{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

1 Muscle copy - MUSCLE PHYSIOLOGY Example of a perfectly...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–10. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
MUSCLE PHYSIOLOGY
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Example of a perfectly formed human being with regard to musculature! :-)
Image of page 2
Muscle Function Definition - An organ whose function is mediating motion. How does muscle provide motion? - Muscle has the ability to shorten. (Cannot lengthen) Eg. - When attached to bones, muscle can cause limbs to move.
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Types of Muscle Skeletal Muscle - Striated in microscope rovides willful voluntary limb motion Smooth Muscle - Non-striated in microscope and provides involuntary motion such as G.I. motility, arteriolar diameter decrease, etc. Cardiac Muscle - Involuntary with characteristics between smooth and skeletal muscle.
Image of page 4
Three Types of Muscle
Image of page 5

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Physiologic Basis of Muscle Shortening How do muscles shorten? - To answer this we will use the reductionist method which is to reduce muscle into progressively smaller levels of anatomic organization until finally we arrive at molecules and explain muscle shortening in terms of molecules. When we have done this we have arrived at the most fundamental explanation.
Image of page 6
Anatomic Level One Whole Organ - Spindle shaped organ whose function is motion. How does it provide motion? - By shortening. This is the explanation of muscle motion at the whole organ level. (Da Vinci’s explanation)
Image of page 7

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Cellular Level Explanation After the invention of the microscope physiologists had to extend Da Vinci’s explanation of muscle motion to the cellular level. A muscle is composed of cells. Now we have to explain muscle motion in terms of cells. Do the cells shorten? ... and if so, how?
Image of page 8
Muscle cells are long which is why a muscle cell is called a muscle fiber. Even though microscopic width wise their length extends to the entire length of the organ usually.
Image of page 9

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 10
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern