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Gas Laws ir is like money; it’s no big deal, i.e.  until you run out of it 
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Elements that exist as gases at 25 0 C and 1 atmosphere
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Gases uniformly fill any container Gases are the most compressible state of matter. Gases will mix evenly and completely when confined to the same  container. Gases have much lower densities than liquids and solids. Physical Characteristics of Gases
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Properties of Gases You can predict the behavior of gases based on the following  properties: Pressure Volume Amount   (moles) Temperature    (measured in Kelvin, K)
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Pressure Pressure  is defined as the force the gas exerts on a given area of the  container in which it is contained.  The SI unit for pressure is the Pascal, Pa. Pressure  =  force area force = collisions of particles Units of Pressure 1 atm = 760 mmHg         1 atm = 29.92 in Hg            = 760 torr                    = 14.7 lb/in 2  (psi)           = 101,325 Pa
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Barometer Measuring Atmospheric Pressure Mercury filled column  inverted in dish of mercury Mercury in the column flows out of  tube until its pressure is equal to  the pressure of the air exerted on  the mercury in dish. 760  mmHg (Torricelli)
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How to Increase Gas Pressure The pressure that a gas exerts depends on how often and how hard  these molecules strike the walls of the container. Increasing  temperature causes molecules to  move faster  and  collide more frequently  and with  more energy and so gas pressure increases.   Decreasing  volume also leads to an  increase  in gas pressure as molecules now  collide more frequently with the walls of the container. Molecules  collide more often = increase in gas pressure  Molecules  collide with more energy = increase in gas pressure.
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Boyle’s Law Boyle’s Law describes the relationship between  pressure (P) and volume (V) of gases. Boyle determined that for the same 
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This note was uploaded on 05/04/2011 for the course CHEM 211 taught by Professor Kelly during the Spring '11 term at University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign.

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