wgu_hum_mod8_summary

Wgu_hum_mod8_summary - Connections Across Disciplines Key Concepts Movements in the Humanities I Those who study culture and history often seek to

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Connections Across Disciplines Key Concepts Movements in the Humanities I Those who study culture and history often seek to identify the broad thematic social and artistic concerns of a give time period, which they then call a "movement." The following table highlights some examples . Movement: CLASSICAL Style of the arts of Western classical antiquity; Order, simplicity, harmony, proportion, restraint Architecture Monumental buildings Mathematical precision Law of the Golden Section (The law expresses the most aesthetically satisfying relationship between the two sides of a plane [for example, a rectangle]: the shorter is to the longer as the longer is to the sum of both. The ratio is 1 to 1.68.) Use of bright colors (which have faded over the millennia) EXAMPLE : The Parthenon Sculpture Perfection of humanness (deities depicted as human beings) Evolves from idealization (prior to 4th century B.C.E.) to greater realism (beginning in 4th century B.C.E.) Sameness of expression: smile of inner satisfaction EXAMPLE: Venus de Milo (2nd century, B.C.E.) Movement: RENAISSANCE Revival of classical art, literature, philosophy, architecture, and learning.
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Painting Great expansion of subjects (for example, portraits, studies of human form, landscapes, historical events, scenes of daily life) Technical advances/developments included linear perspective, trompe l'oeil technique, and improvements in representation of light and shadow Artists applied scientific principles to solve problems of perspective and devised new techniques for representing light and shade. EXAMPLE: Mona Lisa by Leonardo da Vinci Sculpture Inspired by the rediscovery of classical forms and principles Sculptors achieved increasing mastery of materials and techniques, along with greater expressiveness Reached its peak in the early 16th century with the works of Michelangelo EXAMPLE: David (1504) by Michelangelo Movement: NEOCLASSICISM Revival of a classical style (usually that of ancient Greece or Rome) in art, architecture, literature, theater, or music. Characterized by a perception of grandeur in antiquity with classical details and use of classical principles of order and balance. Theater Subjects based on classical myths Adherence to classical unities of time, place, and action Intricate and elaborate costumes and scenery Highly stylized stage poetry (elevated from natural speech) EXAMPLE: Tartuffe (1664) by Moliere Sculpture Perception of grandeur in antiquity with classical details Classical principles of order and balance EXAMPLE: Psyche Revived by Cupid's Kiss (1787-1793) by Antonio Canova Movement: BAROQUE Elaborate and extensive ornamentation; Embellishments and gilding Music Exceptionally intricate and highly complex Strong use of counterpoint (two melodic lines played against each other) 2
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Reliance on improvisation (spontaneous variation or set of variations on a given musical theme) EXAMPLE: Toccata and Fugue in D by Johann Sebastian Bach Architecture Opulent use of ornaments
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This note was uploaded on 05/04/2011 for the course CLC 101 taught by Professor Smith during the Spring '11 term at Western Governors.

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Wgu_hum_mod8_summary - Connections Across Disciplines Key Concepts Movements in the Humanities I Those who study culture and history often seek to

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