Thus Spoke Zarathustra

Thus Spoke Zarathustra - 09/12/2010 Patricia Abrudan Thus...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
09/12/2010 Patricia Abrudan Thus Spoke Zarathustra is written like a story. Even so, the reader is implicitly being lead to two of Nietzsche’s prominent ideas. Reading “Zarathustra’s Prologue” and “On the Three Metamorphoses” one can already sense these ideas. The two themes that Nietzsche emphasizes in the beginning of this book include the idea that “god is dead” and the concept of the overman. What Nietzsche is trying to say about these ideas isn’t told straightforward but must be extrapolated from the information he does give. Many things occur in the beginning of this book that could elicit further discussion of Nietzsche’s beliefs and ideas. For example, when reading about the tightrope walker one must read between the lines in order to understand what it truly represents. Nietzsche states that “Man is a rope between beast and overman.” He may have meant to have humanity represented by this story. For example, the tightrope walker when he began walking on the rope was representing the slow and dangerous human development from a simple contempt beast to a vocational overman. Nietzsche calls humans
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 05/04/2011 for the course PHL 180A taught by Professor Miller during the Fall '10 term at Miami University.

Page1 / 2

Thus Spoke Zarathustra - 09/12/2010 Patricia Abrudan Thus...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online