3 E-C Coupling copy

3 E-C Coupling copy - Excitation - Contraction Coupling...

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Unformatted text preview: Excitation - Contraction Coupling Control of Muscle Contraction We now know HOW muscles shorten. BUT there is something important still to know. What is it? Hint - Is muscle shortening all the time? Answer- We have to control it. i.e., We have to start it when we want it to shorten and stop it when we dont want it to shorten. This is called Excitation - Contraction (EC) Coupling EC Coupling is basically a question of cellular communication . For skeletal muscle it is communication between the CNS, or motor centers in the brain and the muscle cells . There are two phases to consider: The First messenger (outside of the muscle cell and The Second messenger (inside of the cell) i.e., signal transduction Communication from Brain to Muscle Cell Steps 1. An alpha motor neuron with its cell body in the ventral horn of the spinal cord receives an action potential from the motor center in the brains cortex. 2. The action potential is brought along the alpha motor neuron to a muscle cell and synapses onto it. 3. The neurotransmitter (acetyl choline) binds to receptors on the Motor Endplate of the muscle Fber and brings the message to shorten inside of the cell. the cell....
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3 E-C Coupling copy - Excitation - Contraction Coupling...

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