1.2 lecture02

1.2 lecture02 - Properties of Probability STAT 1301...

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1 STAT 1301 Lecture 2 Properties of Probability For any event A , P( A c ) = 1 - P( A ). If A B , then P( A ) P( B ). For any two events A and B For any two events and , P( A B ) = P( A ) + P( B ) - P( A B ). For three events, A , B , and C , P( A B C ) = P( A ) + P( B ) + P( C ) - P( A B ) - P( A C ) - P( B C ) + P( A B C ). Equally Likely Outcomes For many experiments it is natural to assume that all outcomes in the sample space are equally likely to occur. If there are N ( ) possible equally likely outcomes, then the probability assigned to each is 1/ N ( ). If an event A consists of N ( A ) outcomes. Then P( A ) = N ( A ) / N ( ). Example Three dice are rolled and their scores added. Are you more likely to get 9 than 10, or vice versa? This problem was solved by Galileo Galilei before 1642. A quick answer
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This note was uploaded on 05/04/2011 for the course STAT 1301 taught by Professor Smslee during the Spring '08 term at HKU.

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1.2 lecture02 - Properties of Probability STAT 1301...

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