1080ch10 - Organizational Deviance The term organizational...

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Unformatted text preview: Organizational Deviance The term organizational deviance is typically used to refer to acts (legal or not) committed by workers or employers that violate social norms supported by other employees or the general public and which provoke negative audience reactions. The term organizational crime is used more narrowly to reference acts by workers or employers that violate formal criminal codes. The text chapter considers both. Students of organizational crime may be interested in corporate crime AND/OR what is commonly referenced in media and popular discussion as organized crime (ie, gangland and syndicated crime). Definitively, the difference between the two crime types noted above has to do with the objectives driving the crime: corporate crime is engaged in pursuit of profit from otherwise legal enterprise while organized crime is engaged in pursuit of profit from illegal ventures For all practical intents and purposes, since both pursue objectives by criminal means , they are one in the same* Ch. 10 considers both organizational deviance and organizational crime (but not organized crime) The term "white collar crime" was coined in 1939 during a speech given by Edwin Sutherland to the American Sociological Association. Sutherland defined the term as "crime committed by a person of respectability and high social status in the course of his occupation. He further stated that white collar criminals were from "the upper, white-collar class, which is composed of respectable, or at least respected, business and professional men. Note that the term white collar crime (as opposed to blue collar or working class crime) references occupational status: white collar personnel are relatively respectable, middle to upper class career or professional persons. What distinguishes the commission of white collar crime from that of street and blue collar crime is how an act is executed (ie, the skill, sophistication, and resources of power, influence or respectability for avoiding detection, prosecution, and conviction). Street and blue collar criminals, on the other hand, lack power, influence or respectability and are more frequently caught and subjected to formal sanctioning. In his own writings, Edwin Sutherland used the term white collar crime to refer to both: (1) illegal actions carried out by individual employees to benefit their personal interests (2) illegal actions committed on behalf of businesses and corporations Today, the term occupational...
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1080ch10 - Organizational Deviance The term organizational...

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