2011 for the course CHM 143 taught by Professor Ng during the Spring '11 term at Mapúa Institute of Technology.

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E4 - EXPERIMENT NO. 4 MEASUREMENT OF VISCOSITY OF LIQUIDS...

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