Chapter 6 - The Need to Justify our Actions

Chapter 6 - The Need to Justify our Actions - Chapter 6 The...

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02/24/10 Chapter 6: The Need to Justify our Actions Cognitive Dissonance Theory I. CDT: Overview Attitude and Behavior Surveys if I feel strong about something but don’t engage in it, we have a sense of discomfort. Pairs of Cognitions – Festinger (1957) - Relevant or irrelevant to each other - Consonant (one cognitions follows from another. Both are positive. I like my apartmen It is cheap) or Dissonant (opposite. I like him, but he’s lazy) to each other Cognitive Dissonance Defined - Drive or feeling of comfort; results from either o Holding 2 or more inconsistent cognitions or o Performing an action that is discrepant from one’s attitudes (or self-conception Magnitude of Dissonance - The greater the # or the greater the importance of dissonant cognitions = greater dissonance - (We pay A LOT for our apartment and we pay too much, it created greater dissonance - The greater the # or the greater the importance of consonant cognitions = less dissonance Reducing Dissonance
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Chapter 6 - The Need to Justify our Actions - Chapter 6 The...

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