Mesostigmata Lekveishvili&Krantz

Mesostigmata Lekveishvili&Krantz - Systematic...

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Systematic & Applied Acarology Special Publications (2004) 20, 1–4 1 © 2004 Systematic & Applied Acarology Society ISSN 1461-0183 A new genus of the family Sejidae (Acari: Mesostigmata) based on Sejus krantzi and S. manualkrantzi Hirschmann, 1991 MARIAM LEKVEISHVILI 1 & GERALD W. KRANTZ 2 1 Acarology Laboratory, Museum of Biological Diversity, Ohio State University, 1315 Kinnear Rd., Columbus, OH 43212- 1192, USA e-mail: [email protected] 2 Department of Zoology, Oregon State University, Cordley 3029, Corvallis, OR 97331-2914, USA e-mail: [email protected] Abstract Sejus manualkrantzi (Acari: Mesostigmata: Sejidae) is synonymized with S. krantzi and is assigned to a new genus, Adenosejus . Key words: Sejus , Adenosejus , krantzi , manualkrantzi In a recent revisionary work, Hirschmann (1991) synonymized the sejine genera Epicroseius (Berlese 1905), Zuluacarus (Trägårdh 1906) and Willmannia (Trägårdh 1906) under the genus Sejus Koch, 1836, described or redescribed 26 species of the newly constituted genus (Hirschmann et al . 1991), and assigned the resulting 44 recognized species to ten species groups (Hirschmann, 1991). Among the new species were S. krantzi and S. manualkrantzi , both described solely based on illustrations taken from "A Manual of Acarology" (Krantz, 1978). These illustrations, referred to in the Manual as " Sejus sp. (Oregon, USA)", were intended only to provide a typical habitus for the family Sejidae, and include drawings of the dorsum of the female (Fig. 12-1) and male (Fig. 12-2), types of dorsal setae (Fig. 12-3), the venter of the female (Fig. 12-4) and the epigynal shield (Fig. 12-5) (page 170). There was no accompanying species description. As a result of studying the drawings of the venter and dorsum of the female, Hirschmann found characters that "were not matching". For example, he noted that the shape of the venter is oval while the dorsum is pear- shaped. He also noted a difference in the number of posteromarginal setae: the venter has 6 and the dorsum has 4 setae. Hirschmann also concluded that peritrematic shields are absent, and that the crateriform structures on the lateral margins of the ventrianal shield represent the bases of missing setae. Based on these observations Hirschmann described Sejus krantzi from the drawing of the female venter (Fig. 12-4 in Krantz, 1978) and S. manualkrantzi from the drawing of the female dorsum (Fig. 12-1 in Krantz, 1978). He then placed these two entities into two different species groups: S. manualkrantzi , with S. solaris in the "solaris" group and S. krantzi with S. posnaniensis and Willmannia sejiformis in the "posnaniensis" group (Hirschmann, 1991). Given Hirschmann's proclivity for using the "Gangsystematik"
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