biol_119__lecture_5__9-11-09

Biol_119_lecture_5_ - Lecture 5 Finishing up echinoderms before moving on to Chapter 34 and the Vertebrates Complete metamorphosis features a

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Lecture 5, September 11, 2009 Finishing up echinoderms before moving on to Chapter 34 and the Vertebrates
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Complete metamorphosis features a larval stage that looks different from the adult, True or False
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The radial appearance of most adult echinoderms is the result of a secondary adaptation to a sessile lifestyle. Their larvae are clearly bilateral and even echinoderm adults are not truly radial in their anatomy.
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Sea Stars Sea stars have multiple arms radiating from a central disk The undersurfaces of the arms bear tube feet, each of which can act like a suction disk (a) A sea star (class Asteroidea) Figure 33.40a
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Brittle Stars Brittle stars have a distinct central disk and long, flexible arms (b) A brittle star (class Ophiuroidea) Figure 33.40b
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Sea Urchins and Sand Dollars Sea urchins and sand dollars have no arms but they do have five rows of tube feet that function in movement (c) A sea urchin Figure 33.40c
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Sea Lilies and Feather Stars Sea lilies live attached to the substrate by a stalk Feather stars crawl about using their long, flexible arms (d) A feather star Figure 33.40d
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Sea Cucumbers Upon first inspection do not look much like other echinoderms Lack spines, and their endoskeleton is reduced but they do have five rows of tube feet (e) A sea cucumber (class Holothuroidea) Figure 33.40e
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Sea Daisies Sea daisies were discovered in 1986 And only two species are known (f) A sea daisy Figure 33.40f
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B. Chordates Phylum Chordata Bilaterally symmetric animals with segmented bodies Consists of two subphyla of invertebrates as well as the hagfishes and the vertebrates Chordates share many features of embryonic development with echinoderms
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What characteristic(s) do echinoderms and chordates share that account for their being grouped together? A. pentaradial symmetry B. a water vascular system C. 18s RNA sequence similarity D. protostome development E. A, B and C are shared by both phyla
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A summary of animal phyla
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Chapter 34 Vertebrates
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Overview: Half a Billion Years of Backbones By the end of the Cambrian period, some 540 million years ago an astonishing variety of animals inhabited Earth’s oceans One of these types of animals gave rise to vertebrates, one of the most successful groups of animals. There are approximately 52,000 species of vertebrates which include the largest organisms ever to live on the Earth The animals called vertebrates get their name from vertebrae, the series of bones that make up the backbone
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Concept 34.1: Chordates have a notochord and a
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This note was uploaded on 05/04/2011 for the course BIO 119 taught by Professor O'donnellandspear during the Spring '07 term at SUNY Geneseo.

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Biol_119_lecture_5_ - Lecture 5 Finishing up echinoderms before moving on to Chapter 34 and the Vertebrates Complete metamorphosis features a

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