Ch 8 Powerpoint (Deviant Behavior - Goode)

Ch 8 Powerpoint (Deviant Behavior - Goode) - SOCI1080...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style  5/1/11 SOCI 1080 Deviant Behavior Illicit Drug Use
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 5/1/11 Positivists (or essentialists) pursue drug questions  primarily through the lens of  causal  speculation  and analysis.  They want to know: Why do persons use drugs? Why do persons abuse drugs? They’re also interested in: Drugs: Positivist Mission
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 5/1/11 Constructionists focus on differential definitions  and cultural  relativity  in defining “drugs” and drug  “problems.”  They note that what constitutes a “drug” and which of  these are socially approved and/or the  circumstances under which use is permitted are  social constructions and vary from culture to  culture or subculture to subculture. Attitudes and policies toward drugs are cued by  Drugs: Constructionist Mission
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 5/1/11 Social problems, like concerns over drug use,  emerge as certain interests (individuals or groups)  aim to bring attention to and/or convince others  that a “threatening” situation exists As with marijuana in the 1930s and LSD in the  1960s, media plays a significant role in  transmitting such messages Social Construction of Drug Problems:  Moral Crusades and Drug “Scares”
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 5/1/11 In strict pharmacological terms, a “drug” is any  mood- or mind-altering substance (which, of  course,  includes a host of substances ranging  from aspirin to birth control measures to alcohol to  cocaine, etc) To the public, “abnormal” use (or “abuse”) may  signal different impressions In our society most definitions revolve around: What is “Deviant” Drug Use?
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 5/1/11 Pharmacologically, drugs can be classified by their  effects on physiological or mental functioning.  Goode offers an exemplary (albeit non-inclusive)  breakdown: Stimulants : speed up signals passing through the  central nervous system Examples: cocaine, amphetamine, methamphetamine,  Ritalin, caffeine Classifying Drugs
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 5/1/11 Sedatives:  induce relaxation, inhibit anxiety, or  (depending on dose) sleep o Examples: barbiturates (like tuinol, seconol, phenobarbitol),  tranquilizers (like valium, xanax, librium), methaqualone Hallucinogens  (or Psychedelics): produce profound  sensory alterations; principal effect is extreme  psychoactivity, loosening of the imagination and  Classifying Drugs
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 5/1/11 Drugs “outside” (or not clearly fitting into) other  classification schemes include: MDMA  (Ecstasy): escalates empathy, or emotional  identification with others Marijuana/Hashish : may  have depressant, stimulant, or  (mildly) hallucinogenic effects Classifying Drugs
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 5/1/11 Ø  Humans have used drugs of one sort or another 
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This note was uploaded on 04/30/2011 for the course SOCI 108 taught by Professor Zhang during the Spring '08 term at Tulane.

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Ch 8 Powerpoint (Deviant Behavior - Goode) - SOCI1080...

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