WK 2 WORKSHOP IN-TEXT CITATIONSVersion 2

WK 2 WORKSHOP IN-TEXT CITATIONSVersion 2 - Do you know...

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Do you know these terms? referencing reference list summary direct/indirect quote database in-text cite/citation quote/quotation long quote quotation marks paraphrase copyright plagiarise /plagiarism to acknowledge
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Referencing Workshop PART 1 The Harvard System and In-text citations Prepared by: the LLA team
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Focus of workshop To review the meaning of plagiarism and how to avoid it. To explain what „referencing‟ means and how „references‟ can be added to your writing. To outline and identify what „in -text citations‟ are & the different forms they can take.
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4 Expectations of Academic Writing It answers a question or addresses an issue. i.e . it is not just a summary of other people‟s ideas. It is unbiased and well informed by creditable research (and hence aims to be convincing). It makes an “original” contribution. The level of originality expected of undergraduates involves originality in terms of: the sources you choose to use the way you use them (i.e. the structure of your arguments) the examples you provide and so on This makes it your work , not just a summary of other people‟s work. It gives “credit where credit is due” for the work of others on which your work is built.
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5 Thus, referencing is required … For your benefit To show the depth and breadth of your research To add authority to your argument To add credibility to your information For the reader’s benefit To enable your reader to more fully appreciate the wider context of your work To allow your reader to use your sources to pursue further research For the benefit of the community To maintain intellectual integrity and basic honesty To avoid plagiarism by showing clearly which ideas and information are yours and which are someone else’s
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Keywords Associated With Plagiarism Cheating Academic dishonesty Copying and pasting Intellectual property theft
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In brief, you plagiarise when you: Use another’s work and do not reference the source, for example: You copy without using quotation marks You summarise without referencing the author‟s name You paraphrase someone else‟s idea without referencing it You use experimental results without referencing where they came from
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This note was uploaded on 04/17/2011 for the course ACCT 220 taught by Professor Mary during the Three '11 term at Queensland Tech.

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WK 2 WORKSHOP IN-TEXT CITATIONSVersion 2 - Do you know...

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