lecture.australianz_nxpowerlite

lecture.australianz_nxpowerlite - Food Science 470 Wine...

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Food Science 470 Wine Appreciati on Dr. Christian E. BUTZKE Associate Professor of Enology Department of Food Science www.fs470.org
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World Viticulture 50º 68ºF 50ºF 50ºF 68ºF   0º 50º
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Government of Victoria www.vic.gov.au
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  History   Geography   Statistics   Growing areas   Grape varieties
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The Romans –  again!
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AUS/NZ History   1642   Dutch explorer Abel  Tasman  “discovers” NZ   1770   James  Cook  “discovers” New South Wales   1788   First vineyards near Sydney (NSW)   1833   James  Busby  brings in 20,000+ cuttings              of 570 European varieties to AUS   1835   George  Darwin  reports vineyards in NZ   1839   German geologist Johannes  Menge  suggests              Barossa Valley as top growing area
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Topography
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 Wine is AUS’s 3rd largest export product  Contributes $6 billion to AUS economy
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A lot of people in this country pooh-pooh Australian table wines. This is a pity as many fine Australian wines  appeal not only to the Australian palate but also to the cognoscenti of Great Britain. Black Stump Bordeaux is rightly praised as a peppermint-flavored Burgundy, whilst a good Sydney Syrup can  rank with any of the world's best sugary wines. Château Blue, too, has won many prizes; not least for its taste, and its lingering afterburn. Old Smokey 1968 has been compared favourably to a Welsh claret, whilst the Australian Wino Society  thoroughly recommends a 1970 Côte du Rod Laver, which, believe me, has a kick on it like a mule: 8 bottles of  this and you're really finished. At the opening of the Sydney Bridge Club, they were fishing them out of the main  sewers every half an hour. Of the sparkling wines, the most famous is Perth Pink. This is a bottle with a message in, and the message is  'beware'. This is not a wine for drinking, this is a wine for laying down and avoiding. Another good fighting wine is Melbourne Old-and-Yellow, which is particularly heavy and should be used only for 
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lecture.australianz_nxpowerlite - Food Science 470 Wine...

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