EXPERIMENT 3 - CHM170L/B41/GroupNo.6 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
MAPUA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY School of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry CHM170L / B41 / Group No. 6 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY Experiment No. 3 SURFACE TENSION OF LIQUIDS TAN, Aieocellis F. TANGARA, Neil Patrick P. VELASCO, Christel Charmaine D. VILLAFLOR, Arthur C. ABSTRACT This experiment intends to determine the surface tension of a pure liquid and an aqueous solution, to determine the effect of bulk solute concentration on the surface tension of aqueous solution and to evaluate graphically the parameters of the Gibbs theory. In this experiment, the surface tension of n-butanol was determined by varying the concentration from 0.10 moles per Liter to 0.80 moles per Liter. The result obtained in the experiment is that as the concentration
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
MAPUA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY School of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry CHM170L / B41 / Group No. 6 of n-butanol increases the surface tension decreases. This report will discuss why such a phenomenon occurs. Introduction Surface tension is a phenomenon associated with the interface between a fluid and another phase. The most familiar example involves the water-air interface. If you will observe, molecules on the surface of water are not completely surrounded by fellow water molecules. They are partially surrounded by air on top and partially by water on the sides and bottom. This makes surface water molecules unstable because not all of their hydrogen and oxygen atoms can pair off with suitable atoms unlike the water molecules in the “interior” of the liquid. Here, the water appears to be “thicker” at the surface than elsewhere, producing some special effects. For example, a glass vessel can be overfilled without spilling, and a steel needle can float on water if it is gently lowered to rest on the surface. Within a liquid, each molecule has similar molecules attracting it uniformly in every direction. At the surface, there exists a net attraction toward interior, causing the surface molecules to crowd together. In the absence of other forces, surface tension
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/27/2011 for the course CHM 170 taught by Professor Ng during the Spring '11 term at Mapúa Institute of Technology.

Page1 / 7

EXPERIMENT 3 - CHM170L/B41/GroupNo.6 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online