Ch_7_ethics_fundamentals_revised

Ch_7_ethics_fundamentals_revised - 0 Business Ethics...

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1 Business Ethics Fundamentals Revised, Dr. Mayer, MKT351 Chapter 7 0
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2 Introduction to Chapter 7 Business Ethics Public’s interest in business ethics has heightened during the last three decades Public’s interest in business ethics has been spurred by headline-grabbing scandals The scandals of the early 2000s, beginning with Enron, created and defined the “ethics industry” 0
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3 Recent Ethics Scandals Introduction to Chapter 7 Enron WorldCom Arthur Anderson Tyco Adelphia Global Crossing Dynegy HealthSouth Boeing Martha Stewart Parmalat (Italy) Computer Associates Figure 7-1 0
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4 The most egregious violators of business ethics were corrupt executives who protected their own wealth Greed for money and power and a weakening sense of personal values have been behind the recent ethics scandals People define business ethics in broad terms and are concerned with how it has affected them Many participants thought it was possible for executives to be both ethical and successful The media and financial press are not regarded as vigilant watchdogs protecting the public interest The Public’s Opinion of Business Ethics Public Agenda Survey Findings 0
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5 Business Ethics Today versus Earlier Periods Ethical Problem Ethical Problem Society’s Expectations of Business Ethics Actual Business Ethics 1960s Early 2000s Time Expected and Actual Levels of Business Ethics Figure 7-3 0
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6 Chapter 7 Outline I. What is Business Ethics? II. Two Approaches to Business Ethics III. Differences between Law and Ethics IV. Three Models of Management Ethics V. Development of Moral Judgment VI. Sources of a Manager’s Ethical Values VII. Elements of Moral Judgment 0
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7 I. Business Ethics: What Does It Really Mean? Ethics The discipline that examines good or bad practices within the context of moral duty and obligation Moral conduct Relates to principles of right and wrong in behavior Business Ethics Concerned with good and bad or right and wrong behavior and practices that take place in business 0
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8 Descriptive Ethics Involves describing, characterizing and studying morality Focuses on “What is” Normative Ethics Concerned with supplying and justifying moral systems Focuses on “What ought / ought not to be” Rule- or principle-based Developed in Ch. 8 II. Business Ethics: Two Approaches 0
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9 Conventional Approach The conventional approach to business ethics involves a comparison of a decision or practice to prevailing societal norms Decision or Practice Prevailing Norms of Acceptability 0
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This note was uploaded on 04/28/2011 for the course MKT 351 taught by Professor Mayer during the Spring '11 term at Cleveland State.

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Ch_7_ethics_fundamentals_revised - 0 Business Ethics...

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