Institut-Handout-Feb 2011 - Pols-454

Institut-Handout-Feb 2011 - Pols-454 - ECON-454 The...

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ECON-454 The European Union: Politics and Political Economy The Institutions of the European Union :
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POLS-454 The European Union: Politics and Political Economy Institutions of the European Union K. Roder Commission Council of Ministers European Parliament European Court of Justice European Economic and Social Committee Committee of the Regions European Central Bank European Ombudsman and others (Handout) K. Roder – Jan. 2011 DECISION-MAKING IN THE EUROPEAN UNION THE COUNCIL PRESIDENCY Membership Heads of Government of the Member States (or Head of State in the case of the French President) and the President of the Commission, often also the Foreign Ministers and one of the Commission Vice-Presidents. The Councils are usually called “summits” because they are meetings at the very highest political level. Role of the Council “The European Council shall provide the Union with the necessary impetus for its development and shall define the general political guidelines thereof” (Article of TEU). Formal meetings of the Heads of Government where introduced in 1975 and are now held at least twice a year. They are usually the place where major new initiatives are launched or outstanding issues resolved. They are often therefore seen as “landmarks” in the development of the EC/EU and have served to provide dynamism and a sense of purpose. 2
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POLS-454 The European Union: Politics and Political Economy Institutions of the European Union K. Roder The European Council also has a key role to play in the formulation of the Common Foreign and Security Policy and the new procedures for Cooperation in the fields of Justice and Home Affairs (the two intergovernmental pillar of the EU). The Member States take it in turn to hold the Presidency for a period of six month, rotating in a fixed order. Ireland held the presidency during the first half of 2004, the Netherlands (Jul-Dec 04), Britain (Jan-June 05), and Luxembourg (Jul-Dec 2005). To try to overcome the disadvantage of having the political leadership of the Union changing ever six month, the previous as well as the succeeding presidency and the presidency holding office make up a – so called - „Troika", which helps to ensure contin T y, however, acts usually only in common on foreign policy matters of the EU. Lisbon Treaty Innovation In addition to the rotating Member State Council Presidencies , MSs also choose a Full Time President of the Council . He or she serves 2 ½ years (renewable once). The president is charged with giving the Union political direction and deal with foreign policy issues at a heads of government level. The European Council, that is the heads of state or government of the member states, "shall elect its President, by qualified majority, for a term of two and a half years, renewable once." The candidate also needs to be approved by the European Parliament. The President "chairs (the Council) and drive its work forward and ensure, at his level, the external representation of the Union." In practice,
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This note was uploaded on 05/02/2011 for the course POLS 454 taught by Professor Roder during the Spring '11 term at Saint Louis.

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Institut-Handout-Feb 2011 - Pols-454 - ECON-454 The...

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