biol_119__lecture_4__9-09-09

biol_119__lecture_4__9-09-09 - Interested in Physical...

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Interested in Physical Therapy? Come to ISC 136 Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2009 2:00 - 3:00 pm Wendy Meyer-Wilson from SUNY Upstate Medical School will be here to tell you about Programs offered at SUNY Upstate. Hope to see you there!
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Tutors are available in the ISC, Rm 139, Biology Learning Center Lecture 4, September 9, 2009 Biol 119 Sun. Mon. Tues. Wed. Thurs. Katie 6-8 Katie 6-8 Alex 6-8 Alex 4-6 Katie 7-8 Alex 6-7
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Clams are classified as mollusks because of their trochophore larvae, True or False? False. The reasons that clams belong to molluscs are 1. muscular foot 2. visceral mass 3. mantle
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E. Annelids are segmented worms Annelids have bodies composed of a series of fused rings There are about 15,000 species ranging in length from less than 1 mm to 3 m for the giant Australian earthworm. Annelids live in the sea, most freshwater habitats, and damp soil. Examples include earthworms, marine worms and leeches.
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Fig. 33-22 Epidermis Circular muscle Longitudinal muscle Dorsal vessel Chaetae Intestine Nephrostome Fused nerve cords Ventral vessel Metanephridium Septum (partition between segments) Coelom Cuticle Anus Metanephridium Crop Intestine Gizzard Ventral nerve cord with segmental ganglia Blood vessels Subpharyngeal ganglion Mouth Cerebral ganglia Pharynx Esophagus Clitellum Giant Australian earthworm
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Characteristics: The digestive system consists of a pharynx, esophagus, crop, gizzard, and intestine. Earthworms eat their way through the soil, extracting nutrients as the soil moves through the alimentary canal. This helps till the earth, making earthworms valuable to farmers The closed circulatory system carries oxygen-containing blood through dorsal and ventral vessels. The dorsal vessel and five pairs of esophageal vessels act as muscular pumps to distribute blood. In each segment is a pair of excretory tubes, metanephridia , that remove wastes from the blood and coelomic fluid. The wastes are discharged through exterior pores.
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Characteristics continued: A brain-like pair of cerebral ganglia lie above and in front of the pharynx. Earthworms are cross-fertilizing hermaphrodites . Two earthworms exchange sperm and then separate. The received sperm are stored while a special organ, the clitellum, secretes a mucous cocoon. As the cocoon slides along the body, it picks up eggs and stored sperm and slides off the body into the soil. Some earthworms can also reproduce asexually by fragmentation followed by regeneration.
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Each segment of a marine worm (polychaete“many setae”) has a pair of paddle-like or ridgelike parapodia (“almost feet”) that function in locomotion.
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This note was uploaded on 05/04/2011 for the course BIO 119 taught by Professor O'donnellandspear during the Spring '07 term at SUNY Geneseo.

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biol_119__lecture_4__9-09-09 - Interested in Physical...

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