genetics help me!!! - Lecture 2 Mitosis and Meiosis...

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Lecture 2 – Mitosis and Meiosis Chromatin Allele Centriole Spindle fibers Homologous chromosomes Chromatids Cell cycle Interphase Mitosis Karyokinesis Cytokinesis Prophase Metaphase Anaphase Telophase Meiosis Tetrad Crossing over Chiasma Law of Independent Assortment Nondisjunction Know events in the four steps of Mitosis Know events in the four steps of Meiosis I and Meiosis II Concepts check: 1. List three differences between meiosis and mitosis. 2. Somatic cells from Odocoileus virginianus (white-tailed deer) have 70 chromosomes and contain approximately 3.48 picograms (pg) of nuclear DNA. a. What is the gametic number (N)? b. In the following table, fill in the blanks for the number of chromosomes, the number of chromatids and the amount of nuclear DNA (pg) that are found in each cell at the following stages: 2. Below is an illustration of Meiosis I and II. a.Label each phase of cell division. b.Indicate paternal and maternal chromosomes and chiasmata formation. c. What is the diploid number of this cell? The haploid number? Stage of cell division # chromosomes # chromatids Amount of nuclear DNA (pg) End of Mitosis End of Meiosis I End of Meiosis II Lecture 3 – Mendelian Genetics Genotype
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Phenotype True-breeding Monohybrid cross Principle of Dominance Recessive trait Dominant trait Reciprocal cross Principle of Segregation (Mendel’s First Law) Homozygote Heterozygote Punnett Square Testcross Dihybrid Cross Principle of Independent Assortment (Mendel’s Second Law) Product Law Sum Law Null hypothesis Chi-square analysis Degrees of freedom Pedigree analysis Autosomal recessive trait Autosomal dominant trait Know the crossing terminology: P, F1, F2. A diploid organism can have, at most, how many alleles of a particular gene? Compare and contrast Mendel’s First and Second Laws. What do they state or mean? What is a testcross used for? If the progeny of a testcross are 50% dominant “A” phenotype and 50% recessive “a” phenotype, what can you conclude about the phenotype of the unknown parent? Know how to apply the rules of probability (the product and sum rule). For example, in the following cross: AaBb x Aabb, apply the rules of probability to calculate the proportion of progeny that will be A-bb. For the trihybrid cross: AABbcc x AabbCC, what is the proportion of progeny that will be A-bbCc? Know how to set up a Punnett square and determine genotypic and phenotypic ratios of genetic crosses. Know how to apply and interpret a Chi-Square Test. For example, in the testcross AaBb x aabb, you obtain the following progeny data: 95 A-B- 102 A-bb 105 aaB- 98 aabb You hypothesize that the genes assort independently. If this is the case, you would expect a ?__________ ? ratio of the four phenotypic classes. Do these results differ significantly from what you expected? What is the probability (p) value?
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Lecture 4 – Extensions to Mendelian Genetics Allele Polymorphic locus Wild-type allele Mutation Null allele Incomplete dominance Threshold effect
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This note was uploaded on 05/02/2011 for the course FNR 305 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at Purdue University-West Lafayette.

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genetics help me!!! - Lecture 2 Mitosis and Meiosis...

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