The White Castle

The White Castle - Patricia Abrudan The idea of human...

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Patricia Abrudan The idea of human beings as pairs is a predominant theme throughout Pamuk's The White Castle . It seems rather ambiguous and confusing at times but there is important emphasis on the presence of a doppelganger because it is crucial to the story's theme of existentialism. Pamuk's storyline is easy to read but holds a deeper understanding in-between the lines. It may be cliche but many people, even today, say that everyone has a double somewhere else in the world. This view is illustrated in the book when the narrator says “human beings were created in pairs, hyperbolic examples on this theme were recalled, twins whose mothers could not tell them apart, look-a-likes who were frightened at the sight of one another but were unable as if bewitched, ever again to part, bandits who took the names of the Innocent and lived their lives.” Pamuk took this idea and developed it into a story of two people who meet, from completely different backgrounds, but who look very much alike. These two individuals are the narrator and his master Hoja. At first, it seems that they are two
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This note was uploaded on 05/04/2011 for the course PHL 180A taught by Professor Miller during the Fall '10 term at Miami University.

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The White Castle - Patricia Abrudan The idea of human...

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