333 1-24 - Mitch Garrett HIST 333 24 January 2011 Ferdinand's resistance to a popular government could not last forever After less than six years

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Mitch Garrett HIST 333 24 January 2011 Ferdinand’s resistance to a popular government could not last forever. After less than six years, he crumbled and accepted the Constitution of 1812, eight years after it was written. This was not really a choice he could make, but rather by force of several garrisons of the military, pronunciamiento as it came to be known. With the adoption of the new constitution also came a reversal of policies to liberal ideas: expelling Jesuits, abolishing the Inquisition, ending seniorios , and selling church lands to pay of the national debt. In many ways, Spain was moving toward what is now a modern state. Like with the first try for a constitutional monarchy, this second attempt also failed. Eventually the liberals broke into two parties: Moderados and Exaltados. Neither was successful in ruling as King Louis XVIII of France stomped out the last of them in Cadiz on September 30, 1823. As Queen, Maria Christina realized absolutism would not work as a way to rule. So to make
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This note was uploaded on 05/02/2011 for the course HISTORY 333 taught by Professor Ingraham during the Spring '11 term at Saint Louis.

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333 1-24 - Mitch Garrett HIST 333 24 January 2011 Ferdinand's resistance to a popular government could not last forever After less than six years

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