EXPERIMENT 4 - MAPUA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY School of...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: MAPUA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY School of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry CHM170L / B41 / Group No. 6 Experiment No. 4 M EASURE MENT OF V ISCOSITY OF L IQU I DS BY CAPIL LARY FLOW MET HOD TAN, Aieocellis F. TANGARA, Neil Patrick P. VE LASCO, Christel Charmaine D. V I L LAFLOR, Arthur C. ABSTRACT Principally, the experiment concentrates on the determination of the viscosity of a number of normal saturated alcohols by means of an Ostwald viscometer. Viscosity is a measure of the resistance of a fluid which is being deformed by either shear stress MAPUA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY School of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry CHM170L / B41 / Group No. 6 or tensile stress. In everyday terms, viscosity is "thickness". Thus, water is "thin", having a lower viscosity, while honey is "thick", having a higher viscosity. Viscosity describes a fluid's internal resistance to flow and may be thought of as a measure of fluid friction. Ostwald-Fenske viscometer is the main apparatus used to determine the viscosity of pure liquids, to recognize the effect of salt concentration on viscosities of aqueous solution, and to discern the effects of temperature on viscosity of water. The time of flow (t), density ( ) and a constant for a given viscometer which can be ρ determined through calibration (A) must be gathered to calculate for the viscosity. For the results, the viscosity of pure liquids (ethanol, ethylene glycol and 1-butanol) is 0.00103, 0.0162 and 0.00232, respectively. It has been observed that the higher the molar concentration of salt, the larger the value of the viscosity there is. Alternatively, the higher the temperature, the smaller the value of viscosity there is. The reason for such phenomena shall be explained throughout this report. I nt roduction Viscosity Viscosity is a measure of the resistance of a fluid which is being deformed by either shear stress or tensional stress. Viscosity describes a fluid's internal resistance to flow and may be thought of as a measure of fluid friction. The viscosity of a liquid is related to the ease with which the molecules can move with respect to one another. Thus the viscosity of a liquid depends on the: strength of attractive forces between molecules, which depend on their composition, size, and shape; and the kinetic energy of the molecules, which depend on the temperature. Put simply, the less viscous something is, the greater its ease of movement. All real fluids have some resistance to stress , but a fluid which has no resistance to shear stress is known as an ideal fluid or in viscid fluid. U-tube Viscometers These devices also are known as glass capillary viscometers or Ostwald viscometers, named after Wilhelm Ostwald . Another version is the Ubbelohde viscometer , which consists of a U-shaped glass tube held vertically in a controlled temperature bath. In one arm of the U is a vertical section of precise MAPUA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY School of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 04/27/2011 for the course CHM 170 taught by Professor Ng during the Spring '11 term at Mapúa Institute of Technology.

Page1 / 10

EXPERIMENT 4 - MAPUA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY School of...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online