A View of Hamlet - A View of Hamlet 1. The tragedy of...

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A View of Hamlet 1. The tragedy of Hamlet is that Hamlet has a revengeful nature that ultimately leads to his demise, because of his irresolute nature. This is expressed during his soliloquy when he met Fortinbras and his army. a. IV.iv. 59-68 (p.203-205) Hamlet to himself. “How stand I, then, That have a father killed, a mother stained, Excitements of my reason and my blood, And let all sleep, while to my shame I see The imminent death of twenty thousand men That for a fantasy and trick of fame Go to their graves like beds, fight for a plot Whereon the numbers cannot try the cause, Which is not tome enough and continent To hide the slain? O, from this time forth My thoughts be bloody or be nothing worth!” 2. Theme: Having a revengeful nature, but lacking the inability to act on your revenge can lead to your ultimate demise. 3. Harmatia: Hamlet’s weakness is that he wants to seek revenge for his father’s death, but his good nature prevents him from acting on it and ultimately leads to his own death.
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4. Rationale: a. The root of Hamlet’s anger is that his uncle murdered his father and wedded his mother. i. I.x.49-59 (p. 59) Ghost of King Hamlet to Hamlet. “Ay, that incestuous, that adulterous beast,
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This note was uploaded on 05/03/2011 for the course ENG 316K taught by Professor Kruppa during the Spring '08 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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A View of Hamlet - A View of Hamlet 1. The tragedy of...

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