Mbpfc10 - OperationsD30 Process Synchronization(Chapter 10...

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1 Process Synchronization (Chapter 10) Plant Synchronization Flow Management Inventory Management Quality Management Human Resource Management Supply Chain Management Information and material flows Process Improvement Continuous Improvement and Reengineering Operations D30 Managing Business Process Flows: Process Integration Module
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2 Processing Network Processing network Information and material flows of » Multiple products » Through a sequence of interconnected processes Goal Satisfy customer demand » in most economical way Produce and deliver Right products, right quantities, right times, right places
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3 Supply Chain Supply chain Network of interconnected facilities » Diverse ownership » Flows of information » Flows of materials
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4 Process Ideal: Synchronization and Efficiency IDEAL process Synchronization of all flows » Ability to meet customer demand in terms of quantity, time, quality, and location requirements 1 x 1 production on demand defect free Lowest possible cost » Total processing cost
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5 Four “Just Rights” of Synchronization Perfectly synchronized process is lean Exactly what is needed Exactly how much is needed Exactly when it is needed Exactly where it is needed Just-in-time (JIT) paradigm Take action only when it is necessary Manufacturing » Produce only necessary flow units in necessary quantities at necessary times
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6 Toyota’s waste elimination in Operations 1. Producing defective products 2. Producing too much product 3. Carrying inventory 4. Waiting to unbalanced workloads 5. Unnecessary processing 6. Unnecessary worker movement 7. Transporting materials
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7 Reducing waste: Increase Problem Visibility Lower the Water to Expose the Rocks Scrap & Rework Missed Due Dates Too Much Space Late Deliveries Poor Quality Machine Downtime Engineering Change Orders Long queues Too much paperwork 100% inspection Inventory
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Inventory as a Measurement of Success INVENTORY LEVEL Scrap Unreliable Vendors Maintenance Lot Sizes Product Design Inventory is a measure of success Inventory Level
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9 Improving Flows in a Plant: Basic Principles of Lean Operations Lean operation’s four ongoing objectives To improve process flows » efficient plant layout, fast & accurate flows To increase process flexibility » reduce changeover time & cross-functional training To decrease process variability » In flow rates, processing times & quality To minimize processing costs » Eliminate non-value adding activities
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Mbpfc10 - OperationsD30 Process Synchronization(Chapter 10...

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