Chapter 10 Solutions (5th ed.)

Chapter 10 Solutions (5th ed.) - 10.1, 2, 8, 10, 11, 17,...

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10.1, 2, 8, 10, 11, 17, 18, 21, 22, 79, 84, 85 10.1 Summarize the most important mechanical and physical properties of plastics in engineering applications. The most important mechanical and physical properties of plastics are described in Sections 10.3 through 10.8. Students may create summaries of mechanical properties, make comparisons with other material classes, or investigate novel graphical methods of summarizing the properties. 10.2 What are the major differences between the properties of plastics and of metals? There are several major differences that can be enumerated, as described throughout the chapter. Some examples are: (a) Plastics are much less stiff than metals. (b) They have lower strength than metals and are lighter. (c) The thermal and electrical conductivities of metals are much higher than those for plastics. (d) There are much wider color choices for plastics than for metals. 10.8 Why would we want to synthesize a polymer with a high degree of crystallinity? This is an open-ended question that can be answered in several ways. Students may rely upon particular applications or changes in material properties. One can refer to Section 10.2.1 and Fig. 10.4, and note that a high degree of crystallinity leads to increased stiffness, especially at higher temperatures. 10.10 Discuss the significance of the glass-transition temperature, T g , in engineering applications. The glass-transition temperature is the temperature where a thermoplastic behaves in a manner that is hard, brittle and glassy below this temperature, and rubbery or leathery above it (see Section 10.2.1). Since thermoplastics begin to lose their load- carrying capacity above this temperature, there is an upper useful temperature
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This note was uploaded on 05/05/2011 for the course MEM 431 taught by Professor Zhou during the Spring '08 term at Drexel.

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Chapter 10 Solutions (5th ed.) - 10.1, 2, 8, 10, 11, 17,...

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