chapter-1 Introduction-student

chapter-1 Introduction-student - CHEMICAL ENGINEERING...

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Text: Smith, Van Ness, and Abbott, “Introduction to Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics”, Seventh Ed., McGraw-Hill, 2004 (REQUIRED) Instructor: Yulin Deng (IPST 375) Tell: 4-5759, email: [email protected] Office Hours: Tuesday: 3:00 - 4:00 PM (IPST 375) (or by appointment) Course Grade: Homework: 25% Exams: Pop Quizzes (6): 15%, Random Tests (2): 30% (October 4th, November 17th) Final Exam: 30% CHEMICAL ENGINEERING THERMODYNAMICS I ChBE 2110 SPRING2005 Lecture: Monday 9:05-9:55 AM Room L1255 ES&T Quizzes, tests and the final exam are open-books and notes. However, you are not allowed to use any standard solutions provided by publishers Several pop quizzes will be given at random times. There are no makeup quizzes if you do not inform me with a good reason in advance.
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Please turn in the homework on time! You cannot copy the solutions from any source! Your will receive zero for the homework if your copy the solution. 10% penalty for late homework. There is no credit if the solutions are posted, except in serious situations. Class attendance: 90% attendance rate is required. The attendance may be taken randomly. If your attendance is less than 90%, you will receive 5 points deduction. Grades: A: >90% B: >80% C: >70% D: >60% F < 60% (the cutoffs may change a little bit based on the curves) TA: Justin Vaughn Email: [email protected] Office: 464 BH (Bunger Henry) Phone: Office Hour: Wednesday from 3:30-4:30 PM TA-2: Swetha, Rathan Email: [email protected] Phone: 801-664-2865 Office: Wing 2A, IBB Building T-Square: Notes, assignments, solutions, tests, curves of the grades
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What does the course look like? The course is not too easy Too many equations! Too much mathematics! (Fortunately, they are not too difficult) Too many examples! Why do we study thermodynamics: Everything has to follow the thermodynamic law Burning coal- Running a car – Eating foods - Energy from the sun - The science concerns with the relations between heat and mechanical work, and the conversion of one into the other Heat to work: electric power plant; Turbojet engine Work to heat: Refrigerator
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What is thermodynamics Thermodynamics: It teaches us what can and what cannot happen: Can the reaction C + O 2 – CO 2 spontaneously happen at room temperature? Can 2H 2 +O 2 - 2H 2 O spontaneously happen? Can heat transfer from cool reservoir to hot reservoir without affecting the surrounding? Can colloid particle suspension stable forever? It teaches us how the heat, work and energy are converted from one to another What is the conversion efficiency? What is the effect of the system to surrounding? but It cannot teach us the kinetics of reactions If the reaction C + O 2 – CO 2 can happen at room temperature, how fast? If a colloid suspension (such emulsion) is unstable, when will it precipitate?
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This note was uploaded on 05/01/2011 for the course CHBE 2110 taught by Professor Gallivan during the Spring '08 term at Georgia Tech.

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chapter-1 Introduction-student - CHEMICAL ENGINEERING...

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