Albert_Camus_-_The_Fall - Albert Camus The Fall THE FALL A...

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Albert Camus ± The Fall 1 THE FALL A Novel by ALBERT CAMUS Translated by JUSTIN O’BRIEN VINTAGE BOOKS A Division of Random House NEW YORK
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Albert Camus ± The Fall 2 © Copyright, 1956, by Alfred A. Knopf, Inc. All rights reserved under International and Pan-American Copyright Conventions. Published in New York by Random House, Inc., and in Toronto, Canada, by Random House of Canada, Limited. Library of Congress Catalog Card Number: 57-5652 ISBN 0-394-70223-9 Originally published in France as La Chute . Copyright, 1956, by Librairie Gallimard Reprinted by arrangement with Alfred A. Knopf, Inc. MANUFACTURED IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
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Albert Camus ± The Fall 3 Some were dreadfully insulted, and quite seriously, to have held up as a model such an immoral character as A Hero of Our Time; others shrewdly noticed that the author had portrayed himself and his acquaintances. … A Hero of Our Time , gentlemen, is in fact a portrait, but not of an individual; it is the aggregate of the vices of our whole generation in their fullest expression. —LERMONTOV
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Albert Camus ± The Fall 4 The Fall
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Albert Camus ± The Fall 5 M AY I, monsieur, offer my services without running the risk of intruding? I fear you may not be able to make yourself understood by the worthy ape who presides over the fate of this establishment. In fact, he speaks nothing but Dutch. Unless you authorize me to plead your case, he will not guess that you want gin. There, I dare hope he understood me; that nod must mean that he yields to my arguments. He is taking steps; indeed, he is making haste with prudent deliberation. You are lucky; he didn’t grunt. When he refuses to serve someone, he merely grunts. No one insists. Being master of one’s moods is the privilege of the larger animals. Now I shall withdraw, monsieur, happy to have been of help to you. Thank you; I’d accept if I were sure of not being a nuisance. You are too kind. Then I shall bring my glass over beside yours. You are right. His silence is deafening. It’s the silence of the primeval forest, heavy with threats. At times I am amazed by his obstinacy in snubbing [4] civilized languages. His business consists in entertaining sailors of all nationalities in this Amsterdam bar, which for that matter he named—no one knows why— Mexico City . With such duties wouldn’t you think there might be some fear that his ignorance would be awkward? Fancy the Cro-Magnon man lodged in the Tower of Babel! He would certainly feel out of his element. Yet this one is not aware of his exile; he goes his own sweet way and nothing touches him. One of the rare sentences I have ever heard from his mouth proclaimed that you could take it or leave it. What did one have to take or leave? Doubtless our friend himself. I confess I am drawn by such creatures who are all of a piece. Anyone who has considerably meditated on man, by profession or vocation, is led to feel nostalgia for the primates. They at least don’t have any ulterior motives. Our host, to tell the truth, has some, although he harbors them deep within him. As a result of
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This note was uploaded on 05/03/2011 for the course ECONOMIC 12 taught by Professor Jj during the Spring '11 term at Eastern Mediterranean University.

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Albert_Camus_-_The_Fall - Albert Camus The Fall THE FALL A...

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