GENEL - 2.0 INTRODUCTION In this experiment our aim is to...

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2.0 INTRODUCTION In this experiment our aim is to find viscosity of aqueous glycerol solution at different temperatures and concentration. At the end of the experiment, we are able to find viscosities with different measurement techniques which are capillary flow method, falling ball method and rotating shaft method. While discussing the results we will decide which method is the best for our different aqueous solutions. Three different techniques are discussed below. 2.1 Capillary-Flow Method (The Ostwald-Fenske Viscometer) : In order to determine viscosity of liquid by capillary flow method, we use Hagen-Poiselle equation. We measure the time necessary of the fluid flow between two marks in capillary tube with driving forces which is head pressure of the liquid. Capillary Viscometer is widely used to measure the viscosity of Newtonian fluids. However we can also use non - Newtonian fluids by applying external pressure to the fluid. We can use the equations below for calculations of this method. dV / dt = (πr 4 .∆P) / (8.µ.L) µ = (πr 4 .∆P) * (t / 8.V.L) (Assuming .∆P is constant) µ = (πr 4 .ρgh.t) / (8VL) =A.ρ.t (Since ∆P = ρgh) 2.2 Falling Ball Method (HOEPPLER) : The relationship between viscosity of a Newtonian fluid and velocity of the falling sphere is studied in Stoke’s law. In general viscous fluid is used in falling ball method. Difference between density of ball and liquid should be small in order to get
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This note was uploaded on 05/01/2011 for the course CHE che 320 taught by Professor Ahmetarslan during the Spring '11 term at Middle East Technical University.

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GENEL - 2.0 INTRODUCTION In this experiment our aim is to...

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