f10_oct14 - Ast 307 - Oct. 14 , 2010 Formation of the Solar...

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Ast 307 - Oct. 14 , 2010 Formation of the Solar System Some of the moons of the major planets can be considered to be “worlds” in themselves, especially the Galilean satellites of Jupiter . Io: Active volcanoes (the “pizza” moon) • Europa: Possible subsurface water ocean • Ganymede: Largest moon in solar system • Callisto: A large, cratered “ice ball” Yet More Worlds: Jovian moons Major Satellites: Worlds in themselves
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Gas Composition derived from Spectra Surface Composition derived from Spectra The Discovery of the Asteroid Belt Ceres - Jan. 1, 1801 Pallas - 1802 Juno - 1804 Vesta - 1807 Are these new planets? Controversy over this was reminiscent of what happened 200 years later with the discovery of the “10th planet” Eris. Asteroids with Moons Some large asteroids have their own moon, e.g. Ida and Dactyl (left) Why might this be useful to us? Measuring orbit of asteroid’s moon tells us asteroid’s mass Mass and size give us density Some asteroids are solid rock; others just piles of rubble
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A few others are found in two clumps along Jupiter’s orbit, leading/trailing by 60º. These are called the “Trojans.” Asteroid Families Most asteroids orbit in a belt between Mars and Jupiter The Trojan asteroids follow Jupiter’s orbit Orbits of some near-Earth asteroids cross Earth’s orbit, they include the Apollos and Atens A Tale of Comet Tails Close Encounters of the Comet Kind Deep Impact slams Comet Tempel, 2005 Giotto meets Halley,1986
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Where do Comets Come From? Long-Period Comets: an iceball in the Oort Cloud experiences a jolt or perturbation, and starts falling in towards the Sun. The Oort Cloud is a spherical, low-density swarm of small, icy bodies. Halley: An “Intermediate-Period” Comet Meteor, meteorite: what’s the difference? Meteor: flash of light as a small
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This note was uploaded on 04/30/2011 for the course AST 317 taught by Professor Dinerstein during the Fall '10 term at University of Texas.

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f10_oct14 - Ast 307 - Oct. 14 , 2010 Formation of the Solar...

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