SIO40lecture20

SIO40lecture20 - SIO 40 Life and Climate on Earth Nov 19...

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SIO 40 – Life and Climate on Earth Nov 19 2010 Lecture 20 - Ocean Acidification and Warming polar pteropod cold-water coral
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Observed and expected ocean climate change The ocean’s climate will be altered in important ways by the large-scale increases in CO 2 in the atmosphere as a result of human activities. The ocean’s heat content will rise significantly as waters warm up. In addition, as the ocean takes up more and more CO 2 from the atmosphere, seawater pH will decrease.
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Changing ocean heat content, 0-700 m Another change in the ocean environment expected as a result of global warming is warming of the oceans. This graph shows how the heat content of the oceans has already increased in the layer extending from the surface to 700 m depth, according to several different studies. We know that thermal expansion of seawater due to heating has already caused a measurable increase in sea level. Warming of the oceans will also have important consequences for ocean ecosystems.
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Positive climate feedback loops – ocean pumps The effectiveness of the oceanic carbon pumps first discussed in lectures 11 and 12, the biological pump for organic carbon and the inorganic solubility pump, is likely to decrease in a warming world. For the solubility pump this is because CO 2 is less soluble in warmer water, and for the biological pump this is because reduced upwelling in warm, stratified oceans will lead to less algal growth. Note: recent findings show that these effects are already taking place, increasing the fraction of emitted CO 2 that remains in the atmosphere and exacerbating the greenhouse effect.
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Is ocean warming causing jellyfish populations to explode? Evidence suggests that there is a linkage, but ultimately jellyfish populations are a function of more than just temperature. Eutrophication (excess nutrients) and overfishing also play a role.
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Recommended background reading, posted as pdf on class website Article from Scientific American , 2006
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2 is increasing in the atmosphere…. . Where else is anthropogenic CO
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This note was uploaded on 05/02/2011 for the course SIO 40 taught by Professor Barbeau,k during the Fall '08 term at UCSD.

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SIO40lecture20 - SIO 40 Life and Climate on Earth Nov 19...

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