Ch02_Outline

Ch02_Outline - CHAPTER 2 SKETCHING AND TEXT INTRODUCTION Sketching is an important method of quickly communicating design ideas therefore learning

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CHAPTER 2 SKETCHING AND TEXT INTRODUCTION Sketching is an important method of quickly communicating design ideas; therefore, learning to sketch is necessary for any person working in a technical field. Sketching is as much a way of thinking as it is a method of recording ideas and communicating to others. Most new designs are first recorded using design sketches. This chapter introduces you to sketching techniques. Later chapters show you how to take your sketched design ideas and formalize them in models or drawings that can be used in analysis and manufacturing. Lettering is part of sketching and drawing. Before CAD, lettering had much more emphasis in engineering and technical graphics. Now it is no longer necessary to spend hours working on lettering technique. CAD systems offer the user many different typestyles that can be varied in a number of ways. 2.1 TECHNICAL SKETCHING It is important to emphasize to the students the role that sketching plays in the engineering design process and how technical sketching differs from other types of sketching, such as those used in the fine arts. Many students have the mistaken impression that since sketching is less precise than manual drafting or CAD, it is less important. They don't realize that good sketching is an acquired skill and just because sketching is less precise doesn't mean that it should be sloppy or confusing. It may be worth noting that in many applications, technical sketches are required to follow the same graphics conventions that are imposed on formal drafted or CAD-produced drawings. 2.1.1 FREEHAND SKETCHING TOOLS Note that though sketches can be created with any kind of drawing instrument on most any kind of paper, a good quality pencil and paper will help a beginning student. The instructor will have to decide his/her policy on the use of grid paper . Some feel it is a great way to support orthogonal and isometric line sketching in beginning (or advanced) students, but others feel it becomes a crutch which prevents them from becoming proficient on plain paper. The same decision goes for the use of tracing paper . Another important issue is the use of straight edges. Students feel a tremendous need to produce that 'perfect' line. It is the opinion of this author that when you start using a straight edge, it is no longer a true sketch and you have lost much of the speed and flexibility advantage of sketching. 2.2 SKETCHING TECHNIQUE Students will come to your class with truly diverse abilities to mentally create and manipulate graphic imagery ( visualization ). Either through their life experiences or through innate ability, some students are simply better at visualization than others. This does not mean that those who don't come to your class with strong skills can't be taught many of the skills presented in the text. What it does mean is that it will be worth your while to try to informally assess your student's visualization abilities, either through exercises presented in this chapter,
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Ch02_Outline - CHAPTER 2 SKETCHING AND TEXT INTRODUCTION Sketching is an important method of quickly communicating design ideas therefore learning

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