GeorgeUltimateGuide

GeorgeUltimateGuide - George's Ultimate Guide for Lazy...

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George’s Ultimate Guide for Lazy Journalism Students Gathering information: - Learn as much about the subject as you can before you start reporting. - Prepare a set of focused questions. - When you are on the scene, think about action, reaction and observation. Get quotes from everyone possible who might be relevant. And write down all the details that stand out to you – from physical descriptions to actions, gestures and quirks. - Get full names (first and last), ages and contact info for everyone you speak with whether you plan on quoting them or not. - When talking to people, keep asking them for details – make them bring the story to life. - Feel free to stray from your prepared questions (but keep the interview focused). - Have them create a timeline for you so that you have all the exact dates, etc. - Ask, “Why?” - Be nosy. Crafting your lead: - A hard news lead will get straight to the point, but it will not give specifics. The idea is to state the news (what happened to whom and when) without explaining
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This note was uploaded on 05/02/2011 for the course JOURNALISM 1111 taught by Professor Miller during the Fall '10 term at Temple.

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GeorgeUltimateGuide - George's Ultimate Guide for Lazy...

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