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ECE331_HW1Sol - 2.14 The net potential energy between two...

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2.14 The net potential energy between two adjacent ions, E N , may be represented by the sum of Equations 2.8 and 2.9; that is, Calculate the bonding energy E 0 in terms of the parameters A, B, and n using the following procedure: 1. Differentiate E N with respect to r, and then set the resulting expression equal to zero, since the curve of E N versus r is a minimum at E 0 . 2. Solve for r in terms of A, B, and n, which yields r 0 , the equilibrium interionic spacing. 3. Determine the expression for E 0 by substitution of r 0 into Equation 2.11. Solution (a) Differentiation of Equation 2.11 yields (b) Now, solving for r (= r 0 ) or (c) Substitution for r 0 into Equation 2.11 and solving for E (= E 0 )
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2.18 (a) Briefly cite the main differences between ionic, covalent, and metallic bonding. (b) State the Pauli exclusion principle. Solution (a) The main differences between the various forms of primary bonding are: Ionic --there is electrostatic attraction between oppositely charged ions. Covalent --there is electron sharing between two adjacent atoms such that each atom assumes a stable electron configuration. Metallic --the positively charged ion cores are shielded from one another, and also "glued" together by the sea of valence electrons.
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