ACTPracTest1 - ANSWER SHEET FOR PRACTICE TEST 1 Name: Date:...

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Unformatted text preview: ANSWER SHEET FOR PRACTICE TEST 1 Name: Date: School: Class: / / Start with number 1 for each new section. If a section has fewer questions than answer spaces, leave the extra answer spaces blank. 123456789012345678 1 2345678901234567 Completely darken ovals with 8 1 2345678901234567 a No. 2 pencil. If you make a 8 1 2345678901234567 8 mistake, be sure to erase mark 8 1 2345678901234567 1 2345678901234567 completely. Erase all stray 8 112345678901234567 8 marks. 2345678901234567 8 123456789012345678 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ PART 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ PART 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ BE SURE TO ERASE ANY ERRORS OR STRAY MARKS COMPLETELY. DO NOT MARK IN THIS AREA 1 ⊂⊃ ⊂⊃ ⊂⊃ ⊂⊃ ⊂⊃ ⊂⊃ ⊂⊃ ⊂⊃ ⊂⊃ ⊂⊃ ⊂⊃ ⊂⊃ ⊂⊃ ⊂⊃ ⊂⊃ ⊂⊃ ⊂⊃ ⊂⊃ Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. Start with number 1 for each new section. If a section has fewer questions than answer spaces, leave the extra answer spaces blank. 123456789012345678901234567890121234 123456789012345678901234567890121234 123456789012345678901234567890121234 Use a No. 2 pencil only. Be sure each mark is dark and completely fills 123456789012345678901234567890121234 the intended oval. Completely erase any errors or stray marks. 123456789012345678901234567890121234 123456789012345678901234567890121234 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ PART 3 PART 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ 4 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ ⊂A⊃ ⊂B⊃ ⊂C⊃ ⊂D⊃ ⊂E⊃ ⊂F⊃ ⊂G⊃ ⊂H⊃ ⊂ J ⊃ ⊂K⊃ BE SURE TO ERASE ANY ERRORS OR STRAY MARKS COMPLETELY. 2 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. Practice Test 1 English 75 Questions j Time—45 Minutes 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Directions: This test consists of five passages in which particular words or phrases are under1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 lined and numbered. Alongside the passage, you will see alternative words and phrases that could 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 be substituted for the underlined part. Select the alternative that expresses the idea most clearly 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 and correctly or that best fits the style and tone of the entire passage. If the original version is 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 best, select “No Change.” 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 The test also includes questions about entire paragraphs and the passage as a whole. These 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 questions are identified by a number in a box. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 After you select the correct answer for each question, on your answer sheet, mark the oval 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 corresponding to the correct answer. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 To this day, the Boys Choir of Harlem has 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Essay I 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 always shadowed the Girls Choir. It had been The Girls Choir of Harlem 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 4 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 It is rare to hear of choirs composed of just girls. around longer since 1968 and has received the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 In fact, for every girls’ choir in the United States, 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 attention needed to gain funding and perfor1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 there are ten choirs that are boys’ or mixed. But, mance opportunities. The boys have appeared 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 in 1977, the Girls Choir of Harlem was founded in some of the world’s most prestigious musical 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 to complement the already existing and justly settings. Performing a sunrise concert for the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 3 6 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 renowned Boys Choir. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 Pope on the Great Lawn in New York’s Central 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Park, and they have traveled to Washington, 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 3 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 lawyers, doctors, and politicians—jobs D.C. where in front of the reflecting pool 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 appearing out of reach to them. they sung in front of the Washington monu1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 13 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 ment. Since the Girls Choir of Harlem has 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 8 During the 1980s, when funds dried up, received some of the recognition that the boys 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 have long enjoyed, perhaps corporations and the Girls Choir temporarily disbanded. How1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 wealthy individuals will be motivated to give ever, in 1989, the choir reassembled, and in 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 generously to bring the choir back and ensure it 7 November of 1997, they made their debut at 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 will never again be canceled for lack of money. Alice Tully Hall at Lincoln Center, performing 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 14 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 music by Schumann and Pergolesi toward the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 9 1. A. NO CHANGE 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 audience of dignitaries, including the mayor’s 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. only just girls. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. girls alone. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 wife and thousands of music lovers. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. girls and no boys. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 10 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Giving kids from broken families and 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2. F. NO CHANGE 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 11 1 G. ten are either boys’ or mixed choirs. 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 poverty-stricken homes new confidence and H. each of ten choirs are either boys’ or 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 mixed. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 hope for their future, the Boys Choir of Harlem 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. there are ten that are either boys’ or 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 mixed choirs. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 acts as a haven for inner-city children. The boys 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 3. A. NO CHANGE 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 in the choir still attend the Choir Academy. The 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. what already existed 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. the existing 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 500-student public school strongly emphasizes 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. already existing 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 singing. 12 It’s a fine learning environment 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 4. F. NO CHANGE 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. was 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 that has given the girls ambitions most of them 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. has been 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. being 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 never before considered. The choir members 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 5. A. NO CHANGE 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 speak confidently of someday becoming 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. longer, since 1968 and 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. longer since 1968, and 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. longer (since 1968) and 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 4 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 12. Which of the following sentences, if 6. F. NO CHANGE 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 inserted at this point in the essay, would G. They have performed 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 be most logical and appropriate? H. A performance of 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. The choir performs F. Nevertheless, it provides a well1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 rounded education that helps prepare 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 7. A. NO CHANGE 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 students for a variety of careers. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. they sung in front of the reflecting 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. Classes in vocal technique, sight 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 pool 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 reading, and even music theory are 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. before the reflecting pool they sung 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 all part of the regular curriculum. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. they sung at the reflecting pool 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 H. The student body is carefully selected 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 from a much larger pool of appli1 8. Which of the following sentences provides 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 cants. the most effective transition from the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. Students are admitted based on previous paragraph to this one? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 financial need as well as their musical 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 F. Such glorious moments eluded their 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 abilities, especially their singing 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 female counterparts, at least at first. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 ability. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. The Boys Choir and Girls Choir both 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 have performed mainly in the 13. A. NO CHANGE 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Northeastern part of the U.S. B. appeared 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. The Girls Choir, though not so C. that once appeared 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 experienced as the Boys Choir, is D. that would have appeared 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 considered equally talented. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 14. F. NO CHANGE J. The Boys Choir was able to attract 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. close its doors more funding than the Girls Choir. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 H. stop what they do 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 9. A. NO CHANGE J. go silent 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. before an 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. in front of the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. at an 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 10. F. NO CHANGE 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 G. wife, and 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. wife as well as 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. wife with 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 11. A. NO CHANGE 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. They give 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. By giving 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. As they give 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 5 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Item 15 poses a question about the essay as a required for success. Regardless of the reason 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 whole. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 for inaction, the leader is operating with limited 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 15. Suppose the writer had been assigned to 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 write an essay describing the musical vision, and the company suffers as a result. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 achievements of the Girls Choir of 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Harlem. Would this essay successfully 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 [2] 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 fulfill the assignment? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 By the early 1980s, Wang Corporation had 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 A. Yes, because the essay makes it clear 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 that the girls in the choir are talented developed the preeminent office automation 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 performers. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. Yes, because the concert at Alice capability in the world. In many offices, the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 Tully Hall is explained in some detail. 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 19 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 name “Wang” had become synonymous with C. No, because the music performed by 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the choir is scarcely discussed in the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 “office automation.” Having had gained a essay. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 20 D. No, because the essay discusses the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 reputation for quality and with proprietary Boys Choir as extensively as the Girls 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Choir. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 hardware and software that guaranteed the 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Essay II uniqueness of its product, Wang had built a 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 [The following paragraphs may or may not be 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 arranged in the best possible order. The last item market position that seemingly was unassail1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 will ask you to choose the most effective order 21 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 able. Yet, in less than a decade, Wang faded for the paragraphs as numbered.] 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 22 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Tunnel Vision: The Bane of Business 1 to near obscurity. 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 22 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 [1] 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 [3] Sometimes a business leader stumbles into a 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 In place of Wang’s specialized computer 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 kind of trap by waiting and seeing what new 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 systems, versatile personal computers linked 16 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 technologies develop instead of anticipating 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 together in networks had become the dominant 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 them: trading time for the prospect of more 23 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 office tools. The new personal computers first 17 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 information and a decrease in uncertainty. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 transformed the market for office automation 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Sometimes the leader is simply so afraid to lose 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 networks then wiping out the old market. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 that he or she is incapable of the bold action 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Wang shrank dramatically, surviving only 18 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 6 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 16. F. NO CHANGE by transforming itself—exploiting its software 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. for 24 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 and engineering strengths in completely 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. on 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. to see 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 different ways. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 17. A. NO CHANGE 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. it, 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 [4] 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. them— 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Wang had seen itself as a special kind of 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. them and 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 computer company, one that used large 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 18. F. NO CHANGE 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 25 1 G. that they are 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 machines to serve entire companies. Its excelH. so as to be 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 25 J. that the leaders are 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 lence and leadership in innovation was highly 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 19. A. NO CHANGE 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 respected, and it was important to Wang 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. In fact, in many offices, 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. In many offices, however, 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 not to slip up. That view led Wang to continue 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. Also, in many offices, 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 26 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 with its familiar business until it was too late. It 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 20. F. NO CHANGE 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. Gaining 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 failed to see the opportunity that the personal 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. In order to gain 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. With 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 computer presented. Eventually, Wang did 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 21. A. NO CHANGE 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 attempt to move into personal computers, but 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. that seemed 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. that was seeming 1 by the time that happened. Wang’s opportunity 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. seemingly 1 27 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 to move forward was gone. 28 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 22. Which of the following courses of action 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 involving the underlined sentence would 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 [5] organize the information in Paragraphs 2 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 and 3 in the most logical manner? Businesses don’t always get into trouble because 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 F. NO CHANGE 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 they are badly run or inefficient. Sometimes, a 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. Start a new paragraph with the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 29 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 sentence, and omit the paragraph 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 well-managed company fails because its leaders 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 break after the sentence. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 29 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. Move the sentence to the end of simply don’t understand how the world is chang1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 Paragraph 3. 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. Omit the sentence. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 ing around them. What happened to Wang, the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 office automation company, is a classic example. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 7 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 29. A. NO CHANGE 23. A. NO CHANGE 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. A well-managed company might fail B. will become 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 C. When a well-managed company fails, 7 C. were to become 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 it’s D. soon became 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 D. A company that is well-managed fails 7 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 24. F. NO CHANGE 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. by its transformation 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Item 30 poses a question about the essay as a 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. by means of transforming 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 whole. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. to transform itself 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 30. Which of the following proposals for the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 25. A. NO CHANGE order of the essay’s paragraphs, if 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 B. a company that used large machines 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 implemented, would provide the most 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 to serve entire companies 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 logical and effective beginning and ending 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. whose machines served entire 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 for the essay? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 companies because of their large size 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 F. NO CHANGE (Don’t make any D. using large machines allowing it to 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 changes in the sequence of paraserve entire companies 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 graphs.) 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. Move Paragraph 5 to the beginning 26. F. NO CHANGE 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 of the essay. G. to not lose it 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. Move Paragraph 1 to the end of the H. to maintain that position 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 essay. J. to avoid slip ups 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 J. Move Paragraph 5 to the beginning 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 27. A. NO CHANGE of the essay, and move Paragraph 1 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. it was too late; to the end of the essay. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. by that time 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. when time ran out 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Essay III 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 28. Which of the following sentences, if 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 An Oboist’s Quest 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 inserted at this point in the essay, would 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 [1] 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 be most relevant and effective? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 I started playing the oboe because I heard it F. Wang had been badly outmaneuvered 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 and was left essentially with no market. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 was a challenging instrument. That was four 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. The company failed to foresee the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 day that personal computers would 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 years ago, and I’ve enjoyed learning to play the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 appear on millions of desktops. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. Ultimate responsibility for this lack 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 oboe like I expected. However, it was not until 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 of foresight rested on the shoulders of 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 31 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the company’s leaders. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 recently that I realized what an oboist’s real 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. Apparently, Wang was not the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 excellent computer company everychallenge is: finding good oboe reeds. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 one in the computer industry had 32 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 always assumed it was. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 8 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 without warning. Thus, I need to have several [2] 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Though the reed is a small part of the instru1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 back-up reeds available at all times. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 ment, mainly it is what the quality of the oboe’s 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 33 [4] 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 sound is determined by. Professional oboists I first tried buying reeds from a reed maker in 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 33 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 make their own reeds. Students like me must 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Massachusetts. They were pretty good at first, 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 34 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 buy reeds from either their teachers or from 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 but they became progressively lower and lower 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 35 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 40 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 mail-order companies. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 in quality the longer I bought them from him. It 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 [3] got to the point where none of the reeds he 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 My troubles began when my teacher stopped 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 supplied worked, so I had to move on. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 making reeds, sending all of her students on a 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 [5] 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 wild goose chase for the perfect reed. The 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 My next source was a company in California. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 problem is there’s no such thing as a perfect 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 However, they’re reeds sounded like ducks 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 36 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 41 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 reed, though oboists like to daydream about it. quacking, so I dropped that source from my 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 There is also no such thing as a perfect reed 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 list. Desperate, the next person I called was an 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 42 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 supplier. Reed makers are much in demand, and 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 oboist friend of my parents. She helped me fix a 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 42 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the reeds are often very expensive. 37 What’s 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 few salvageable reeds I owned, and soon I had 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 more, the reed makers tend to take their time in several that played in tune and that created a 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 sending reeds to you. For example, I usually 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 good tone. It seemed my reed troubles were 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 38 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 have to wait three to six weeks after they’ve 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 over. However, within two weeks, those 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 received my check in the mail. This wouldn’t be 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 precious reeds were all played out, and I 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 a problem if I always ordered my reeds well needed more. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 before the time I need it, but oboe reeds are 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 39 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 temperamental and often crack or break 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 9 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 34. F. NO CHANGE [6] 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. reeds, but Recently, however, a friend recommended a 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. reeds, so 43 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. reeds. And, students reed maker from New York City who made 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 35. A. NO CHANGE 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 reeds that, according to him, were rather good. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. from their teachers or 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 44 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. either from their teachers or I called him immediately, and he asked me 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. either from their teachers or from 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 questions about my playing so that he could 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 36. F. NO CHANGE 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 G. is that there’s 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 cater to my oboe needs. He promised to send 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. was there’s 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. is, there’s 1 out a supply of reeds within a week. Imagine 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 37. At this point, the writer wants to provide my disappointment when the reeds he sent 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 an additional remark about the expense of 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 oboe reeds. Which of the following turned out to be poorly made, with unstable 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 sentences would be most relevant and 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 most consistent with the information in tones and a thin, unpleasant sound. 45 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the paragraph as a whole? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 A. In addition, if you purchase a reed by 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 31. A. NO CHANGE mail order, you’re charged a shipping 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. as fee, making the total expense even 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. as much as I greater. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. to the degree in which I B. In my opinion, reed makers often 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 charge twice what I consider a fair 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 32. F. NO CHANGE 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 price for an oboe reed. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. is—it’s finding 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. Students, most of whom are on a 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H is which is finding 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 limited budget, find it difficult to 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. is finding 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 afford expensive reeds. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. However, since professional reed 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 33. A. NO CHANGE 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 makers produce the best possible 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. it is mainly what determines the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 reeds, the high price is well worth it. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 quality of the oboe’s sound 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. it is the main component of the oboe 38. F. NO CHANGE 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 that determines the quality of its G. Typically, 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 sound H. In fact, 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 D. mainly the quality of the oboe’s 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. OMIT the underlined portion. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 sound is determined by the reed 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 10 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Item 45 poses a question about the essay as a 39. A. NO CHANGE 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 whole. B. need them, 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. plan to use it, 45. Which of the following sentences, if 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. need, inserted at this point, would provide an 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 ending for the essay that best ties together 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 40. F. NO CHANGE 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the entire essay? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. less and less 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 A. My search for the perfect reed contin- 7 H. poor 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 ues and may never come to an end un- 7 J. lower 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 til I learn to make reeds myself. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 41. A. NO CHANGE B. With all the oboists in the New York 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 B. it’s 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 City area, you’d think that this reed 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. their 1 maker’s product would be far better 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. its than it was. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. Obviously, I’ll never buy another reed 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 42. F. NO CHANGE from the reed maker that my friend rec- 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 G. I next called an oboist friend of my ommended—or from any of the reed 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 parents makers with whom I’ve already dealt. 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 H. an oboist friend of my parents was D. When I first began playing the oboe, I 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the next person I called never imagined that finding reeds 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 J. I called a person next who was an would be more challenging than actu- 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 oboist friend of my parents ally learning to play the instrument. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 43. Among the following alternatives involv1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Essay IV ing the underlined portion, which provides 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the most logical and effective transition 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 The First Thanksgiving: Turkey Day and a 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 from Paragraph 5 to Paragraph 6? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Whole Lot More 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 A. NO CHANGE 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 [1] B. However, 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. Recently, Every autumn, when Thanksgiving occurs, 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. Also, 46 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 anxiety and stress levels in millions of American 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 44. F. NO CHANGE 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. he claimed 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 families rise. It’s not an easy job to host friends 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. my friend told me 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 47 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. according to my friend and relatives from all over the country then 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 48 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 preparing one of the largest meals of the year. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 But when the typical Thanksgiving dinner of 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 today is compared with the celebration of the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 11 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 brandy. 53 (3) Just in case this weren’t first Thanksgiving, it doesn’t seem like such 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 54 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 a feat. enough, the Pilgrims could fill in the corners 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 with “flint corn,” a rock-hard corn ground into 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 [2] 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 First, consider the menu. At a typical modern1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 a mush. (4) And once the dinner was served, 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 day Thanksgiving dinner, there is a roast 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the meal lasted not a few hours but rather 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 49 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 55 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 turkey, baked yams, stuffing, cranberry sauce, a few days—and with no football on television 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 55 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 gravy, and some sort of dessert—perhaps ice to distract the Pilgrims and their friends from 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 cream and either pie or cake. Of course, you 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the serious business of eating. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 can fix everything yourself from scratch, if you 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 [4] 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 like; but if you prefer, all the food can be 56 Nowadays, in many households, the whole 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 50 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 family comes for Thanksgiving. Statistics show purchased at a local supermarket. In just one 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 50 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 trip, you have all you need for your dinner. that the average Thanksgiving dinner today 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 boasts twenty-three guests total— no tiny 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 [3] 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 57 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 (1) Today’s menu seems stingy by comparison 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 gathering. Both family and friends are included 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 51 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 58 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 to the Pilgrims’ meal enjoyed on the first 1 in this number. At the first Thanksgiving, when 7 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 52 1 58 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Thanksgiving in 1621. (2) According to Squanto, the Indian-in-residence, decided to 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 contemporary records, the list of foods included 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 invite Massasoit, the leader of the Wampanoag 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 five deer; wild turkeys, geese, and duck; eels, 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 tribe, the Pilgrims weren’t expecting him to 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 59 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 lobsters, clams, and mussels fished from the bring along another ninety Wampanoags 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 59 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 ocean; pumpkin; an assortment of biscuits; hoe to a little pot-luck supper. With the Pilgrims, 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 59 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 and ash cakes; popcorn balls; pudding; berries 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 that made a 140-person guest list. 60 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 of several kinds; plums, cherries, and bogbeans; 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 beer made from barley; and wine spiked with 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 12 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 53. Is the repeated use of a semicolon in 46. F. NO CHANGE 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 sentence 2 correct and appropriate? G. when it’s Thanksgiving 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. during Thanksgiving A. Yes, because the sentence lists more 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. whenever Thanksgiving rolls around than three distinct items of food. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. Yes, because the sentence lists 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 47. A. NO CHANGE 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 different categories as well as specific 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. hosting 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 category items. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. as a host to 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 C. No, because the resulting sentence is so 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. of hosting 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 long that it is not easily understood. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. No, because a semicolon should be 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 48. F. NO CHANGE 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 used only to separate clauses that can 7 1 G. country. Then 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 stand alone as complete sentences. H. country; then 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. country, and then 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 54. F. NO CHANGE 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. If 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 49. A. NO CHANGE 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. As if 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. it’s common to eat 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. In the case that 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. you’ll dine on 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. the menu consists of 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 55. A. NO CHANGE 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 B. so many hours that it lasted for a few 7 50. F. NO CHANGE 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 days G. you can purchase all the food 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 C. not just a few hours but rather a few 7 H. all the food is purchasable 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 days J. the food you need you can purchase 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. a few days and not a few hours 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 51. A. NO CHANGE 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 56. Which of the following sentences, if inserted 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. when it is being compared 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 at the beginning of Paragraph 4, would pro- 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. comparing it 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 vide the best transition from Paragraph 3? 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. OMIT the underlined portion. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 F. With none of our modern conve1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 52. F. NO CHANGE 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 niences, such as gas and electric 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. Pilgrim’s meal 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 stoves, the Pilgrims needed far more 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. meal the Pilgrims 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 time to prepare Thanksgiving dinner. 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. Pilgrims’ meal that they 1 G. With so much food and such an 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 extensive menu, it made sense for a 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Pilgrim host to invite as many guests 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 as possible for Thanksgiving dinner. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. At a Pilgrim’s typical Thanksgiving 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 dinner, the number of guests was 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 often very large. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. The other major difference between 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 our Thanksgiving and the Pilgrims’ 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Thanksgiving involves the guest list. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 13 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Item 60 poses a question about the essay as a 57. A. NO CHANGE 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 whole. B. guests in total 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. guests 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 60. The writer wants to add a sentence that 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. guests altogether 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 links the essay’s opening and ending. If 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 inserted at the end of the essay, which of 58. Which of the following proposals for the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the following sentences best achieves this underlined sentence would be most 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 objective? appropriate in the context of Paragraph 4 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 as a whole? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 F. So, instead of complaining about 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 your duties as a Thanksgiving host, F. Revise the sentence as follows: This 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 be thankful you aren’t hosting the number includes friends as well as 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 first Thanksgiving. family. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 G. As it turns out, then, the dinner menu 7 G. Replace the sentence with the 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 for the first Thanksgiving was not following: As it turns out, this 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 too extensive after all. number is actually comparatively 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. Compared to today’s Thanksgiving low. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 hosts, the Pilgrims certainly had their 7 H. Move the sentence to the end of 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 hands full with the large number of Paragraph 4. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 guests for their first Thanksgiving. J. Delete the sentence. (Do not replace 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. The unexpected turnout for the first it with any other sentence.) 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Thanksgiving makes today’s typical 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 59. A. NO CHANGE Thanksgiving dinner look like an 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. the Pilgrims weren’t expecting him to intimate gathering. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 bring along to a little pot-luck supper 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 another ninety Wampanoags 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 Essay V 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. to a little pot-luck supper, the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Pilgrims weren’t expecting him to 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 A People’s Art, for Good and Ill 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 bring along another ninety 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 [1] Wampanoags 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 During movies early years, from about 1910 to 7 D. he wasn’t expected by the Pilgrims to 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 bring another ninety Wampanoags to 61 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1940, the greatness of film as an art form is in a little pot-luck supper 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 62 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 its own ingenuity and invention. And this 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 greatness was not lost on the general public, as 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 the numbers of avid moviegoers grew and grew 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 during this time period. Between 1920 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 63 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 and 1930, a generation of filmmakers emerged 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 63 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 14 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 who were not failed novelists or unsuccessful paid for this democratic appeal to the common 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 playwrights but rather moviemakers—through person. (4) The freshness of the early movie 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 and through. Their essential vision belonged to makers has been lost. 70 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 no other medium with the exception of 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 [4] 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 64 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 The artist who serves an elite audience has a 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the cinema, and this is what made the early 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 71 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 64 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 known patron, or group of patrons, to satisfy. days of filmmaking so vital and exciting. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 If he is strong enough, he can, like the painters 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 [2] 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 of the Renaissance, mold their taste in the 65 Their public was a universal audience of 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 ordinary people, spread across the world. Like image of his own. This is true of the greater and 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 72 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 more resolute artists of the cinema, from the first dramas of Shakespeare, their art was 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 Chaplin in the 1920s to Bergman and Antonot a product for the palace or the mansion, 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 nioni in the 1960s. 73 The larger an audience 7 but rather for the common playhouse where 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 74 66 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 working people sat shoulder to shoulder with and the more costly the movies are to produce, 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the middle class and the well-to-do. This is the greater become the pressures brought to 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 what gave the early movie makers the strength bear on the less conventional creator to make 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 and freshness still perceived by us in their art. his work conform to the pattern of the more 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 67 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 conventional creator. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 [3] 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 (1) Today, movies are more popular than 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 61. A. NO CHANGE 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 ever, and box-office receipts for the great 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. During movies’ early years, 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 68 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. During movie’s early years, 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 international hit films running into hundreds of 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. During the early years of movies, 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 millions of dollars. (2) Movies are becoming 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 62. F. NO CHANGE 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. was more and more conventional, unimaginative, 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 H. lay in 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. is 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 and staler.(3) However, there is a price to be 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 69 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 15 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 70. Which of the following is the best order 63. A. NO CHANGE 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 for the sentences in Paragraph 3? B. Between 1920 and 1930 emerged a 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 generation of filmmakers F. 2, 1, 4, 3 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. Between 1920 and 1930, the emerG. 1, 2, 3, 4 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 gence of a generation of filmmakers 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. 3, 1, 4, 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. A generation of filmmakers emerged 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. 1, 3, 2, 4 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 between 1920 and 1930 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 71. A. NO CHANGE 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 64. F. NO CHANGE 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. has only 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. other medium but the cinema, 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. has had 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. medium with the exception of the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. only has 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 cinema, 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. medium other than the cinema, 72. F. NO CHANGE 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. This can also be 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 65. Which of the following clauses, if added 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. Such an ability is 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 to the beginning of the first sentence in 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. This image is 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Paragraph 2, would provide the most 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 effective transition from Paragraph 1 to 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 73. An editor has suggested that the writer 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Paragraph 2? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 insert a sentence at this point in order to 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 provide a logical and effective connection 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 A. First of all, 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 between the sentence that would precede 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. However, 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 it and the sentence that would follow it. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. Furthermore, 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Which of the following sentences would 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. Without a doubt, 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 best accomplish this objective? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 66. F. NO CHANGE 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 A. These aren’t the only cinematic artists 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. but of 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 who have been able to accomplish 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. but instead for 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 this; but, they are probably the most 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. it was for 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 notable ones. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. All three of these artists were able to 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 67. A. NO CHANGE 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 satisfy the quirky tastes of their 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. we still perceive in their art 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 patrons while satisfying their own 1 C. still perceived in their art today 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 creative urges as well. D. still perceived in their art by us 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 C. But, these artists were interested mainly 7 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 in achieving artistic excellence, not in 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 68. F. NO CHANGE 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 appealing to a mass audience. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. ever; 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. The films of these artists were 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. ever, but 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 eventually seen by millions of people 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. ever, with 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 worldwide. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 69. A. NO CHANGE 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 74. F. NO CHANGE B. more stale 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. For large audiences C. stale 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. If the audiences are large D. even stale 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. A larger audience 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 16 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Item 75 poses a question about the essay as a 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 whole. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 75. An editor has commented that the writer 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 has not ended the essay effectively. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Considering the essay’s overall structure 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 and flow of information, which of the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 following would be the most effective 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 course of action? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 A. Switch the position of Paragraph 3 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 with the position of Paragraph 4. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. Delete the sentence that is currently 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 the last sentence of the essay. 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. Add the following sentence to the end 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 of the essay: The early years of 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 moviemaking were indeed the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 best—for both the makers of films 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 and their audiences. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. Replace the final sentence with the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 following: Nevertheless, some of 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 today’s filmmakers have managed to 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 produce movies with great mass 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 appeal and that are highly creative. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 STOP 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 17 Math 60 Questions j Time—60 Minutes 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Directions: Solve each problem; then, on your answer sheet, mark the oval corresponding to the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 correct answer. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Be careful not to spend too much time on any one question. Instead, solve as many problems as 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 possible, and then use the remaining time to return to those questions you were unable to answer 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 at first. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 You may use a calculator on any problem in this test. However, some problems can best be solved 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 without use of a calculator. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Note: Unless otherwise stated, you can assume that: 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1. Diagrams that accompany problems are not necessarily drawn to scale. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2. All figures lie in the same plane. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 3. The word “line” refers to a straight line (and lines that appear straight are straight). 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 4. The word “average” refers to arithmetic mean. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2. Lyle’s current age is 23 years, and 1. The number 40.5 is 1,000 times greater 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Melanie’s current age is 15 years. How than which of the following numbers? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 many years ago was Lyle’s age twice 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 A. 0.405 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Melanie’s age? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. 0.0405 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 F. 16 C. 0.0450 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. 9 D. 0.00405 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. 8 E. 0.000405 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 J. 7 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 K. 5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 18 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 3 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 6. One marble is to be drawn randomly from 7 3. If x is a real number, and if x 5 100, then 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 a bag that contains three red marbles, two 7 x lies between which two consecutive 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 blue marbles, and one green marble. What 7 integers? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 is the probability of drawing a blue A. 1 and 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 marble? 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. 2 and 3 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 C. 3 and 4 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 F. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 6 D. 4 and 5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 E. 5 and 6 1 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 4. In the standard (x,y) coordinate plane 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 below, which point has the coordinates H. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 (4,25)? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 3 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 K. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7. Point A bisects line segment BC, and point 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D bisects line segment BA. Which of the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 following congruencies holds? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 A. DC ≅ CB 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. BA ≅ CB 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. DC ≅ DA F. P 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. Q 1 D. AD ≅ DB 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. R 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 E. CA ≅ BC 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. S 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 K. T 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2y y 2 1 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 5 , then y 5 8. If 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 9 3 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 5. A certain zoo charges exactly twice as 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 1 much for an adult admission ticket as for 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 F. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 3 a child’s admission ticket. If the total 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 3 admission price for the family of two 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 G. 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 adults and two children is $12.60, what is 5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the price of a child’s ticket? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 4 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 9 A. $1.60 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. $2.10 9 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. $3.20 4 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. $3.30 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 K. 3 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 E. $4.20 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 19 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 3 2 1 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 12. In the figure below, lines a and b are 9. 4 1 3 2 2 5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 4 5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 parallel, and lines c and d are parallel. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 57 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 What is the measure of ∠x? A. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 10 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 231 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 40 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 117 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. 1 20 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 23 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 4 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 29 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 E. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 F. 75° 10. If a 5 3, b 5 23, and c 5 , then ab2c 5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 3 1 G. 95° 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. 100° 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 F. 227 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. 105° 1 G. 21 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 K. 115° H. 3 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. 9 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 13. A solution of 60 ounces of sugar and K. 27 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 water is 20% sugar. If you add x ounces 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 of water to make a solution that is 5% 11. M is P% of what number? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 sugar, which of the following represents 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 100M 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the amount of sugar in the solution after 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 A. 1 P 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 adding water? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 100P A. 60 2 40x 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 M B. 0.05(60x 2 20) 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 M C. 0.05(60 1 x) 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. 0.20(60 1 x) 100P 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 E. 60(0.05 1 x) 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 P 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 100M 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 MP 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 E. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 100 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 20 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 16. A photographic negative measures 14. In the standard (x,y) coordinate plane, 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 7 1 lines a and b intersect at point (5,22) and 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 inches by 2 inches. If the longer side 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 lines b and c intersect at point (23,3). 8 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 of the printed picture is to be 4 inches, 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 What is the slope of line b? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 what will be the length of the shorter side 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 F. of the printed picture? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 F. 3 inches 1 G. 2 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 8 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. 3 inches 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 3 5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. 2 inches 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 4 5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 J. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 8 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. 2 inches 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 K. It cannot be determined from the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 3 1 information given. 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 K. 2 inches 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 8 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 15. In the figure below, M is the midpoint of 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 17. Which of the following is the equation of 7 RS. What is the area of DMOP? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 a straight line that has y-intercept 3 and is 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 y 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 perpendicular to the line 4x 2 2y 5 6? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 A. 2y 1 3x 5 23 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. y 1 3x 5 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. 2y 2 x 5 6 R (2,4) 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. y 2 2x 5 4 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 M 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 E. 2y 1 x 5 6 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 S (4,2) 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 18. Of 60 pairs of socks in a drawer, 40% are 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 x 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 blue, while the remaining socks are all O P 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 gray. If 4 blue socks are removed from the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 drawer, what is the ratio of gray socks to 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 blue socks? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 A. 4.5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. 4 F. 1:2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. 3.5 G. 5:9 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. 3 H. 3:5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 E. 2=2 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. 9:5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 K. 2:1 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 21 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 y2 y2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 22. 19. On the (x,y) coordinate plane, what is the 2 5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 18 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 distance from the point defined by (5,4) 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 F. 0 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 and the point defined by (1,22)? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 10y A. 2=5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 3 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. 4=3 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 2y 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. 5=2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 3 D. 2=13 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 y=3 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 E. 3=6 J. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 6 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 20. Which of the following is NOT a member y=5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 K. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 of the solution set for the equation 3 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2x(3x 2 1)(2x 2 2)(x 2 3) 5 0? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 23. If x 1 y 5 a, and if x 2 y 5 b, then x 5 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 F. 3 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. 2 A. ~a 1 b! 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. 1 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. a 1 b 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. a 2 b J. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 3 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 K. 0 1 ab 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. 1 2 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 21. Which of the following best describes the 1 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 E. ~a 2 b! 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 graph on the number line below? 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 24. If the equation x 1 8x 1 s 5 0 has only 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 one solution, then s 5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 A. |x| . 1.5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 F. 24 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. |x| , 21.5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. 0 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. 21.5 , |x| , 1.5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. 4 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. |x| . 21.5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. 8 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 E. |x| , 1.5 1 K. 16 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 25. On the xy-coordinate plane, a point 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 defined by the (x,y) pair (m,2) lies on a 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 circle with center (3,21) and radius 5. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Which of the following is a possible value 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 of m? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 A. 8 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 B. 6 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. 21 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. 22 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 E. 27 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Î 22 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 29. The average of five numbers is A. If a 26. If the sides of a triangle are 8, 15, and 17 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 sixth number n is added, which of the units long, what is the measure of the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 following represents the average of all six 7 angle formed by the two shortest sides? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 numbers? F. 30° 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 6A 2 n G. 45° 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 A. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 5 H. 60° 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. 75° B. 6A 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 K. 90° 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 n 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. A 1 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 6 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 27. How many different ways can you add 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 5A 1 n 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 four positive odd integers together for a 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 sum of 10, without considering the 6 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 sequence of the integers? 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 A3n 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 E. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 6 A. Five 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. Four 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 30. If two sides of a triangle are 6.5 and 8.5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. Three 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 inches long, which of the following cannot 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. Two 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 be the length of the third side? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 E. One 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 F. 15 inches 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 28. The figure below shows right triangle G. 12 inches 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. 9.5 inches PQR. What is the length of QR? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. 6.5 inches 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 K. 5.5 inches 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 F. 13=3 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 39=2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. 26 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. 30 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 K. 26=2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 23 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 33. If =4x 5 =y, then in terms of y, x 5 31. Referring to the graph below, what was 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the greatest dollar amount by which the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 A. 2y 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 share price of ABC common stock 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 exceeded the share price of XYZ common =y 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. 1 stock during Year X? 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. =y 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. y 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 y 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 E. 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 4 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 34. The distance a moving object travels can 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 be determined as the product of the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 object’s rate of motion (r), or speed, and 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the amount of time (t) traveling. If a boat 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 travels m miles in 4 hours, then an 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 additional 20 miles in t hours, which of 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 the following represents the boat’s average 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 speed, in miles per hour, over the total 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 distance? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 t14 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 F. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 m 1 20 A. $1.80 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. $2.60 m 1 20 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. $3.00 t14 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. $3.60 tm 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 H. E. It cannot be determined from the 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 20 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 information given. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 t 1 20 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 m14 32. If x and y are negative integers, and if 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 x 2 y 5 1, what is the least possible value 4tm 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 K. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 of xy? 5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 F. 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. 1 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 H. 0 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. 21 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 K. 22 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 24 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 23 5 32 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 37. If A 5 35. In the figure below, if AB i DC and and B 5 , 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 37 21 1 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 AD i BC, what is the measure of ∠ABD? then 2A 2 B 5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 23 12 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 A. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 5 15 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 29 8 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 5 13 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 29 8 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 7 13 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 A. 40° 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 26 3 B. 45° 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 46 C. 50° 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. 55° 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 23 8 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 E. 60° 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 E. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 7 13 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 36. What is the value of m in the following 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 38. In an arithmetic sequence, each successive 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 system of two equations? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 term is either greater than or less than the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 4m 5 12 2 3n 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 preceding term by the same amount. What 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 3 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 is the tenth term of the arithmetic sen532m 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 4 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 quence 30, 27, 24, . . . ? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 F. 26 F. 10 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. 23 G. 3 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. 2 H. 0 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. 8 J. 23 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 K. Any real number K. 230 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 x 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 39. If f(x) 5 6 and g(x) 5 log6x, which of the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 following expressions is equal to f(2g(M))? 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 A. 2M 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. 6M 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 C. M 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. M6 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2M 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 E. 6 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 F F F F F F G G G G G G F G Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 25 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 42. Three carpet pieces—in the shapes of a 40. The figure below shows a rectangular 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 square, a triangle, and a semicircle—are solid with the following unit dimensions: 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 attached to one another, as shown in the QR 5 3, QS 5 4, and ST 5 5. How many 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 figure below, to cover the floor of a room. 7 units long is RT? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 If the area of the square is 144 feet and 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the perimeter of the triangle is 28 feet, 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 what is the perimeter of the room’s floor, 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 in feet? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 F. 32 1 12p 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. 40 1 6p 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. 34 1 12p 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. 52 1 6p 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 K. 52 1 12p F. 4=2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. 6 43. DPQR below has angle measures 90, u, 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. 4=3 and b degrees as shown. Which of the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. 7 following is true for all possible values of 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 u and b? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 K. 5=2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 41. Two competitors battle each other in each 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 match of a tournament with six partici1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 pants. What is the minimum number of 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 matches that must occur for every 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 competitor to battle every other 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 competitor? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 A. 21 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. 18 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. 16 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. 15 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 E. 12 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 A. tanu 5 tanb 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. sinu 1 cosb = 1 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. sinu 3 cosb 5 1 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. tanu 3 tanb 5 1 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 E. sinu tanb 5 cosb 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 26 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 x2 2 4 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 5 47. For all x . 2, 2 44. Two ships leave from the same port at 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 x 2 2x 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 11:30 a.m. If one sails due east at 24 miles 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 4 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 per hour and the other due south at 10 A. x 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 x 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 miles per hour, how many miles apart are 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 1 the ships at 2:30 p.m.? 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2x 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 F. 45 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. 62 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. 1 1 1 x 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. 68 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. 2 2 x J. 78 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 K. 84 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 E. 2x 2 1 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 45. If the circumference of the circle pictured 48. Events A, B, and C occur every 5 days, 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 below is 16p units, what is the unit length 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 3 days, and 8 days, respectively. What is 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 of AC? the number of days after events A, B, and 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C all occur on the same day that they all 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 occur again for the first time on the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 same day? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 F. 45 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. 65 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 H. 80 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. 90 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 K. 120 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 49. If two of the angles of the polygon shown 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 below are congruent, then x 5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 A. 4=2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. 16 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. 16=2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 A. 78 1 D. 32 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. 84 E. 16p 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. 120 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. 150 46. If =3x 5 6i, then x 5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 E. 174 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 F. 12 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. 6 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. 3 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 K. 212 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 27 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 53. The figure below shows a parabola in the 50. If x 1 2 5 24x, what are the possible 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 standard (x,y) coordinate plane. values of x? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 F. 24 6 =2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. 22 6 =2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. 2 6 =2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. 4 6 =2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 K. 4 6 2=2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 51. A certain cube contains 125 cubic inches. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 What is the surface area, in square inches, 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 of each square face of the cube? Which of the following equations does the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 graph best represent? A. 5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. 10 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 A. y 5 x 1 3x 1 9 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. 15 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. y 5 x 2 2x 1 6 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. 20 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. y 5 2x 1 x 2 3 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 E. 25 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. y 5 x 2 6x 1 9 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 E. y 5 x 1 2x 1 3 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 52. A certain clock runs 48 minutes slow 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 every 12 hours. Four hours after the clock 54. The figure below shows a flat picture mat 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 is set correctly, the correct time is 4:00. In around a square painting. The width of 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 how many minutes, to the nearest minute, the mat is 1 inch, and the area of the mat 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 will the clock show 4:00? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 is 60 square inches. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 F. 13 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. 14 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. 15 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. 16 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 K. 17 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 What is the length, in inches, of one side 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 of the painting? 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 F. 30 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. 24 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. 18 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. 14 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 K. 12 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 28 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 55. The altitude of a triangle is the distance 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 from its base to the vertex opposite the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 base. If the length of the base (b) of a 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 triangle and the triangle’s altitude are 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 equal in length, which of the following 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 represents the area of the triangle? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 b 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 A. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 2b 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 3 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. b H. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 D. 4b 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 E. 2b 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 is 56. The graph of the equation x 5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 y22 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 shown below. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 J. 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Which of the following best represents the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 ? equation x 5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 y22 K. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 F. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 | | Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 29 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 59. If m 5 n and p . q, then which of the 57. In DPQR below, if tanx . 1, all of the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 following inequalities holds true in all following must be true EXCEPT: 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 cases? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 A. m 2 p . n 2 q 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. p 2 m , q 2 n 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. m 2 p , n 2 q 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. mp . nq 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 E. m 1 q . n 1 p 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 60. In the standard (x,y) coordinate plane, the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 amplitude of a graph is half the distance 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 between the graph’s minimum and maxiA. x . 45 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 mum y-values. What is the amplitude of the 7 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. y . 45 graph of the equation y 2 1 5 2cos3u? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. PQ Þ QR 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 F. 6 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. x 1 y 5 90 1 G. 3 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 E. x Þ y 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 3 58. An isosceles triangle has two sides of 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 length 3 feet each. The angle formed by 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the two 3-foot sides measures 32°. What is K. 1 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the length of the triangle’s third side? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 F. 3cos32° 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. 3sin32° 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. 3sin16° 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. 6tan16° 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 K. 6sin16° 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 STOP 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 30 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. Reading 40 Questions j Time—35 Minutes 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Directions: This test consists of four passages, each followed by several questions. Read each 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 passage and select the best answer for each question following the passage. Then, on your answer 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 sheet, mark the oval corresponding to the best answer. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 key—she’d forgotten it, as usual—and Passage I—Prose Fiction 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 rattling the letter-box. “It’s not what I 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Line Although Bertha Young was thirty she 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 mean, because—Thank you, Mary”—she 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 still had moments like this when she 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 went into the hall. “Is nurse back?” 1 wanted to run instead of walk, to take 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 “Yes, M’m.” (30) dancing steps on and off the pavement, 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 “I’ll go upstairs.” And she ran to bowl a hoop, to throw something up (5) 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 upstairs to the nursery. in the air and catch it again, or to stand 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 Nurse sat at a low table giving Little 7 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 still and laugh at—nothing—at nothing, 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B her supper after her bath. The baby 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 simply. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 had on a white flannel gown and a blue (35) 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 What can you do if you are thirty 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 woolen jacket, and her dark, fine hair 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 (10) and, turning the corner of your own 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 was brushed up into a funny little peak. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 street, you are overcome, suddenly, by a 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 She looked up when she saw her mother 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 feeling of bliss—absolute bliss!—as 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 and began to jump. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 though you’d suddenly swallowed a 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 “Now, my lovey, eat it up like a good 7 (40) 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 bright piece of that late afternoon sun 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 girl,” said Nurse, setting her lips in a way 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 (15) and it burned in your bosom, sending out 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 that Bertha knew, and that meant she 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 a little shower of sparks into every 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 had come into the nursery at another 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 particle, into every finger and toe. . . ? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 wrong moment. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Oh, is there no way you can express 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 “Has she been good, Nanny?” (45) 1 it without being “drunk and disorderly?” 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 “She’s been a little sweet all the (20) How idiotic civilization is! Why be given 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 afternoon,” whispered Nanny. “We went 7 a body if you have to keep it shut up in a 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 to the park and I sat down on a chair case like a rare, rare fiddle? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 and took her out of the carriage and a 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 “No, that about the fiddle is not 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 big dog came along and put its head on (50) 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 quite what I mean,” she thought, running 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 my knee and she clutched its ear, tugged 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 (25) up the steps and feeling in her bag for the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 it. Oh, you should have seen her.” 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 31 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 And, indeed, she loved Little B so Bertha wanted to ask if it wasn’t (95) 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 much—her neck as she bent forward, her 7 rather dangerous to let her clutch at a 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 exquisite toes as they shone transparent strange dog’s ear. But she did not dare to. (55) 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 in the firelight—that all her feeling of She stood watching them, her hands by 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 bliss came back again, and again she her side, like the poor little girl in front 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 of the rich little girl with the doll. (100) didn’t know how to express it—what to 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 do with it. The baby looked up at her again, 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 “You’re wanted on the telephone,” (60) stared, and then smiled so charmingly 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 said Nanny, coming back in triumph and 7 that Bertha couldn’t help crying: 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 seizing her Little B. “Oh, Nanny, do let me finish giving 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 her supper while you put the bath things 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 away.” 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1. Based on the passage, Bertha can reason1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 (65) “Well, M’m, she oughtn’t to be 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 ably be considered to be all of the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 changed hands while she’s eating,”said 1 following EXCEPT: 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Nanny, still whispering. “It unsettles her; 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 A. imaginative. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 it’s very likely to upset her.” 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. affectionate. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 How absurd it was. Why have a baby 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. timid. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 (70) if it has to be kept—not in a case like a 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. arrogant. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 rare, rare fiddle—but in another wom1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 an’s arms? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2. Nanny’s facial expression upon seeing 1 “Oh, I must!” said she. 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Bertha’s arrival in the nursery suggests: Very offended, Nanny handed her 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 F. relief as she can at last eat her supper. 7 (75) over. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. a vain attempt to suppress her joy at “Now, don’t excite her after her 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 seeing Bertha. supper. You know you do, M’m. And I 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. dislike for Bertha’s ill-timed visits to have such a time with her after!” 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the nursery. Thank heaven! Nanny went out of 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 J. fear of dismissal from her job because 7 (80) the room with the bath towels. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the nursery is untidy. “Now I’ve got you to myself, my 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 little precious,” said Bertha, as the baby 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 3. Bertha uses the metaphor of a “rare, rare 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 leaned against her. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 fiddle” (line 22) to suggest that: 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 She ate delightfully, holding up her 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 (85) lips for the spoon and then waving her A. she considers her baby girl an 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 hands. Sometimes she wouldn’t let the extraordinary child. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 spoon go; and sometimes, just as Bertha B. she is frustrated by not feeling free to 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 had filled it, she waved it away to the express her musical talents. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 four winds. C. people of a certain age are expected 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 (90) When the soup was finished Bertha 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 to follow a certain code of behavior. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 turned round to the fire. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. wealthy mothers are not allowed to 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 “You’re nice—you’re very nice!” said 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 look after their children. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 she, kissing her warm baby. “I’m fond of 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 you. I like you.” 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 32 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7. In comparing Bertha to a “poor little girl” 7 4. Nanny would most likely agree with 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 (line 57), the narrator is suggesting that which of the following characterizations 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Bertha: of Bertha? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 A. lacks emotional and psychological F. She is a thoughtless person and an 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 strength. inexperienced mother. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. is deprived of care-giving time with G. She is a kind employer but a strict 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 her baby. mother. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. suffers from an unrealistic hope of H. She is forgetful and has no sense of 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 having more babies. class distinctions in society. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 D. desires a closer relationship with Nanny. 7 J. She is giddy and is always lost in her 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 overactive imaginings. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 8. It can be reasonably inferred from the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 passage that the central characteristic of 5. Which of the following statements about 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Nanny is: the relationship between Bertha and 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Nanny do the details in the passage best 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 F. kindness. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 support? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. disrespectfulness. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. jealousy. A. Nanny is tired of working for Bertha and 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. possessiveness. would like to find other employment. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. Bertha feels that Nanny is a compe1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 9. Based on the passage, the kind of bliss tent nurse and would do anything to 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 that Bertha experienced, as described in 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 keep her on. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the first three paragraphs, can best be 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. Nanny considers herself the baby’s 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 described as a(n): 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 primary caregiver and Bertha just an 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 occasional visitor in the baby’s life. A. emotion brought forth by a walk in 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 D. Bertha prefers to give over control of 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the park. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the child to Nanny so that she is able 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. pleasant feeling caused by nothing 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 to fulfill her inappropriate youthful 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 specific. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 fantasies. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 C. overwhelming feeling of maternal love. 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 D. tingling feeling in one’s fingers and toes. 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 6. It can most reasonably be inferred that the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 word absurd, as it is used in line 69, refers to: 10. From the use of the word “triumph” in 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the last paragraph, it is reasonable to infer 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 F. Nanny’s overly possessive attitude 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 that Nanny is: 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 towards the baby. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 G. the fact that women over 30 cannot 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 F. happy to have Little B and the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 be impulsive in behavior. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 nursery to herself again. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. Bertha’s not being able to question 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. glad that Little B has been able to 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Nanny’s decision to let Little B play 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 spend some time with her mother. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 with a dog. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 H. feeling justified in her total control of 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. the fact that Bertha is obligated to 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 all matters pertaining to the nursery. 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 have a nanny to take care of her 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. glad because the phone call was 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 child. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 about another baby being put under 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 her charge. 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 33 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Mohawk. Despite this opposition, in Passage II—Social Studies 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1836, construction of the railroad began. 7 Line After the opening of the Erie Canal in 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 The Panic of 1837, which precipi1825, the Legislature of New York 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 tated a major economic depression in the 7 (45) directed a land survey for a state railroad 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 U.S., interfered with the work, but in 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 that was to be constructed, at public 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1838 the state legislature provided a 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 expense, through the southern tier of (5) 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 construction loan of $3 million, and the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 counties from the Hudson River to Lake 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 first section of line, extending from 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Erie. The unfavorable profile that the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 Piermont on the Hudson to Goshen, was 7 (50) 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 survey indicated apparently prompted the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 put in operation in September of 1841. In 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 legislature to abandon the project. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 the following year, however, the company 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 (10) But, the notion of an east-to-west 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 became insolvent and was placed by the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 railroad spanning nearly the entire 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 courts in the hands of government 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 breadth of the state continued to hold 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 receivers. This financial disaster delayed (55) 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 sway over the minds of many New 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 further progress for several years, and it 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Yorkers, and the significant benefits that 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 was not until 1846 that sufficient new 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 (15) the Erie Canal had brought to the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 capital was raised to continue the work. 1 Mohawk Valley and surrounding country 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 The original estimate for building the 7 led the southern counties to demand a 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 entire line of 485 miles had been $3 (60) rail route that would work similar 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 million, but already the road had cost wonders in that region. This growing 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 over $6 million, and only a small portion 7 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 (20) sentiment finally persuaded the legisla1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 had been completed. The final estimate 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 ture to charter, in April 1832, the New 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 now rose to $15 million, and, although 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 York and Erie Railroad Company, and to 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 some money was raised from time to (65) 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 give it authority to construct tracks and 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 time and new sections were built, 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 regulate its own charges for transporta1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 whether the entire road would ever be 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 (25) tion. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 competed was far from certain. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 During the following summer, a 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Ultimately, however, the courts 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 partial survey of the route was made by 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 allowed the company’s assets out of (70) 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Colonel De Witt Clinton Jr., and in 1834 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 receivership, and the company soon 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 a second survey was made of the whole 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 secured new subscriptions of some 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 (30) of the proposed route. When the prob1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 millions of dollars, while raising addi1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 able cost was estimated, opposition to 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 tional money by mortgaging the sections 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the project grew. Many detractors 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 of railroad already finished. Finally, in (75) 1 asserted that the undertaking was 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1851, after eighteen years of effort, the “chimerical, impractical, and useless.” 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 line was opened to Lake Erie. Various (35) The road, they declared, could never be 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 feeders, or branches, were also added, built and, if built, would never be used; 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 providing rail entry into Scranton, 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the southern counties were mountainous, 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Pennsylvania, as well as Geneva and (80) 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 sterile, and worthless, and afforded no 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Buffalo, New York. The railroad’s 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 products requiring a market; and, in any 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 western terminus, at Lake Erie, was at 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 (40) case, these counties should find their 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Dunkirk, while its eastern terminus was 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 natural outlet in the valley of the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 at Piermont, near Nyack on the Hudson, 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 34 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 12. As it is used in the passage, the word (85) about 25 miles by boat from New York 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 subscriptions (line 72) most nearly means: 7 City. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 In the end, even the highest cost F. an agreement to order a specified 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 estimate of $15 million, made during number of issues of a newspaper. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 construction, turned out far too low. The 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. receiving discounted tickets for a 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 (90) company started its operations in 1851 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 series of railway trips. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 with capital obligations of no less than 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. contributions of a specified amount 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 $26 million—an outrageously large sum 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 to a project. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 for those days. When the Erie Railroad 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. a membership fee paid regularly. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 began operations, the heavy burden of 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 (95) these initial obligations soon became 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 13. Which of the following statements best 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 apparent. Freight rates were so high that 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 describes the author’s method and 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 indignant shippers began banning 1 purpose for addressing his subject? 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 together in mutual support, and en masse 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 A. Presenting a comparative history of 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 appealed to the state for legislative relief. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 railroads to justify the success story 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 (100) And, although the company had raised a 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 of the Erie Railroad 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 substantial amount of money for 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. Constructing an argument for the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 improvements after 1849, the condition 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 construction of the Erie Railroad 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 of the railway, and the reputation of the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 based on the sentiment of the people 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 company, steadily declined. The Erie 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 of the state of New York 1 (105) Railroad soon became notorious for its 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 C. Presenting the author’s own personal 7 many accidents, some due to carelessness 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 experience in the field of railway in the running of trains, others due to the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 construction in order to acquaint the 7 breaking of the brittle iron rails. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 reader with the financial hurdles In spite of these problems, the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 faced by the Erie Railroad project 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 (110) business of the Erie grew. In 1852, it 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. Presenting a series of researched facts 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 acquired the Ramapo, Paterson, and 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 in order to provide a detailed 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Hudson River Railroads, thereby 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 chronological history of the Erie 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 securing a more direct connection with 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Railroad 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 New York City. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 14. Based on the passage, it can be reasonably 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 11. It can be inferred from the passage that 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 inferred that the most remote connecting 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the Erie Railroad cost approximately: 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 points of the Erie Railroad were at: 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 A. $36 million. 1 F. Lake Erie and New York City. 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. $26 million. G. Lake Erie and Piermont on the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. $15 million. Hudson. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. $3 million. H. the cities of Geneva and Buffalo. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. Mohawk Valley and Lake Erie. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 35 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 19. It can be reasonably inferred from the 15. Opponents of the Erie Railroad project 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 passage that the Erie Railroad Company provided all of the following reasons in 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 developed an unfavorable reputation arguing against constructing the Erie 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 because of its: Railroad EXCEPT: 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 A. many accidents. A. cost estimates were too high. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. high freight rates. B. the proposed route was through 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. bankruptcy. extremely rough terrain. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. lack of connecting lines. C. there weren’t enough marketable 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 products along the proposed route. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 20. The passage provides clearest support for D. interest in a connection to Lake Erie 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 which of the following statements? was insufficient. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 F. Constructing the Erie Railroad is a 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 16. How long after construction of the Erie 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 remarkable feat of engineering. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Railroad began did it take for the railroad 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 G. The construction of the Erie Railroad 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 to first reach Lake Erie? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 was a disaster of unimaginable 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 proportions. F. 3 years 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. Subsequent surveys changed the G. 10 years 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 planned route during construction. H. 18 years 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. The proposed route for the railroad J. 30 years 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 was successfully completed and 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 17. In the context of the passage, the word 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 expanded upon. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 insolvent (line 53) most nearly means: 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Passage III—Humanities 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 A. incapable of being solved. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Line On July 1, 1882, a brief notice appeared B. unable to pay debts. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 in the Portsmouth (England) Evening C. unable to distribute. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 News. It read simply, “Dr. Doyle begs to D. incapable of showing profit. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 notify that he has removed to 1, Bush 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 18. The fact that construction of the railroad (5) Villas, Elm Grove, next to the Bush 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 continued despite the Panic of 1837 was 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Hotel.” So was announced the newly 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 due primarily to: 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 formed medical practice of a 23-year-old 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 graduate of Edinburgh University— F. the raising of additional money by 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Arthur Conan Doyle. But the town of the Erie Railroad Company. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 (10) Southsea, the Portsmouth suburb in G. a loan from the Legislature of New 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 which Doyle had opened his office, 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 York. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 already had several well-established 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. the acquisition of feeders to the main 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 physicians, and while he waited for 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 line. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 patients the young Dr. Doyle found 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. a court order allowing construction 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 (15) himself with a great deal of time on his 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 to proceed. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 hands. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 To fill it, he began writing—short 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 stories, historical novels, whatever would 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 keep him busy and, hopefully, bring 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 36 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 working as a London hansom cab driver, 7 (20) additional funds into his sparsely filled 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 A Study in Scarlet was rejected by several 7 coffers. By the beginning of 1886, his 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 publishers before being accepted that fall 7 practice had grown to the point of (65) 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 for publication by Ward, Lock & providing him with a respectable if not 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 Company as part of Beeton’s Christmas munificent income, and he had managed 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Annual in 1887. Although the author (25) to have a few pieces published. Although 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 asked to be paid a royalty based on sale literary success still eluded him, he had 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 of the book, his publisher offered instead 7 developed an idea for a new book, a (70) 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 only a flat fee of £25 for the copyright detective story, and in March he began 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 (the equivalent of approximately $50 writing the tale that would give birth to 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 today). Doyle reluctantly accepted. (30) one of literature’s most enduring figures. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 A handful of reviewers commented Although he was familiar with and 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 kindly on the story, but the reading (75) impressed by the fictional detectives 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 public as a whole was unimpressed. created by Edgar Allan Poe, Emile 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 Ward, Lock published A Study in Scarlet 7 Gaboriau, and Wilkie Collins, Doyle 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 in book form the following year, while (35) believed he could create a different kind 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the disappointed author returned to his of detective, one for whom detection was 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 historical novels, with which he had (80) a science rather than an art. As a model, 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 finally achieved some modest success. he used one of his medical school 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Fictional detection, Doyle thought, was professors, Dr. Joseph Bell. As Bell’s 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 behind him. In August, 1889, however, (40) assistant, Doyle had seen how, by 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 he was approached by the editor of the exercising his powers of observation and 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 American Lippincott’s Monthly Maga(85) deduction and asking a few questions, 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 zine, published in Philadelphia and Bell had been able not only to diagnose 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 London, to write another Sherlock his patients’ complaints but also to 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Holmes story. Although he had little (45) accurately determine their professions 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 interest in continuing Holmes’s advenand backgrounds. A detective who 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 tures, Doyle was still in need of money (90) applied similar intellectual powers to the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 and accepted the offer. solving of criminal mysteries could be a 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 Published in Lippincott’s in February, 7 compelling figure, Doyle felt. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1890, and in book form later that year, (50) At first titled A Tangled Skein, the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 The Sign of the Four chronicled Holmes’s 7 story was to be told by his detective’s 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 investigation of the murder of Bartho(95) companion, a Dr. Ormand Sacker, and 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 lomew Sholto and his search for the detective himself was to be named 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Jonathan Small and a treasure stolen by Sherrinford Holmes. But by April, 1886, 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 British soldiers in India. It too, however, 7 (55) when Doyle finished the manuscript, the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 met with little enthusiasm from the title had become A Study in Scarlet, the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 (100) public. In the meantime, however, narrator Dr. John H. Watson, and the 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Doyle’s other small literary successes had 7 detective Mr. Sherlock Holmes. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 enabled him to move to London, where A tale of revenge, in which Holmes is 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 he became a consulting physician. (60) able to determine that two Mormons 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Fortunately, even this new London visiting England from Utah have been 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 (105) practice did not keep him very busy, killed by Jefferson Hope, an American 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 37 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 23. It can be inferred from the passage that leaving him time to concentrate on his 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Dr. Doyle could be appropriately dewriting. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 scribed as any of the following EXCEPT In April, 1891, he submitted a short 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 a(n): Sherlock Holmes story, “A Scandal in 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 (110) Bohemia,” to a new magazine called The 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 A. doctor who was less than fully 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Strand. It was with the publication of this 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 devoted to a career in medical. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 story, and the series of Holmes tales 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. writer passionate about his fictional 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 which followed, that the public finally 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 detective Sherlock Holmes. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 took an interest in Dr. Doyle’s detective, 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. writer who considered his historical 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 (115) enabling him to give up his practice and 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 novels to be of some importance. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 turn to writing full time. Despite his own 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. author who was open-minded to 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 continuing lack of enthusiasm for his 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 publication of his works in America. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 protagonist—he considered the Holmes 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 stories insignificant compared to his 24. What set Dr. Doyle’s detective fiction 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 (120) “serious” historical novels—spurred by apart from previously published detective 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the public clamor for more Sherlock fiction? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Holmes, Doyle eventually wrote 56 short 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 F. His fictional detection was firmly 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 stories and four novels in the series, and 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 based on scientific methodology. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 in the process created what may be the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. He always based his protagonists on 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 (125) best-known character in all of English 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the exploits of Americans living 1 literature. 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 abroad. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. Most of his fictional detection was 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 21. As it is used in the passage, the word 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 based on the solving of real myster1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 munificent (line 24) most nearly means: 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 ies. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 J. His detective stories were based 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 A. noble. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 primarily on medical mysteries. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. sparse. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 C. bountiful. 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 25. Among the following, who was Doyle’s D. extra. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 biggest influence in the creation of his 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 fictional detective Sherlock Holmes? 22. According to the passage, the public 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 finally expressed an interest in Dr. Doyle’s 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 A. Doyle’s publicist 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 detective fiction stories after they were 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. A police detective in Southsea 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 published in: 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. Dr. Joseph Bell 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 D. Edgar Allan Poe 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 F. Beeton’s Christmas Annual. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 G. Portsmouth Evening News. 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. The Strand. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. Lippincott’s Monthly Magazine. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 38 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 29. It can be inferred from the passage that 26. According to the passage, Doyle started 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Doyle abandoned his medical career writing because: 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 primarily because of the: F. he had always been fascinated by 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 A. success of his historical novels. murder mysteries. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. increase in demand for more of G. he hoped to stay occupied and make 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Holmes’s adventures. extra money. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 C. large number of medical practitioners 7 H. he had always aspired to be a famous 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 in London. author. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. lack of interest in medical journals J. there were too many physicians in 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 among publishers. Southsea. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 30. At a minimum, about how long had Doyle 7 27. The author of the passage uses the word 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 been writing fictional stories before the fortunately in line 104 in order to suggest 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 public began to take a strong interest in that: 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 any of his stories? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 A. consulting physicians in London are 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 F. Two years typically too busy to engage in 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. Five years hobbies such as writing. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. Seven years B. it would have been in Doyle’s best 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. Nine years interest at the time to concentrate on 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 his medical practice. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 Passage IV—Natural Science 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. Doyle was convinced at that time 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 [The following passage discusses the difficulties 7 that his literary career was destined 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 involved in identifying common causes for com- 7 for success. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 munity cancer clusters.] D. Doyle’s literary career was more 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 important than his medical career. 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Line Community cancer clusters are localized 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 patterns of excessive cancer occurrence. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 28. Based on the passage, it can be most 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 They are viewed quite differently by 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 reasonably inferred that Doyle moved to 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 citizen activists than by epidemiologists. 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 London because: 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 (5) Environmentalists and concerned local 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 F. he could finally afford to reside there. residents, for instance, might immediately 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. he wanted to practice medicine in a suspect environmental radiation as the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 larger town with more opportunities. culprit when a high incidence of cancer 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. of the many opportunities there to cases occurs near a nuclear facility. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 earn supplemental income. 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 (10) Epidemiologists, in contrast, would be 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. his publisher was based in London. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 more likely to say that the incidences 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 were “inconclusive” or the result of pure 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 chance. And when a breast cancer 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 survivor, Lorraine Pace, mapped twenty 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 (15) breast cancer cases occurring in her West 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Islip, Long Island, community, her 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 rudimentary research efforts were guided 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 more by hope—that a specific environ1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 39 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 been traced to an environmental cause. mental agent could be correlated with the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 Health officials often discount a commu- 7 (20) cancers—than by scientific method. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 nity’s suspicion of a common environWhen epidemiologists study clusters 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 mental cause because citizens tend to of cancer cases and other noncontagious (65) 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 include cases that were diagnosed before conditions such as birth defects or 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the afflicted individuals moved into the miscarriage, they take several variables 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 neighborhood. Add to this the problem (25) into account, such as background rate 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 of cancer’s latency. Unlike an infectious (the number of people affected in the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 disease like cholera, which is caused by a 7 (70) general population), cluster size, and 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 recent exposure to food or water specificity (any notable characteristics of 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 contaminated with the cholera bactethe individual affected in each case). If a 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 rium, cancer may have its roots in an (30) cluster is both large and specific, it is 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 exposure that occurred ten to twenty easier for epidemiologists to assign 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 years earlier. Citizens also conduct what (75) blame. Not only must each variable be 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 one epidemiologist calls “epidemiological 7 considered on its own, but it must also be 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 gerrymandering”: finding cancer cases, combined with others. Lung cancer is 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 drawing a boundary around them, and (35) very common in the general population. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 then mapping this as a cluster. Yet when a huge number of cases turned 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Do all these caveats mean that the (80) up among World War II shipbuilders who 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 hard work of Lorraine Pace and other had all worked with asbestos, the size of 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 community activists is for naught? Not the cluster and the fact that the men had 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 necessarily. Together with many other (40) had similar occupational asbestos 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 reports of breast cancer clusters on Long 7 exposures enabled epidemiologists to 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Island, the West Islip situation high(85) assign blame to the fibrous mineral. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 lighted by Pace has helped epidemioloFurthermore, even if a cluster seems 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 gists lay the groundwork for a welltoo small to be analyzed conclusively, it 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 designed scientific study. (45) may still yield important data if the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 background rate of the condition is low 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 enough. This was the case when a 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 31. It can be inferred from the passage that 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 cervical cancer turned up almost simulta1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 community cancer clusters refer to cancer 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 neously in a half-dozen young women. 1 patterns existing in a: 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 (50) While six would seem to be too small a 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 A. particular religious community. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 cluster for meaningful study, the cancer 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. communal living environment. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 had been reported only once or twice 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. particular geographic location. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 before in the entire medical literature. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. specific part of the human body. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Researchers eventually found that the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 (55) mothers of all the afflicted women had 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 32. As it is used in the passage, the word 1 taken the drug diethylstilbestrol (DES) 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 rudimentary (line 17) most nearly means: while pregnant. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 F. healthy. Although several known carcinogens 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. basic. have been discovered through these kinds 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. scientific. (60) of occupational or medical clusters, only 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. rigorous. one community cancer cluster has ever 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 40 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 36. Which of the following would be most 33. What led the epidemiologists to conclude 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 similar to “epidemiological gerrymander- 7 that asbestos exposure causes lung cancer 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 ing,” which the author describes in the (lines 41–42) was a combination of all of 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 fourth paragraph (lines 76–77)? the following EXCEPT: 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 F. A politician’s changing voting district 7 A. the number of cases of lung cancer 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 boundaries to gain advantage for was large. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 elections B. all the people affected were World 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 G. A census report’s correlating statisti- 7 War II shipbuilders. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 cal data according to gender and race 7 C. spouses of asbestos workers did not 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. A school’s redistributing students typically develop lung cancer. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 according to their academic qualifica- 7 D. all the case subjects were men who 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 tions to different grades had worked with asbestos. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. A professor’s declaring the result of 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 34. The case of six young women with 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 her student’s research “inconclusive” 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 cervical cancer (lines 47–49) is an example 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 due to lack of sufficient environmen- 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 of a cluster that has a: 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 tal variables 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 F. high background rate and small size. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 37. Health officials tend to discount the work 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. low background rate and is nonspe1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 of citizens involved in mapping cancer 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 cific. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 clusters partly because citizens often: 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. high background rate and is fairly 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 A. fail to investigate the background of specific. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 individual case subjects. J. low background rate and is fairly 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. fail to gather data from a broad specific. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 enough geographical area. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 35. Based on the information in the second 1 C. overemphasize individual characteris- 7 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 paragraph (lines 21–43), which of the tics of the cases. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 following can most reasonably be inferred D. discount occupational hazards 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 about cancer and birth defects? specific to each case. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 A. The size of the cluster of people 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 38. It can be reasonably inferred from the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 affected is similar in both. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 information in the second paragraph (lines 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. Both are caused by the same virus. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 21–43) that one of the highest background 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. Cancer victims and people with birth 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 rates in cancer studies is for: 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 defects have similar backgrounds. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 F. cervical cancer. D. Both are impossible to transmit by 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. lung cancer. contact. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. breast cancer. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. bone cancer. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 41 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 40. At the end of the passage, the author 39. The author’s main objective in the passage 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 concludes that: is to: 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 F. community cancer clusters are viewed 7 A. discuss the response of epidemiolo1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 differently by citizen activists, who gists to a cancer threat in a commu1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 are hindered by preconceptions, than 7 nity. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 by health officials. B. inform the reader of Lorraine Pace’s 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. the efforts of ordinary citizens can activism in West Islip. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 help scientists determine the causes of 7 C. discuss the difficulties involved in 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 community cancer clusters. identifying common causes of 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. health officials need the help of community cancer clusters. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 concerned citizens in order to D. explain the relevance of environmen1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 determine the causes of community tal agents in the study of community 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 cancer clusters. cancer clusters. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. local residents sometimes hinder the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 progress of scientific research by 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 pushing for a quick resolution. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 STOP 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 42 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. Science 40 Questions j Time—35 Minutes 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Directions: This test consists of seven passages, each followed by several questions. Read each 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 passage and select the best answer for each question following the passage. Then, on your 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 answer sheet, mark the oval corresponding to the best answer. You may NOT use a calculator on 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 this test. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Passage I 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Figure 1 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Lake ecosystems are highly sensitive to changes 1000 1.0 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 in acid-base balance, also referred to as pH 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 level. Growing concern over the last few 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 800 0 decades about increases in lake sulfate concen1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 trations and pH has led to an environmental 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 600 –1.0 campaign to reduce the amount of sulfates 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 released into the atmosphere from industrial 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 sources. To determine the impact of sulfates on 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 400 –2.0 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1900 1950 2000 some lake ecosystems, ecologists conducted two 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 experiments in a particular alpine area. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 In order to take into account changing 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Key: = Temperature 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 climatic parameters in the study area, the = Precipitation 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 researchers first looked at rainfall and tempera1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 ture since 1900. The results appear in Figure 1. Experiment 1 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Ecologists measured the terrestrial deposition 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 (land deposits) of sulfate at five alpine stations 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 located adjacent to five particular lakes 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 annually from 1993 to 2000. Sulfate was 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 measured in soil and rock samples. The 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 averages for two-year sampling periods appear 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 in Table 1 on page 43. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Mean Annual Precipitation (mm) Temperature ( C) Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 43 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Table 1 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Sulphate Concentration (Mg/L) 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Lakes 1993–94 1995–96 1997–98 1999–2000 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 0.65 0.60 0.60 0.59 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 0.60 0.59 0.58 0.50 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 3 0.82 0.82 0.80 0.69 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 4 0.89 0.69 0.66 0.66 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 5 0.68 0.65 0.67 0.69 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2. The results of experiment 2 show that, Experiment 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 from 1993 to 2000, pH levels: 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 In 2000, researchers looked at the sulfate 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 F. remained stable in the non-glacial 1 concentrations (in equivalents/L) and pH in the 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 lakes but increased in the glacial lakes adjacent to the alpine stations and 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 lakes. compared them to concentrations recorded in 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. decreased in the glacial lakes but the same lakes in 1993. Results appear in 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 decreased in the non-glacial lakes. Figure 2. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 H. increased in the non-glacial lakes but 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Figure 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 pH decreased in the glacial lakes. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 8 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Key: J. increased in the non-glacial lakes 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 = glacial lake 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 7 while remaining relatively stable in 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 = nonglacial lake 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the glacial lakes. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 6 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 3. The data collected from Experiments 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 5 6 7 8 and 2 show: 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2000 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 A. no clear trend in sulfate concentra1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Sulphate 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 900 tion among terrestrial deposits, but 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 increasing sulfate concentrations in 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 600 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the lakes. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 300 B. increasing sulfate concentration 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 among terrestrial deposits, but 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 0 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 decreasing sulfate concentrations in 0 300 600 900 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 (uequiv./L) 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the lakes. 2000 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. no clear trend in sulfate-concentra1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 tion levels either among terrestrial 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1. At which alpine station did terrestrial 1 deposits or among the lakes. 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 sulfate concentration remain the most D. increasing sulfate concentrations 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 stable over the study period? among terrestrial deposits, but no 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 clear trend in sulfate-concentration 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 A. The station adjacent to lake 1 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 levels in the lakes. 1 B. The station adjacent to lake 3 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. The station adjacent to lake 4 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. The station adjacent to lake 5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 44 1993 (uequiv./L) 1993 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 5. Based on the experimental data, which of 7 4. Which of the following hypotheses do the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the following conclusions is the most experimental data best support? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 reasonable one? F. Increasing precipitation levels bring 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 A. Industrial sulfate affects pH levels to 7 increasing amounts of airborne 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 a greater extent than naturally sulfate emissions into the lakes. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 occurring sulfate. G. Increasing air temperatures have the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 B. Sufficiently warm water temperatures 7 effect of increasing pH levels in the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 are needed in order for sulfate to lakes, which in turn increase sulfate1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 affect the pH levels in lake water. concentration levels in the lakes. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. In lake water, pH levels are sensitive H. The melting of glacial ice due to 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 to sulfate concentration levels. gradually increasing air temperatures 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. In lake water, sulfate concentration increases the amount of sulfates in 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 levels have little or no impact on lake water. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 pH levels. J. Wide variations in precipitation levels 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 contribute to wide variations among 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Passage II 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the lakes in both pH and sulfate1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 concentration levels. 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 Spacecraft such as the Mariner 10 in the 1970s 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 and the Voyagers in the 1990s successfully 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 passed at close range to nearly all the known 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 planets in our Solar System, providing new 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 information about them that we otherwise 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 would not know. Table 1 shows data collected 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 during these missions as well as other data 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 already known about the planets. Some of the 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 numbers are approximations only. A planet’s 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 rotational period is the time it takes to turn 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Table 1 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Mean Average 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Surface Rotational Distance Average 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Temp. Period Orbital From Sun Terrestrial Density 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Description (water 51) (millions of miles) (Earth days) Eccentricity (°C) Bodies 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Mercury 5.4 36 59 .206 179 Rocky, ferrous 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Venus 5.2 67 243 .007 480 Rocky, ferrous 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Earth 5.5 93 24 hrs .017 22 Rocky, ferrous 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Mars 3.9 142 25 hrs .093 223 Rocky 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Jupiter 1.3 484 9 hrs .048 2150 Gaseous 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Saturn 0.7 887 10 hrs .056 2180 Gaseous 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Uranus 1.2 1,783 11 hrs .047 2210 Icy, gaseous 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Neptune 1.7 2,794 16 hrs .009 2220 Icy, gaseous 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 Pluto 1 3,600 6 .25 2230 Icy, rocky, gaseous 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 45 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 7. The data provided in Table 1 on page 45 once on its axis, completing one planetary day. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 show that: A planet’s orbital eccentricity is the percent 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 difference between an elliptical path’s longest A. Jupiter has the shortest rotational 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 axis and shortest axis. A perfectly circular orbit period and the third highest orbital 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 would have an orbital eccentricity of zero (0). 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 eccentricity. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. Pluto has the lowest average density 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 The following figure is a plot of the densities 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 and the highest orbital eccentricity. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 and diameters of the terrestrial (nongaseous) 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 C. Earth has the highest average density 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 planets. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 and the fifth longest rotational 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 6 Earth 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 period. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. Mercury has the highest average Mercury 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Venus 5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 density and the highest orbital 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 eccentricity. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 4 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Density 8. The planet with an average density closest 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 Mars (gm/cm ) 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 to that of water is: 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 3 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 F. Uranus. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. Saturn. 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. Pluto. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. Mercury. 1 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 9. On Mercury, one year (the time it takes to 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 0 orbit once around the sun) is about 88 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 0 2 4 6 8 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Diameter Earth days. How many full rotations does 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 (thousands of miles) 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Mercury complete in one Mercury year? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 A. 1 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 6. Which of the following statements is best 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. 6 1 supported by the data in Table 1 on 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. 59 page 45? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. It cannot be determined from the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 F. Gaseous planets tend to have higher 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 information given. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 orbital eccentricities than non1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 gaseous planets. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. Planets that rotate slowly tend to 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 have higher surface temperatures 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 than other planets. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. Planets with low densities tend to 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 rotate more slowly than high-density 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 planets. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. The gravity of the Sun operates to 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 reduce orbital eccentricity. 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 3 46 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 10. The data presented suggest that there is: Table 1 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Average Concentrations of Dissolved F. a direct linear relationship between 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Substances in Bulk Precipitation and density and diameter among all of the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Stream Water in 6 Undisturbed terrestrial planets except Mercury. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Experimental Watersheds G. a direct linear relationship between 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 density and diameter among all of the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Precipi- Stream Percent 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 terrestrial planets. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Substance tation Water Change 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. a direct linear relationship between 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 Calcium 0.21 1.51 2619% 7 density and diameter among the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Magnesium 0.05 0.37 2640% 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 terrestrial planets but not among the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 Potassium 0.10 0.23 2130% 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 gaseous planets. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 Sodium 0.12 0.94 2683% 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. no clear relationship between density 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 Aluminum 0.01 0.24 22,300% 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 and diameter among the terrestrial 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 Ammonium 0.22 0.05 340% 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 planets. Sulfate 3.10 6.20 2100% 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 Nitrate 1.30 1.14 12% 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 11. Although Venus has a higher mean surface 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 Chloride 0.42 0.64 252% 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 temperature than Mercury, the average 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Dissolved 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 high temperatures on the surface of Venus 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 Silica 0.03 4.59 215,300% 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 are less than those on Mercury. Which of 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Notes: Data is given in kilograms per dry weight of 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 the following is the most reasonable 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 materials per hectar of the watershed. Basin-caught materi- 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 explanation for this apparent contradicals are coarse, net-caught materials are fine, and filter- 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 caught materials are super-fine. tion? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 The first task was to estimate the average 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 A. Mercury’s average density is greater 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 nutrient flow within the entire forest area. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 than that of Venus. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Table 1 above shows their estimate based on six 7 1 B. Mercury is closer to the Sun than 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 experimental areas chosen within the forest. Venus. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Nutrients enter the forest ecosystem via C. Mercury’s rotational period is less 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 precipitation, so rain gauges were set up in than that of Venus. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 various locations in the study areas. Nutrients D. Mercury’s orbital eccentricity is 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 exit the ecosystem through runoff from streams 7 greater than that of Venus. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 and rivers, so the ecologists measured stream 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Passage III flows in the designated areas. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 The state forestry commission engaged a group 1 After estimating the overall nutrient flow in this 7 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 of ecologists to study the nutrient flow in a forest, the ecologists had one 15-hectare* area 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 forest on federal lands that was being considcleared of trees in order to determine the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 ered for lease to a logging company. They were amount of increase that would occur in runoff. 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 also asked to study the effects of clear-cutting in The trees were removed from the area, but 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 selected areas to predict what the long-term nothing else was disturbed. For the first two 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 effects on the nutrient budget might be. The 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 scientists selected several small sections of the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 forest for observation and experiment. *A hectare is a metric unit of measure equal to 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2.471 acres. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 47 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Table 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Annual Losses of Particulate Matter 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Watershed 1 Watershed 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Undisturbed Area Deforested Area 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Source of Output Year Organic Inorganic Organic Inorganic 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Ponding Basin 1 4.62 8.30 35.41 158.32 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Net 1 0.43 0.02 0.26 0.01 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Filter 1 2.64 2.80 4.23 4.80 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Ponding Basin 2 11.39 31.00 45.13 321.88 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Net 2 0.43 0.02 0.25 0.03 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Filter 2 3.32 3.70 6.24 7.10 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Ponding Basin 3 3.83 5.78 53.72 540.32 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Net 3 0.42 0.01 0.27 0.04 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Filter 3 2.61 2.97 8.73 12.98 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 Notes: Data is given in kilograms per dry weight of materials per hectar of the watershed. Basin-caught materials are coarse, 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 net-caught materials are fine, and filter-caught materials are super-fine. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 13. The data provide LEAST support for years after the logging, an herbicide was 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 which of the following hypotheses about applied so that no vegetation would grow back. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the impact of clear-cutting a forest The ecologists then compared this cleared 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 ecosystem during the first three years after 7 watershed with one of the intact watersheds 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 deforestation? under study. They measured the stream flow for 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the first three years after the logging took place. A. Clear-cutting has the effect of 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Table 2 above summarizes the amounts of increasing the amount of coarse 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 organic and inorganic matter found at the 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 particulate matter that exits the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 watershed basin. A net and filter system was 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 ecosystem. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 utilized to catch finer matter as the runoff 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. Clear-cutting has the effect of 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 exited the watershed area. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 increasing the loss of super-fine 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 particulate matter that exits the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 12. Based on the experimental data collected, ecosystem. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the forest appears to be experiencing a C. Clear-cutting has little effect on the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 net: amount of fine particulate matter 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 that exits the ecosystem. F. loss in all measured nutrients. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. Clear-cutting has the effect of G. loss in all but two measured nutri1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 increasing the loss of organic matter ents. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 but not inorganic matter. H. gain in all but two measured nutri1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 ents. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. gain in all measured nutrients. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 48 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 16. Which of the following forecasts for the 14. Which of the following claims is best 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 longer-term nutrient budget in the two supported by the data in Table 2 on 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 15-hectare areas compared in Table 2 on page 48? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 page 48 is most reasonable? F. The undisturbed watershed area 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 F. Nutrient losses in the deforested area 7 received more precipitation during 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 will slowly decline while nutrient Year 2 than during either Year 1 or 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 losses in the undisturbed area will Year 3. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 increase. G. The deforested watershed area 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 G. Both the undisturbed and deforested 7 contains a greater amount of organic 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 areas will experience increasing losses 7 matter than inorganic matter. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 of nutrients. H. The herbicide applied to the defor1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 H. Nutrient losses in the deforested area 7 ested area did not effect the amount 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 will slowly increase while nutrient of organic matter exiting that area. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 losses in the undisturbed area will J. Before the removal of any trees, the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 slowly decrease. undisturbed watershed area con1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. Nutrient losses in the undisturbed tained less inorganic matter than the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 area will remain stable over the area where the trees were cleared. 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 longer term while nutrient losses in 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 15. Assuming that sodium is naturally found the deforested area will slowly 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 primarily as a fine material rather than decline. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 either a coarse or super-fine material, 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 17. Which of the following, if true, would which of the following conclusions is best 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 most seriously call into question any supported by the data? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 conclusions about the entire forest’s 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 A. In the deforested area, less sodium 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 nutrient budget based on the data in 1 was lost during Year 2 than during 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Table 1 on page 47? Year 3. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 A. The total precipitation in the six B. In the deforested area, less sodium 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 experimental areas is significantly less 7 was lost during Year 1 than during 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 than the total precipitation in the Year 2. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 remaining areas of the forest. C. In the undisturbed area, about the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 B. The average precipitation per hectare 7 same amount of sodium was lost 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 is less in the six experimental areas during all three years. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 than in the remaining areas of the D. In the undisturbed area, less sodium 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 forest. was lost during Year 2 than during 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. The forest’s streams and rivers run Year 3. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 mainly through the six experimental 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 areas. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. In the experimental areas, soil 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 nutrients are found in proportions 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 that differ from their proportions in 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 other areas of the forest. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 49 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 offspring that is smaller than the male would Passage IV 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 like and larger than the female would like. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Biologists have discovered certain genes (the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Anti-Cancer Theory basic unit of genetic material found on the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 chromosomes) that behave very differently 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 This theory holds that imprinted genes evolved 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 depending on whether they are passed down to 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 to prevent cancer. The genes have been found in 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 offspring from the father or the mother. These 1 the placenta (an organ that develops to nourish 7 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 genes, called imprinted genes, are chemically a growing fetus). Placental tissue grows and 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 altered in cells that give rise to eggs and sperm. burrows into the uterus, where the fetus 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 These alterations result in dramatically different develops. The ability to grow and invade tissues 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 properties. In the imprinted genes that have is also seen in aggressive cancers. Imprinted 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 been most fully studied, the female alters the genes might have developed to ensure that the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 gene so that certain proteins are not produced. potentially dangerous placenta will not develop 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 The protein remains active in the father’s genes. if there is no fetus to nourish. The female might 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Researchers have posed numerous theories to inactivate certain growth genes in her eggs, 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 explain the evolution of imprinted genes. Three while the sperm kept them turned on. If no 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 of the theories are presented below. 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 fertilization took place, the growth would not 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 occur. If a sperm did join the egg, the male’s Competing Parental Interest Theory 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 gene would ensure that the protein developed. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Some biologists think that imprinted genes 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 evolved in a battle between the sexes to Protein Control Theory 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 determine the size of offspring. It is to the 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 A third group of biologists holds that imprinted 7 genetic advantage of the female to rear a 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 genes developed to ensure the precise regulation 7 number of offspring, all of which will pass 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 of certain proteins. Genes do their work by along her genetic material. Consequently, while 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 initiating the production of different proteins. she wants each offspring to be healthy, she does 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 Some proteins involved in the growth of 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 not want them to be so large that the strain of 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 embryos may need to be regulated with great 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 feeding and/or delivering them would jeopar1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 precision to ensure the healthy development of 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 dize her ability to bear future babies. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the offspring. Proponents of the protein control 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 Conversely, it is to the genetic advantage of 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 theory suggest that this careful regulation might 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 males in non-monogamous species (species that 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 be easier if only one parent is involved. Thus, 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 do not always mate for life) to have the mother 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 one parent might turn off such genes, leaving 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 expend as much of her resources as possible to 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the regulation to the other. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 ensure the health of his offspring. He is not 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 concerned with her ability to bear future 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 offspring, since these will not necessarily be 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 fathered by him (and, therefore, will not be 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 transmitting his genetic material). Hence, 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 imprinted genes have developed in this parental 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 tug-of-war. Normally, each offspring receives 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 one copy of an imprinted gene from the father 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 and one from the mother. The changes that the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 parents make in their genes result in an 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 50 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 20. Supporters of the competing parental 18. Which of the following experimental 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 interest theory assume that: findings poses the most serious difficulties 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 for proponents of the anti-cancer theory? F. only females have an interest in 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 regulating the size of their offspring. 7 F. When a mouse was genetically 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. only males have an interest in engineered so that it contained two 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 ensuring the health and survival of copies of every gene from its mother 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 their offspring. only, the embryo was unable to 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. both males and females have an develop. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 interest in producing as many G. Research in animals that lay eggs has 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 offspring of their own sex as possible. 7 never turned up an imprinted gene. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. both males and females have an H. Imprinted genes have been found in 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 interest in transmitting their genetic plants, which have no placentas. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 material to as many offspring as J. Research has shown that imprinted 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 possible. genes have not evolved rapidly as 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 they usually do in competitive 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 21. Supporters of all three theories would 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 situations. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 agree that: 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 19. Supporters of the protein control theory 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 A. imprinted genes evolved as a means 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 believe that: 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 of regulating reproduction-related 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 events. A. imprinted genes are used to regulate 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. imprinted genes should be absent in crucial proteins. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 non-placental animals (animals B. imprinted genes are active only in 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 whose offspring develop without a females. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 placenta). C. imprinted genes should not be found 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 C. if an embryo is formed without in monogamous species (ones that 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 female-imprinted genes, the future mate for life). 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 ability of the mother to bear offD. only the male passes down imprinted 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 spring will be jeopardized. genes to the offspring. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. imprinted genes should always be 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 turned off in the mother. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 51 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 24. Researchers conducted breeding studies 22. Which of the following findings is best 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 with two species of mice. Species A was explained by the competing parental 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 monogamous, while Species B was not. interest theory? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Supporters of the competing parental F. An imprinted gene has been discov1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 interest theory hypothesized that the 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 ered in humans that appears to 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 monogamous species was unlikely to have 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 influence a child’s social skills. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 active imprinted genes (since the fathers 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. In the imprinted genes that have been 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 would have the same genetic stake in all 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 most fully studied, the female turns 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the offspring born). Which of the follow1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the gene off, while the male’s gene 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 ing experimental results would they 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 remains active. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 expect? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. Studies with a monogamous mouse 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 F. When females from Species A were species indicate that imprinted genes 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 bred with males from Species B, the are not active. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 resulting offspring were extremely J. One of the imprinted genes studied is 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 small. known to control a growth-stimulat1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. When females from Species A were ing hormone. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 bred with males from Species B, the 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 23. In a rare pregnancy disorder called resulting offspring were extremely 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 hydatidiform mole, an abnormal cluster of large. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 cells grows in place of the placenta. This H. When females from Species B were 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 cluster grows so large that there is no bred with males from Species A, the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 room for the development of the fetus. resulting offspring were extremely 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 The embryo in such pregnancies has been large. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 found to carry only the father’s genes. J. The offspring of Species B mice were 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 This fact could be used to support: consistently smaller than the off1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 spring of Species A mice. I. The competing parental interest 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 theory 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 II. The anti-cancer theory 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 III. The protein control theory 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 A. I only 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. II only 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. II and III only 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. I, II, and III 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 52 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 of the resulting waves was measured, and the Passage V 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 frequency response curves in the following Electrical circuits that allow electrical signals 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 figure were obtained. with some frequencies (number of waves per 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Type 3 second) to pass while suppressing others are 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2.0V called filters. They are used in nearly every 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Type 1 Type 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 electronic device, from computers to VCRs. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1.5V 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 They may contain resistors, which resist the 1 Amplitude 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 (Volts) flow of current through a wire, inductors, 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1.0V 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 which resist change in the current, and capaci1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 tors, which store electric charge. The following 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 0.5V 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 figure shows the design of three types of filters. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Filter Type 1 Key: 0V 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Sine Sine 1.0KHz 10KHz 100KHz 1.0MHz 10MHz 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 = capacitor wave wave 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Frequency (Hertz) out in 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 = resistor 1 K=1000 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 = inductor 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 M=1 Million 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 = ground Filter Type 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Sine Sine 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Experiment 2 wave wave 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 out in A sine wave with an amplitude fixed at 2.0 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 volts was fed into a circuit with a type 3 filter, 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 but in this experiment the researchers used four 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 different values for the inductance (L). The 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Filter Type 3 Sine Sine 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 resulting frequency response curves are shown 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 wave wave 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 out in in the following figure. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 L=10mH 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 L=1mH L=.1mH L=.01mH 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2.0V 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 1.5V 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Amplitude The effects of a filter can be demonstrated with 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 (Volts) 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 a frequency response curve. Such a curve 1.0V 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 depicts the amplitude (wave height) of the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 output (vertical axis) as one varies the input 0.5V 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 frequency (horizontal axis), while keeping the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 input amplitude constant. Several experiments 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 0V 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1.0KHz 10KHz 100KHz 1.0MHz 10MHz were conducted to test the effects of some 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Frequency (Hertz) 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 filters. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Experiment 1 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Researchers fed sine waves (oscillating voltage) 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 into an electrical circuit containing the three 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 filters depicted in the figure above. The input 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 amplitude was fixed at 2.0 volts. The amplitude 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 53 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 27. Which of the following best explains why Experiment 3 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 a type 3 filter was selected for experiments 7 1 Again, the researchers fed a sine wave with an 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 and 3? amplitude fixed at 2.0 volts into a circuit with a 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 A. The frequency response varied more type 3 filter. The inductance was held at 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 widely when filter type 3 was used 0.1mH, while four different values of capaci1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 than when either Filter type 1 or tance C were used. The resulting frequency 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Filter type 2 was used. response curves are shown in the following 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. Filter type 3 contains a ground and figure. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 was therefore the safest of the three C=1uF C=.1uF C=.01uF 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C=.001uF 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 types of filters to experiment with. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2.0V 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. Filter type 3 is the only one among 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the three that contains an inductor. 1.5V 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Amplitude 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. Input voltage could be more easily 1 (Volts) 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1.0V regulated using a type 3 filter than 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 using either a type 1 or type 2 filter. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 0.5V 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 28. Increasing the inductance level for filter 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 0V 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 type 3 has the effect of: 1.0KHz 10KHz 100KHz 1.0MHz 10MHz 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Frequency (Hertz) 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 F. increasing the output amplitude of 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the electrical circuit. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 25. Which of the following was a control in G. decreasing the average frequency of 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 all three experiments? sine waves that pass through the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 circuit. A. Input frequency 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. reducing the range of sine-wave B. Input amplitude 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 frequencies that pass through the 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. Inductance 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 circuit. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. Capacitance 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. increasing the output frequency of 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the electrical circuit. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 26. Using a type 3 filter and an inductance of 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1mH, what is the approximate output 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 amplitude at an input frequency of 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 100KHz? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 F. 1.9 volts 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. 1.5 volts 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. 1.0 volts 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. 75 volts 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 54 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 two copies of the disease gene, one from each 29. Based on information given in the three 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 parent. An individual who is passed one copy experiments, which of the following can 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 of the disease gene is called a healthy carrier. we assume to be true? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 He or she will not have the disease, but can still 7 A. The higher the capacitance, the wider 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 pass the gene on to an offspring. Figure 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the peak in the frequency response 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 shows a family with this type of genetic disease. 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 curve. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Figure 1 B. The lower the capacitance, the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Key: D = disease gene narrower the peak in the frequency 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 d = normal gene 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 response curve. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 = female 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. The higher the inductance, the Recessive = male 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Inheritance 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 narrower the peak in the frequency 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 response curve. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 D. The higher the capacitance, the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 narrower the peak in the frequency 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 response curve. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 30. In the design of a radio receiver containing 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 a type 3 filter, a low capacitance level and 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 a high inductance level would be most 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 useful for the purpose of: 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 In a disease with a dominant inheritance 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 F. enhancing radio reception across the pattern, any individual with a copy of the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 frequency spectrum. disease gene will have the disease. (Depending 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 G. tuning out signals at high and low on the disease, individuals with two copies may 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 frequencies. have an accelerated or more severe disease 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 H. tuning in a radio station at a fixed 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 course, or may be unable to survive.) There is 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 frequency. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 no such thing as a healthy carrier with this type 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. minimizing unwanted audio noise at 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 of disease. Figure 2 shows a family with this 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 middle frequencies. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 type of genetic disease. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Figure 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Passage VI 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Key: D = disease gene 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 d = normal gene 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Individuals usually have two copies of each gene 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 = female 1 (the basic unit of genetic material, found on the 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Dominant = male 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Inheritance chromosomes), one from their mother and one 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 from their father. Genetic or inherited diseases 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 are those that can be passed down to the next 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 generation through the genes. These diseases 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 follow a number of patterns. Two of the basic 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 ones are dominant and recessive inheritance. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 In a genetic disease with a recessive 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 inheritance pattern, an individual will not be 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 affected by the disease unless he or she is passed 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Generation Generation Generation 3 2 1 Dd Dd DD dd Dd Dd dd Dd dd Dd Dd dd* DD dd Dd Dd Dd dd Generation Generation Generation 3 2 1 dd Dd dd Dd dd dd dd dD* dD Dd Dd Dd dd* dd Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 55 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 34. In Figure 2 on page 55, among all the 31. In Figure 1 on page 55, which shows a 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 children and grandchildren of the male recessive inheritance pattern, which of the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 and female at generation 1, how many following about the parents of generation 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 have the disease? 2 is true? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 F. Three A. Neither parent was passed a copy of 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. Four the disease gene. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. Six B. Both parents were passed two copies 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J. It cannot be determined from the of the disease gene. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 information given. C. Both parents were passed one copy of 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the disease gene. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 35. Pamela is a young mother whose parents D. Neither parent is capable of passing 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 are both deceased. Assuming that disease the disease gene to the next 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 X is a genetic disorder with either a 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 generation. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 dominant or a recessive inheritance 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 pattern, which of the following statements 7 32. With respect only to the individuals 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 is accurate? shown in Figure 1 on page 55, it CAN1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 NOT be true that a: 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 A. If neither of Pamela’s parents ever 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 had disease X, then Pamela does not F. child of a person without a copy of 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 and never will have disease X. the disease gene has the disease. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. If neither Pamela nor the father of G. child of a person with the disease 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Pamela’s child has disease X, then gene will never contract the disease. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 that child will never have disease X. H. child of two healthy carriers has 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. If both of Pamela’s parents had at the disease. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 least one copy of the disease X gene, J. parent of a healthy carrier is also a 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 then Pamela also has at least one healthy carrier. 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 copy of the disease X gene. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 33. In Figure 2 on page 55, what is the D. If neither of Pamela’s parents ever had 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 probability that the female marked with disease X, but Pamela has disease X, 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 an asterisk in generation 3 will pass the then disease X is not a dominantly 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 disease on to her child? inherited genetic disorder. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 A. 0% 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. 25% 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. 50% 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 D. It cannot be determined from the 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 information given. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 56 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Winter Spring Summer Fall 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Chemist: Seawater Salinity*/Temperature (°C) (Seasonal Average) 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Surface 0/21° 25/1° 32/12° 15/2° 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 5 meters deep 0/21° 29/5° 32/7° 26/7° 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 20 meters deep 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 (ocean floor) 39/4° 32/5° 32/6° 34/5° 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Biologist: Population Counts (Seasonal Average) 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Bay (free-swimming) 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Fur seals 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 (number successfully hunted) 6.3 3.0 5.4 2.2 7 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Salmon 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 (tonnage caught) 0 122.5 1,152.6 4,259.5 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Gray whales 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 (number observed) 0 29.8 32.4 1.4 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Bay (bottom-dwelling amphipods) 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Gammarus duebeni 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 (sample count in one gallon of seawater) 50 25 15 60 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Gammarus locusta 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 (sample count in one gallon of seawater) 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Land species 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Kodiak Bears 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 (number observed) 0 4 22 21 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Humans 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 (number counted) 63 66 85 117 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Doctor: Number of Medical Complaints (Seasonal Average) 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 Dehydration-related illnesses 0.0 0.0 3.4 0.9 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Bear attacks 0.0 0.2 1.1 2.2 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 Protein deficiency-related illnesses 10.4 4.1 1.0 0.0 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 36. Which of the following statement about Passage VII 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the water in the bay does the chemist’s 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 A chemist, a biologist, and a doctor spent 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 salinity and temperature readings best 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 several years studying and measuring their 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 support? 1 respective populations in an Alaskan fishing 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 F. The deeper the water, the lower the community. Some of their observations are 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 temperature. recorded above. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 G. The greater the water temperature, 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the higher the salinity. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. The shallower the water, the lower 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the salinity. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 J. The lower the water temperature, the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 lower the salinity. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 57 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 39. Which of the following statements is best 37. An animal species is said to be thriving if 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 supported by the evidence? its population is increasing. Assuming that 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 free-swimming water animals are generA. Gammarus locusta are more sensitive 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 ally found at the surface or within 5 to salinity changes than gammarus 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 meters from the surface of the bay’s 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 duebent. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 waters, the chemist’s and the biologist’s 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 B. Gammarus locusta and gammarus 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 measurements provide some support for 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 duebent are equally sensitive to water 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 all of the following hypotheses EXCEPT: 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 temperature changes. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 C. Gammarus duebent are more A. fur seals thrive as water temperatures 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 sensitive to water temperature decrease. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 changes than gammarus locusta. B. gray whales thrive as salinity levels 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 D. Gammarus locusta are more sensitive 7 increase. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 to salinity changes but less sensitive C. gray whales thrive as water tempera1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 to water temperature changes than tures increase. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 gammarus duebent. D. salmon thrive as salinity levels 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 increase. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 40. The doctor wants to reduce the number of 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 protein deficiency-related illnesses among 38. Among the following, which is LEAST 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the village’s human population. Which of likely to be a contributing cause of the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the following would probably be the protein deficiency-related diseases 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 doctor’s best course of action? observed by the doctor? 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 F. Stock the bay with more salmon to F. The local human population depends 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 compensate for the absence of gray primarily on seal meat for their 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 whales during the winter. protein consumption. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 G. Introduce methods of preserving G. Virtually all of the bay’s salmon are 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 meat and fish for later consumption. caught by commercial fishermen who 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 H. Remove the bears from the area to transport the salmon elsewhere for 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 reduce the local villagers’ competition 7 sale. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 for food. H. It is difficult to catch a gray whale in 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 J. Introduce modern fishing methods to 7 waters hidden beneath ice. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the local fishermen. J. Local religious customs prohibit the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 consumption of bear meat unless the 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 meat is fresh. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 58 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. Answers and Explanations 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 English 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1. A The original phrasing is a proper way to express the idea of a choir consisting of girls but no 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 boys. In choice B, only and just are redundant. Choice C is confusing, while choice D uses 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 and where but would be appropriate. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 2. J The idiom for every (one) . . . there are (ten) is perfectly appropriate here. However, the word 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 boys’ sounds awkward without the word choirs after it. Choice J supplies this word and 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 adds the word either, which makes the sentence’s meaning even clearer. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 3. A The underlined phrase is grammatically correct and clearly conveys the idea that the Boys 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Choir already existed in 1977, when the Girls Choir was founded. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 4. H The present-perfect tense should be used here, to match the clause following the comma and 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 because the time frame involves not just the past but also the present. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 5. D The phrase since 1968 should be set off because the sentence can stand alone without it. One 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 way to set off the phrase is with parentheses. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 6. G If you read the sentence as a whole, you see that it lists two distinct performances. Each one 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 should receive similar grammatical and rhetorical emphasis. But, the underlined portion 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 subordinates the first clause to what follows the comma. Choice G fixes the problem. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 7. D In the original sentence, the phrase they sung awkwardly splits the description of the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 location. Also, the phrase in front is used twice in the description, which sounds repetitive. 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Choice D solves both problems. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 8. F At the end of the preceding paragraph, the writer notes two of the grand venues where the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Boys Choir has performed. The sentence in choice F alludes to that point while deftly 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 transitioning to the discussion of the Girls Choir that follows. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 9. B A choir is said to perform either to, in front of, or before an audience, not toward or at an 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 audience. Choice B provides one of the idioms that works here. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 10. G Without a comma between the two underlined words, the sentence suggests that the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 thousands of music lovers were also dignitaries, which in all likelihood is not what the writer 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 intended to suggest. Choice G supplies the comma that sets off the mayor’s wife, identifying 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 her (but not the music lovers) as one of the dignitaries. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 11. C If you switch the sentence’s two clauses, you can see that the sentence boils down to this: The 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 choirs act as havens by giving kids new confidence and hope. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 59 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 12. F The preceding sentence indicates that the school strongly emphasizes singing, while the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 following sentences suggest that the school sparks student interest in various non-music 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 professional careers. Choice F provides a nice transition from one idea to the other. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 13. C As it stands, the sentence contradicts itself. The writer is trying to say that these jobs now 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 appear in reach, whereas earlier they seemed out of reach—as choice C indicates. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 14. J The underlined portion refers to the Girls Choir, not to its performances. It’s inappropriate 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 to talk about a choir as either being canceled, choice F, or closing its doors, choice G. On the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 other hand, it makes perfect sense to say that a choir might go silent without sufficient 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 funding. Although the phrase stop what they do also makes sense, go silent is a more artful, 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 graceful phrase. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 15. C The writer has been asked to describe the choir’s musical achievements. The essay explains 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 a bit about the choir’s history and its importance in the lives of its members, but it really 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 doesn’t describe their musical achievements. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 16. J The correct idiomatic expression here is waiting to see. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 17. C The clause following the underlined portion elucidates, or explains, what is meant by the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 trap described in the first part of the sentence. A dash, and not a colon, is the appropriate 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 mark for this purpose. (A comma would also be appropriate.) The pronoun them is correct 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 here because it refers to the plural noun technologies. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 18. F The phrase he or she is singular, matching the singular subject leader. Choices G and J are 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 wrong because they use plural noun forms. Choice H is awkward and confusing. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 19. B The purpose of the sentence in which the underlined portion appears is to underscore and 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 support the idea in the previous sentence. The connecting phrase that choice B provides (In 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 fact,) helps the reader understand the connection between the two sentences. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 20. J In this sentence, the first clause and the second clause (following the comma) both employ 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 the past-perfect tense. The result is that it’s impossible to tell which event came first—the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 one described in the first clause or the one described in the second clause. Only choice J 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 clears up the ambiguity. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 21. B The adverb seemingly should not be separated from the adjective it modifies (unassailable). 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 One way to fix this problem is to simply reverse the words seemingly and was. Another way 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 is to replace the underlined phrase with the one that choice B provides. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 22. G The underlined sentence would be the ideal topic sentence for Paragraph 3 and therefore 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 should begin that paragraph rather than end Paragraph 2. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 23. D The simple past tense (became) makes the most sense here in light of the next two sentences, 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 which provide details—using the simple past tense—about the development described in the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 first sentence. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 24. F The reflexive verb itself is appropriately used here to indicate how Wang survived. Choice J 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 retains the reflexive itself, but the use of the infinitive to transform distorts the meaning of 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the sentence. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 60 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 25. A The underlined clause clearly and properly modifies computer company and is grammati- 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 cally correct. Choice B is an awkward juxtaposition of company and a company. Choice C 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 contains a pronoun reference problem: To what does the noun their refer—Wang or the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 companies Wang served? Choice D is very awkward. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 26. H The phrase slip up is slang and does not fit the overall style of this essay. Of the three 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 alternatives, choice H makes the most sense in the context of the entire sentence. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 27. C The underlined portion is unnecessarily wordy; choice C provides the same idea, but 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 more concisely. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 28. F The sentence in choice F explains why Wang had lost its chance to move forward, fleshing 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 out the point the writer makes in the previous sentence. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 29. B The underlined phrase is an awkward way of saying that well-managed companies 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 sometimes fail for the reason cited in the sentence. Choice B provides a clearer way of 7 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 making the point. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 30. J Each of the two paragraphs—1 and 5—makes either a suitable introductory or concluding 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 paragraph for this essay. However, Paragraph 5 provides a far more effective transition to 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 Paragraph 2. Thus, the essay would be more effective if Paragraphs 1 and 5 were switched. 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 31. C The word like is improperly used here; the writer is not seeking to compare learning the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 oboe to the experience of expecting. Choice C provides the correct idiom. Choice B and D 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 are correct in usage and grammar, but neither is so effective as choice C. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 32. F The colon is correctly used here to signal that what’s ahead essentially defines what was 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 just described. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 33. B The underlined portion employs the passive voice, which is very awkward and confusing 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 here. Choice B recasts the clause in the active voice. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 34. G In the two sentences, there’s a contrast of ideas that the writer seeks but fails to convey. 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Choice G supplies a connecting word that points out that contrast effectively. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 35. D What follows either should parallel what follows or, but it doesn’t (their teachers and from 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 mail order companies are not grammatically parallel). Choice D fixes the faulty parallelism. 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Choice B also fixes the problem, but it isn’t as precise as choice D. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 36. G The word that is needed between is and there’s to transform the portion of the sentence 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 beginning with there’s no such thing into a dependent clause. (The problem is that there’s. . . .) 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 37. A The point of the sentence that immediately precedes the proposed remark is that oboe reeds 7 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 are very expensive. Choice A provides objective, direct support for that point. It also relates 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 directly to the next sentence. (Both sentences involve a problem with purchasing reeds by 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 mail order.) 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 38. H The underlined phrase—For example—contributes nothing to the sentence. However, simply 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 omitting the phrase isn’t so effective as replacing it with the phrase In fact, which connects 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 the ideas in the two sentences together by underscoring the point that reed makers take their 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 time sending reeds to their customers. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 39. B The plural pronoun them should be used instead of the singular form it because the writer is 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 referring here to the plural noun reeds. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 61 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 40. J The word progressively already conveys the idea that the quality of the reeds worsened in a 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 series of steps. Repeating the word lower is unnecessary. Choice G fails to eliminate the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 redundancy, while choice H supplies the adjective poor where the comparative form 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 (poorer) would be needed. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 41. D The contraction they’re (they are) makes no sense here, and should be replaced with its, 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 which matches the singular source used elsewhere in the sentence to refer to the company in 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 California. 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 42. G The juxtaposition of the modifier Desperate and the sentence’s subject (the next person) 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 implies that it was the next person who was desperate, when in fact it was the writer who 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 was desperate. Choice G solves this misplaced-modifier problem by reconstructing the main 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 clause, positioning I (the writer) immediately after the modifier, as the sentence’s subject. 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 The clause in choice J accomplishes the same thing, but the position of the word next creates 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 confusion. (To whom or what does next refer?) 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 43. C The word however makes for an illogical and confusing connection between the last 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 sentence of Paragraph 5 and the first sentence of Paragraph 6. Without the word however, 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the transition is smooth and logical. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 44. J In the original sentence, the pronoun reference is ambiguous. (Does him refer to the friend or 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 the reed maker?) Choice J replaces the pronoun with the noun to which the writer probably 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 intends to refer (my friend). Although choice H also eliminates the ambiguity, it sounds 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 awkward at this point in the sentence. 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 45. A The writer’s persistence in searching for good reeds, along with the enjoyment the writer 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 indicated he gets out of playing the oboe, strongly supports the idea that the writer does not 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 plan to give up. The sentence in choice A is consistent with this idea and nicely ties together 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 all the information in the essay. Neither choice B nor choice C is so successful in embracing 7 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the entire essay. Choice D does nothing more than essentially repeat one of the statements in 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 Paragraph 1 and thus is less effective than choice A, which provides an additional insight: 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the writer’s evaluation of the whole experience. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 46. H The purpose of the underlined clause is to identify the specific time of autumn that the events 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 described later in the sentence occur. Choice H makes it clear that the writer is concerned 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 only with Thanksgiving, and not with autumn generally. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 47. B The two phrases to host friends . . . and preparing one of the . . . are not grammatically parallel. 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 One solution is to replace the infinitive to host with the gerund hosting—as choice B provides. 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 48. J A comma is needed here to separate the two distinct tasks discussed in the sentence. The 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 word and following the comma is optional. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 49. C The underlined portion contains the awkward and vague phrase there is. Also, the article a, 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 although acceptable here, is best omitted because the list that follows contains both plural 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 and singular nouns. Choice C solves both problems and is consistent with the rest of the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 paragraph, in which the writer uses the second-person you. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 50. G The passive voice is used in the underlined portion, but the active voice is used throughout 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 the rest of the sentence. Choice G recasts the phrase in the active voice, thereby avoiding the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 awkward shift from active to passive voice, then back to active voice. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 62 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 51. A The writer uses the idiom by comparison to appropriately and effectively here. Choice B is 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 acceptable, but it is not as concise as the original version. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 52. H The underlined portion is grammatically correct but leaves it a bit unclear as to who enjoyed 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the meal. Choice H makes it clearer that it was the Pilgrims who enjoyed the meal. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 53. B If commas were used in the place of semicolons, it would be difficult to distinguish between 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 categories such as fowl and seafood. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 54. H With the past tense wasn’t, either the underlined phrase or choices G or J would be correct. 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 But, the verb form weren’t (were not) establishes the subjunctive mood, which calls for an 7 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 idiom such as As if. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 55. A The writer has chosen a phrase here that is idiomatic and, by way of its style and structure, 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 very effective in making the point that the Pilgrims’ Thanksgiving meal carried on much, 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 much longer than the typical modern-day Thanksgiving dinner. 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 56. J At the end of the first paragraph, the essay indicates that there were significant differences 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 between the Pilgrims’ Thanksgiving and today’s typical Thanksgiving. Then, the essay’s 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 second paragraph begins with the following sentence: First, consider the menu. This 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 sentence is a clue that another major difference will be discussed later in the essay. In the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 paragraph at hand, the essay finally turns from the menu to another aspect of Thanksgiving 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 dinner: the guest list. Choice J provides a sentence that signals the transition from one to the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 other. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 57. D Adding a word such as total helps underscore the point that the guest list includes not just 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 immediate family but extended family as well. However, the underlined portion is awkward 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 and should be replaced with either total guests or guests altogether, as choice D provides. 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 58. G The first part of Paragraph 4 (preceding the underlined sentence) notes the many guests who 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 show up at today’s typical Thanksgiving dinner, while the portion of the paragraph 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 following the underlined sentence notes how many more guests there were at the first 7 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Thanksgiving. The sentence in choice G deftly links the two ideas. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 59. C The indirect object of invite is the phrase to a little pot-luck supper. (Squanto invited 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 Massasoit to a pot-luck supper.) For clarity, these two elements should be placed nearer to 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 each other. Choice C fixes the problem. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 60. F The concluding remark should underscore the essay’s main idea—that the first Thanksgiv- 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 ing was a much greater feat than today’s typical Thanksgiving—as well as tying together 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 both main areas of discussion: the extensive menu and the number of guests. Only choice F 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 accomplishes all this. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 61. D Although replacing movies with the possessive movies’ (as in their movies) would correct the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 underlined portion’s only grammatical error, the phrase is still awkward. Choice D provides 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 a clearer, more idiomatic alternative. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 62. H Since the sentence involves past events, you can eliminate choices F and J, each of which uses 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 the present-tense verb form is. Choice H fixes the error by replacing is with the past-tense 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 form of the verb lies. (It is idiomatic to say that the greatness of something lies in a certain 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 characteristic of that thing.) 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 63 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 63. B In the original sentence, emerged separates the sentence’s subject (a generation of 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 filmmakers) from its modifier who were not. . . . Choice B fixes the problem by 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 reconstructing the underlined portion. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 64. J In the original sentence, no other and with the exception of are redundant. Choices H and J 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 both solve the problem, but choice J is clearer and more concise than choice H. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 65. C Paragraph 1 ends by indicating one reason for the vitality and excitement surrounding 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 the early days of moviemaking. Paragraph 2 takes up a second reason. The word 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 Furthermore signals that another reason is coming, so it provides a good link between the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 two paragraphs. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 66. F The sentence employs the idiomatic correlative pair not for . . . but rather for. . . . What 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 follows not only is grammatically parallel to what follows but rather for. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 67. B The passive voice sounds awkward here. Choice B, which employs the active voice, sounds 7 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 more graceful. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 68. J The connecting word and would be correct here only if what followed it were an 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 independent clause. But, it’s a dependent clause. (Notice the use of the gerund running 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 rather than are running or run.). The preposition with renders the sentence grammati- 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 cally correct. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 69. C The word more is already supplied—immediately preceding the series of three adjectives—so, all 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 that’s needed here is the word stale. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 70. J Sentence 3 refers to the phenomenon described in sentence 1 and thus should immediately 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 follow that sentence. Sentences 2 and 4 provide details that support the assertion in sentence 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 3, so they should follow sentence 3. Sentences 2 and 4 might work in either order, but choice 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 J is the only one in which the sentences are otherwise arranged correctly. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 71. B The underlined word is grammatically correct here. The problem is that the sentence doesn’t 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 make its point effectively. Adding the word only is needed to make the point that the artist 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 whose audience is limited to the elite need not be concerned with satisfying the tastes of a 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 wide variety of people. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 72. G In the preceding sentence, the writer points out what strong painters can do. In the sentence 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 at hand, the writer seeks to compare great artists of the cinema to these painters. Choice G 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 provides a phrase that makes it clear that the comparison is being made. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 73. C From the paragraph’s first two sentences, you can infer that artists such as the ones listed 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 were able to create films that were uncompromising in their artistry because they were not 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 pressured to appeal to the masses. To link this idea to the following sentence, this point 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 should be made explicit, which is precisely what the sentence in choice C accomplishes. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 74. F The writer uses the parallel construction The larger . . . the greater. . . , which is idiomatic 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 and perfectly appropriate for conveying the idea here. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 75. A Since Paragraph 3 offers a conclusion based on the existence of financial pressures in today’s 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 movie industry, it’s logical to put that paragraph after paragraph 4, in which those pressures 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 are described. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 64 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Math 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1. B To find the solution, divide 40.5 by 1,000 by moving the decimal point 3 places to the left. 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 2. J You can solve the problem algebraically as follows: 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 23 2 x 5 2~15 2 x! 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 23 2 x 5 30 2 2x 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 x57 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 An alternative method is to subtract the number given in each answer choice, in turn, from 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 both Lyle’s age and Melanie’s age. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 3. D 4 3 4 3 4 5 64, and 5 3 5 3 5 5 125. Thus, x must lie between 4 and 5. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 4. G The first coordinate in the (x,y) pair (4,25) is the point’s horizontal position (along the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 x-axis), while the second coordinate in the pair is the point’s vertical position (along the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 y-axis). Point Q matches both coordinates. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 5. B The price of two children’s tickets together equals the price of one adult ticket. The total 7 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 admission price is therefore equivalent to the price of three adult tickets. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 3a 5 $12.60 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 a 5 $4.20 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Child’s ticket price 5 ~$4.20! 5 $2.10 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 6. J Of six marbles altogether, two are blue. Hence, the chances of drawing a blue marble are 2 7 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 in 6, or 1 in 3, which can be expressed as the fraction . 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 3 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7. D Given that point D bisects BA, the length of AD must be equal to the length of DB, as shown 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 in this figure: 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 8. K Cross-multiply to solve for y: 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 ~9!~y 2 1! 5 ~2y!~3! 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 9y 2 9 5 6y 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 3y 5 9 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 y53 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 9. C Your first step is to rename mixed numbers as fractions: 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 9 15 12 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 4 5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 The least common denominator is 20. You can eliminate answer choice D. Rename each 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 fraction, then combine: 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 9 15 12 90 1 75 2 48 117 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 1 2 5 5 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 2 4 5 20 20 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 65 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 27 1 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 10. J 59 ab c 5 ~3!~9! 5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 3 3 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 11. A Rewrite the question as an algebraic equation, and solve for x: 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 P 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 M5 ~x! 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 100 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 100M 5 Px 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 100M 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 5x 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 P 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 12. J The sum of the measures of any triangle’s interior angles is 180°. Accordingly, the third 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 interior angle of the triangle with angles measuring 30° and 75° measures 75°. Since the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 quadrilateral formed by the two pairs of parallel lines is a parallelogram, the vertex opposite 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 that 75° angle also measures 75°. Since ∠x is the supplement of that 75° angle, ∠x measures 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 105°. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 13. C You can express the amount of sugar after you add water as 0.05(60 1 x), where 0.05 5 5% 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 and (60 1 x) represents the total amount of solution after you add the additional water. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 14. J Points (5, 22) and (23, 3) are two points on line b. The slope of b is the change in the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 y-coordinates divided by the corresponding change in the x-coordinate: 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 5 5 3 2 (22) 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 5 , or 2 mb 5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2325 28 8 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 15. A 412 412 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 , Applying the midpoint formula, the coordinates of M are , or (3, 3). The 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 1 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 triangle’s height and base are both 3, and its area 5 bh 5 ~3!~3! 5 4.5. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 16. G Equate the proportions of the negative with those of the printed picture: 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 8 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 4 x 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 5 15 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 8 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 4 x 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 15 5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 x5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 5x 5 15 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 x53 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 SD S D 66 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 17. E Put the equation given in the question into the form y 5 mx 1 b: 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 4x 2 2y 5 6 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2y 5 4x 2 6 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 y 5 2x 2 3 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 17 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 The line’s slope (m) is 2. Accordingly, the slope of a line perpendicular to this line is 2 . 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 27 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 Given a y-intercept of 3, the equation of the perpendicular line is y 5 2 x 1 3. Reworking 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 this equation to match the form of the answer choices yields 2y 1 x 5 6. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 18. J Before 4 socks were removed, the drawer contained 24 blue socks (60 3 40% 5 24) and 36 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 gray socks (24 1 36 5 60.) After removing 4 blue socks, the drawer contained 20 blue socks 7 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 and 36 gray socks. The ratio of gray to blue socks is 36:20, or 9:5. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 19. D To determine the distance between the two points, apply the distance formula: 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 d 5 =~x1 2 x2!2 1 ~y1 2 y2!2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 5 =~5 2 1!2 1 ~4 2 @22#!2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 5 =42 1 62 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 5 =52, or 2=13 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 20. G Set each of the four expressions, in turn, equal to 0, then solve for x in each equation. Given 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 2x 5 0, x 5 0. Given 3x 2 1 5 0, x 5 . Given 2x 2 2 5 0, x 5 1. Given x 2 3 5 0, x 5 3. 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 3 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 The solution set, then, contains 0, , 1, and 3. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 3 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 21. A The graph shows all x-values less than 21.5 and all x-values greater than 1.5. Choice A 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 describes all x-values. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 22. H Combine the terms under the radical into one fraction: 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 2 2 2 1 y 9y 2 y y 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 18 18 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 8y2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 18 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 4y2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 9 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Then factor out “perfect squares” from both numerator and denominator: 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 4y 2y 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 5 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 9 3 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Î Î Î Î Î Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 67 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 23. A Add the two equations: 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 x1y5a 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 x2y5b 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2x 1 0 5 a 1 b 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 x 5 ~a 1 b! 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 24. K Given that the equation has only one solution, the two binomial factors of the trinomial 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 x2 1 8x 1 s 5 0 must be the same: ~x 1 =s!. Rewrite in unfactored form: 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 ~x 1 =s!~x 1 =s! 5 0 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 x 1 ~2=s!x 1 s 5 0 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2=s 5 8. Therefore, =s5 4, and s 5 16. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 25. C Apply the formula for the equation of a circle: (x 2 h)2 1 (y 2 k)2 5 r2. Given that the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 circle’s center (h,k) is (3,21), its radius (r) is 5, and the y-coordinate of one point on the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 circle is 2, you can solve for x (m) as follows: 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 2 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 ~m 2 3! 1 ~2 2 @21#! 5 5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 ~m 2 3! 1 9 5 25 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 ~m 2 3!2 5 16 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 m 2 3 5 64 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 m 5 7, 21 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 One of these two values, 21, appears among the answer choices. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 26. K The triangle’s three sides are in the ratio 8:15:17, which is one of the Pythagorean side 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 triplets (82 1 152 5 172). Thus, the triangle must be a right triangle in which the two 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 shortest sides form the right (90°) angle. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 27. C To determine the answer quantity, work systematically, beginning with the greatest 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 possible integer: 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 7 1 1 1 1 1 1 5 10 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 5 1 3 1 1 1 1 5 10 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 3 1 3 1 3 1 1 5 10 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 As you can see, there are three different ways. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 68 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 2 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 28. K Letting x 5 the unknown length, by the Pythagorean theorem: 13 1 x 5 39 . Solving 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 for x: 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 2 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 x 5 39 2 13 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 x 5 =39 2 13 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 2 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 5 =~13! ~3! 2 13 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 5 =132~32 2 1! 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 5 13=8 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 5 26=2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 29. D Given that the average of the first five numbers is A, their sum must be 5A. Thus, the sum of 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 all six numbers is 5A 1 n. To find the average of all six numbers, divide their sum by the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 5A 1 n 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 . number of terms (6): 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 6 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 30. F The sum of the lengths of any two sides of a triangle must be greater than the length of the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 third side. Thus, in the triangle at hand, the length of the third side must be less than 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 15 inches. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 31. B You’re looking for the point at which the dotted line (ABC’s stock price) is furthest above 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 the solid line (XYZ’s stock price). The dotted line lies above the solid line only during the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 second half of the 2nd quarter and the first half of the 3rd quarter; the end of the 2nd quarter 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 marks the greatest difference between prices during that period. At that time, ABC stock was 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 priced at approximately $7.60, while XYZ stock was priced at approximately $5 per share. 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 The difference between those two prices is $2.60. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 32. F Solve this problem using the rules for signs and with a bit of logical reasoning. Using 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 negative integers approaching zero (0) will yield the least product. Start with 21, then 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 decrease the values of x and y if necessary. The first two values that satisfy the equation are: 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 y 5 22, x 5 21 [21 2 (22) 5 1]. Accordingly, xy 5 2. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 33. E y 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Square both sides of the equation, then solve for x: 4x 5 y; x 5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 4 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 34. G The question provides the formula: distance 5 rate 3 time. The boat’s total distance 5 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 m 1 20, while its total traveling time 5 t 1 4. Accordingly: 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 m 1 20 5 ~r!~t 1 4! 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 m 1 20 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 5r 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 t14 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 35. B Quadrilateral ABCD is a parallelogram. In any parallelogram, opposite vertices have the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 same angle measures. Thus, m∠DAB 5 60°. The sum of the measures of the 3 interior 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 angles of DABD 5 180°. Thus, m∠ABD 5 45°. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 69 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 36. K If you multiply the second equation by 4, and then isolate the m-term, this reveals that the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 two equations are the same: 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 3 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 4 n 5 4~3 2 m! 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 4 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 3n 5 12 2 4m 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 4m 5 12 2 3n 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 Given one linear equation in two variables, there are an infinite number of possible values for 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 each variable. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 37. C First, multiply matrix A by the scalar 2. To do so, multiply each term in matrix A by 2: 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 23 5 26 10 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 5 2A 5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 37 6 14 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 Then, subtract matrix B from matrix 2A. To do so, subtract each term in matrix B by the 7 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 corresponding term in matrix 2A: 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 26 10 32 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 2A 2 B 5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 6 14 21 1 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 29 8 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 7 13 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 38. G Each successive term is 3 less than the preceding term. Here’s the sequence of ten terms: {30, 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 27, 24, 21, 18, 15, 12, 9, 6, 3}. Including the first term (30), the tenth term in the sequence 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 is 3. 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 39. C 2g(M) 5 2log6M 5 log6M2. Hence, f (2(g(M)) 5 M2. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 40. K DQRS is a right triangle in which the length of the sides are in the ratio 3:4:5. The length of 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 RS (the hypotenuse) is 5 units. Given that ST is also 5 units long, DRST is an isosceles right 7 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 triangle, in which the length of the sides are in the ratio 1:1:=2. The length of RT (the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 hypotenuse) must be 5=2 units. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 41. D Competitor 1 must engage in 5 matches. Competitor 2 must engage in 4 matches not already 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 accounted for. (The match between competitors 1 and 2 has already been tabulated.) 7 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Similarly, competitor 3 must engage in 3 matches other than those accounted for, and so on. 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 The minimum number of total matches 5 5 1 4 1 3 1 2 1 1 5 15. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 42. G The length of each side of the square is 12 feet. The length of the remaining two sides of the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 1 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 triangle totals 16 feet. The perimeter of the semicircle 5 pd 5 p~12! 5 6p. The length of 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 the two sides of the square included in the overall perimeter totals 24. The total perimeter of 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the floor 5 16 1 6p 1 24 5 40 1 6p. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 43. D For any right triangle, by definition, the tangent of one acute angle is the reciprocal of the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 tangent of the other acute angle. Thus, their product is 1. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 SD F GF G F GF G FG 70 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 44. J In 3 hours, one ship traveled 72 miles, while the other traveled 30 miles. The ratio of these 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 two distances is 30:72 or 5:12, suggesting a 5:12:13 triangle in which the hypotenuse is the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 distance between the two ships at 2:30 p.m. That distance is 78 miles. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 45. C AC is a diagonal of the square ABCD. To find the length of any square’s diagonal, multiply 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 the length of any side by =2. So first you need to find the length of a side here. Half the 7 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 length of a side equals the circle’s radius, and the perimeter of any circle equals 2pr, where 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 r is the radius. Thus, the radius here is 8, and the length of each of the square’s sides is 16. 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Therefore, diagonal AC 5 16=2. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 46. K The square root of (3)(12), or 36, 5 6. However, since =3x 5 6i rather than 6, x 5 212. 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 47. C Factor the numerator and the denominator. (The numerator provides a difference of two 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 squares.) Simplify, then distribute the resulting denominator to both terms in the numerator: 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 x 24 ~x 1 2!~x 2 2! 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 x2 2 2x x~x 2 2! 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 x12 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 x 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 x2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 51 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 xx 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 511 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 x 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 48. K Your task is to determine the least common multiple of all three numbers. The least number 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 of days until events A, B, and C all occur again on the same day is the product of the three 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 numbers (3, 5, and 8), which is 120. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 49. D The figure shows a hexagon. The sum of the measures of the six angles 5 720°. Subtracting 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 the three known angles from 720 leaves 420°, which is the sum of the measures of the three 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 unknown angles. Set up an equation, then solve for x: 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 4 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 x 1 x 1 x 5 420 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 14 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 x 5 420 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 x 5 ~420! 5 ~30!~5! 5 150 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 14 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 71 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 50. G First, express the equation in the quadratic form: (x 1 4x 1 2 5 0) [a 5 1, b 5 4, c 5 2]. 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Then, apply the quadratic formula: 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 24 6 =4 2 4~1!~2! 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 x5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2~1! 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 24 6 =8 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 24 6 2=2 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 24 2=2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 6 5 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 5 22 6 =2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 3 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 51. E First, determine the length of each edge of the cube: =125 5 5. The surface area of each 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 square face of the cube 5 5 3 5 5 25. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 52. K After 4 hours, the clock will run behind the actual time by 16 minutes. Accordingly, at 4:00 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 the clock will show 3:44. It will take 16 minutes plus about one additional minute (because 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the clock runs 1 minute slow every quarter-hour) for the clock to advance to 4:00. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 53. D The graph shows a vertically oriented parabola. Thus, the general form for parabola’s 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 equation is y 2 k 5 a(x 2 h)2. Since the vertex is at (3,0), h 5 3 and k 5 0, and the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 parabola’s equation is y 5 a(x 2 3)2. Each answer choice expresses an equation in 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 unfactored form. Accordingly, rewrite the equation y 5 a(x 2 3)2 in the same manner (to 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 identify the best equation among the five choices, you don’t need to know the value of a, 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 which defines the parabola’s “width”): 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 y 5 ~x 2 3!~x 2 3! 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 y 5 x 2 6x 1 9 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 54. J Letting x 5 the length of one side of the painting, the painting’s area 5 x , and the entire 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 area, including the picture and mat, is (x 1 2)2. The difference is the area of the mat. Thus: 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 ~x 1 2! 2 x 5 60 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 x2 1 4x 1 4 2 x2 5 60 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 4x 5 56 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 x 5 14 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 55. A The area of any triangle 5 ba, where b is its base and a is its altitude. In the triangle in 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 question, b 5 a. Substitute this value for b in the area formula: 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 b 1 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 A5 ~b!~b! 5 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 SD 72 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 56. F The denominator |y 2 2|, and hence the value of x, is always positive, even for negative 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 y-values. The graph of the equation is asymptotic at y 5 2, just like the original equation. 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Choice A provides the appropriate graph. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 QR 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 57. B In DPQR, tanx 5 . Given tanx . 1, PQ , QR and, accordingly, y , x. Since the sum of 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 PQ 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 x and y must be 90, x . 45 and y , 45—which choice B contradicts. Each of the other four 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 choices must be true. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 58. K x7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 As you can see from the figure below, letting x 5 half the length of the base, sin16° 5 ; 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 37 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 x 5 3sin16°; and the length of the entire base 5 6sin16°. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 16˚ 16˚ 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 3 3 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 x 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 59. C In choice C, unequal quantities are subtracted from equal quantities. The differences are 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 unequal, but the inequality is reversed because unequal numbers are being subtracted from 7 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 rather than added to the equal numbers. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 60. H The standard form for the equation of a cosine curve is y 5 Acoskx, where A is the curve’s 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 amplitude. The value of A in the given equation is 2. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Reading 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1. D In lines 12–17, Bertha describes her feeling of bliss as swallowing the afternoon sun and it 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 sending a shower of sparks through her whole body—a description that is clear evidence of 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 an imaginative mind. [Eliminate choice A.] Later in the passage, Bertha demonstrates 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 affection toward her baby. We are informed in line 55 that Bertha wanted to question the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 Nanny’s judgment, but “she did not dare to.” This line indicates her timid nature. 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 However, nowhere in the passage does either the narrator or Bertha herself suggest that 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Bertha is arrogant. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 2. H Upon seeing Bertha arrive at the nursery, Nanny “set her lips in a way that Bertha knew, and 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 that meant she had come into the nursery at another wrong moment.” It is reasonable to 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 infer that Nanny dislikes Bertha’s visits to the nursery during certain times. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 3. C In the paragraph preceding the use of the metaphor, we are told that “although Bertha 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 Young was thirty,” she had youthful emotions that she cannot express by such means as 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 “dancing steps on and off the pavement.” From this, we can infer that people of a certain 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 age are expected to follow a certain code of behavior by not doing what they feel like doing. 7 1 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 73 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 4. F Nanny tells Bertha (in lines 76–78) that Bertha unthinkingly excites the baby, conveniently 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 leaving Nanny to deal with the consequences. From this statement, we can surmise 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 that Nanny considers Bertha a thoughtless person. By Nanny’s repeated admonitions to 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Bertha about the baby’s care, we can infer that she would agree that Bertha is inexperienced 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 as a mother. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 5. C We know from the details in the passage that Nanny feeds, bathes and grooms the baby, and 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 also takes her out to the park. So, she no doubt considers herself the baby’s primary 7 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 caregiver. Even when Bertha occasionally visits with the baby, Nanny tries to treat Bertha as 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 merely a “visitor“—by criticizing Bertha’s behavior vis-a-vis the baby. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 6. J The use of the word “absurd” is explained in the sentence that follows, where Bertha 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 (through the narrator) questions the point of having a baby if “it has to be kept . . . in 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 another woman’s arms.” 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7. B Bertha stands watching Nanny with Bertha’s baby. Bertha wishes she could be in Nanny’s 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 place, taking care of her baby herself. In this way, Bertha is like a poor little girl who wishes 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 she had the doll that she sees the rich girl with, but she cannot afford it. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 8. J The passage provides ample evidence of Nanny’s possessive nature—for example, the use of 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 “my” lovey (line 40) and the last sentence of the passage, in which we are told that Nanny 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 came back into the nursery and seized “her Little B.” 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 9. B In the second paragraph, we are informed that Bertha’s “bliss” is a feeling brought about 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 “suddenly”; we are not told of any specific event as the cause of it. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 10. F We can infer from details provided by much of the passage that Nanny and Bertha 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 continually compete for Little B and how her time is spent in the nursery. By the use of the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 word “triumph,” we can infer that this round was in Nanny’s favor—since Bertha had to 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 not only relinquish the baby but leave the nursery as well. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 11. B In the seventh paragraph, the passage states clearly that the company started its operations 7 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 with capital obligations of “no less than $26 million.” 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 12. H The word subscriptions is used in the context of raising money for a project involving the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 completion of the railway line. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 13. D The author presents a chronological (time sequential) account of the history of the Erie 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 Railroad—beginning with the first survey of the proposed construction line and ending with 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 the final stage of construction. The author cites what appear to be carefully researched facts 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 regarding the project’s financing, the condition of the completed railroad, and the expansion 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 of the railroad. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 14. F In the last paragraph, the author suggests that, in its final expansion, the company’s railroad 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 connected Lake Erie with New York City. It is reasonably inferable that this “final 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 expansion” connects the two most remote points. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 15. D From the second paragraph, we know that, contrary to choice D it was the desire to be 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 connected to Lake Erie by the southern counties that provided the initial impetus to the plan. 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 Hence, it would make no sense to cite insufficient interest in this connection as an argument 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 against the proposed Erie Railroad project. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 74 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 16. H As stated in the sixth paragraph, “after eighteen years of effort, the line was opened to 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Lake Erie.” 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 17. B The word insolvent refers to the company’s monetary (money) problems as explained in the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 following sentence, which mentions the delay in further progress until sufficient new capital 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 was raised. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 18. G In the fourth paragraph, the passage informs us that the Panic of 1837 and the depression 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 that followed did interfere with the construction, but that a year later “the state legislature 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 provided a construction loan.” We can surmise that the money loaned was used to continue 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the construction of the railroad. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 19. A In lines 104–105, the author states that the railroad “soon became notorious for its many 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 accidents. . . .” The word notorious means having an unfavorable reputation. Thus, we can 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 infer that the company’s ill repute was due to the frequent accidents involving its railroad. 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 20. J The first sentence of the passage tells us that the original plan was for the railroad to connect 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 the Hudson River to Lake Erie. In the sixth paragraph, the passage indicates that the west 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 terminus of the constructed railroad was on Lake Erie while the east terminus was on the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 Hudson. It is reasonable to infer, then, that the railroad was indeed completed according to 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 the original plan. In the sixth paragraph, the passage indicates that various feeders 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 (branches) were added to the railroad. Then, in the final paragraph, the author tells us of 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 further expansion, via acquisition of other railroads. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 21. C The sentence in which the word munificent appears tells us that Dr. Doyle’s income was 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 quite respectable “if not munificent.” The strong implication here is that Doyle’s income 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 was ample to lead a comfortable life. The word bountiful is consistent with this idea. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 22. H The final paragraph tells us that it was only after the publication of a series of Holmes 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 tales in a new magazine called The Strand that the “public finally took an interest in 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Dr. Doyle’s detective.” 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 23. B The passage provides ample information that runs contrary to the description in choice 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 B—especially lines 88–91 in which Doyle comes across as a reluctant chronicler of 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 Sherlock’s fictional adventures. Also of special note are lines 117–118, in which we are 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 informed of Doyle’s “lack of enthusiasm for his protagonist” and how Doyle considered the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 Holmes stories insignificant compared to Doyle’s other novels. It was the public’s passion 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 for Holmes stories, not Doyle’s, that was the main reason Doyle wrote more Sherlock 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Holmes adventures. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 24. F The third paragraph clearly states that Dr. Doyle believed “he could create a different kind 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 of detective, one for whom detection was a science rather than art.” And, nowhere in the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 passage does the author state or imply that Doyle was unsuccessful in doing so. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 25. C The third paragraph tells us that the creator of Sherlock Holmes (Doyle) used one of his 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 medical school professors, Dr. Joseph Bell, as a model for creating a detective “who applied 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 similar intellectual powers to the solving of criminal mysteries.” 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 26. G In lines 18–20 we learn that Doyle started writing because he felt that it “would keep him 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 busy” and “hopefully bring additional funds.” 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 75 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 27. D The author considers it fortunate that Doyle had time to concentrate on his writing. The 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 implication here is that, in the author’s view, Doyle’s literary career was of more significance 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 than his medical one. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 28. F In the sixth paragraph, we’re told that Doyle’s move to London was enabled by “other small 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 literary successes.” One reasonable inference is that his successes allowed him to finally 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 afford to live in London. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 29. B In the final paragraph, we’re told that Doyle was able to give up his practice and turn to 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 writing full time mainly because of the public clamor for more Sherlock Holmes stories. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 30. J The first paragraph tells us that Doyle moved to Portsmouth to begin a medical practice in 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1882, and that since there were several well established physicians there, Doyle found 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 himself with a great deal of spare time. Then, in the first sentence of the next paragraph, we 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 learn that, to fill this time, “he began writing” stories—presumably, shortly after his arrival 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 in Portsmouth in 1882. The final paragraph tells us that it wasn’t until 1891, when The 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 Strand begin publishing his Sherlock Holmes tales, that “the public finally took interest in 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Doyle’s detective.” 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 31. C The passage cites instances involving local residents and activists in particular geographic 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 locations. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 32. G The first paragraph informs us that Pace’s “rudimentary research efforts were guided by 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 hope” rather “than by scientific method.” A research effort guided more by hope than by 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 scientific method would be more basic than the other one. In this context, it makes sense 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 that rudimentary might mean “basic.” Besides, none of the other answer choices make sense 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 in this context. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 33. C The passage makes no mention of the spouses of abestos workers. All other choices 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 indicated factors explicitly mentioned in the passage (lines 36–42) as factors leading to the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 conclusion that asbestos exposure causes cancer. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 34. J The second paragraph defines “background rate” as “the number of people affected in the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 general population.” The fourth paragraph indicates that the type of cancer afflicting the six 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 young women “had been reported only once or twice before.” This low incidence meets the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 definition of a “low background rate.” The second paragraph defines “specificity” as “any 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 notable characteristics of the individual affected in each case.” The fact that the six young 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 women suffered from “a certain vaginal cancer” suggests that what these women shared was 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 a very specific, and unusual, symptom. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 35. D The first sentence of the second paragraph refers to “cancer cases and other non-contagious 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 conditions such as birth defects . . . .” This statement infers that cancer and birth defects fall 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 into the same category—noncontagious conditions—meaning that neither type of condition 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 can be transmitted by contact. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 36. F To convey the meaning of the phrase “epidemiological gerrymandering,” the author cites 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 the case of citizens drawing boundaries around certain cancer cases and labeling it a cluster, 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 thereby giving undue advantage to their cause. The activity that choice F describes is most 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 analogous to this activity. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 76 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 37. A According to the information in the fourth paragraph, the citizens might include cases of 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 cancer that were either diagnosed before they moved into the locality in consideration or 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 might have been exposed to a carcinogen in their previous domicile. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 38. G The passage informs us, in lines 34–35, that “lung cancer is very common in the general 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 population“—from which we can reasonably infer that the background rate for lung cancer 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 is very high. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 39. C The first paragraph of the passage, along with the passages final sentence, conveys this 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 objective. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 40. G In the last paragraph, the author cites the example of the Long Island cancer cluster, brought 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 to light by a basic study conducted by a citizen. This study, combined with reports of other 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 clusters in the community, helped “lay the groundwork” for the scientists to set up a 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 well-designed study to determine the reason for the cancer cluster. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Science Reasoning 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1. D In the station adjacent to lake 5, the sulfate-concentration levels varied only from 0.65 to 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 0.68 Mg/L—a variation of 0.03 Mg/L, the smallest among the five stations. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 2. J The top cluster chart in Figure 2 shows pH levels in one of the two non-glacial lakes 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 (denoted by hollow circles) slightly higher in 2000 than in 1993 (the x-value is slightly 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 greater than the y-value), while for the other non-glacial lake there appears to have been 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 little or no change (the level is just over 7 in both years). In contrast, the chart shows pH 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 levels in all three glacial lakes (denoted by solid circles) to be significantly higher in 2000 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 than in 1993. (For each one, the x-value is significantly greater than the y-value.) 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 3. A Table 1 shows that, over the study period (1993–2000), sulfate-concentration levels 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 increased slightly in lake 5 and decreased slightly in lakes 1–4; also, over the time period, 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 decreases as well as increases were seen in all lakes. Hence, the data shows no clear trend in 7 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 either direction. However, sulfate concentration in all lakes but one of the non-glacial lakes 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 (in which the level was the same, about 300, in 1993 as well as in 2000) increased 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 significantly over the study period. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 4. H The rainfall-temperature chart (Figure 1) shows that, over the most recent century, air 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 temperature has been rising steadily—perhaps to a critical point, around 1993, when the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 glaciers at the two glacial lakes began melting into the lakes, which are frozen over during 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 fewer and fewer days each year. One possible consequence is that more industrial sulfate 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 emissions are finding their way into lake water—by means of precipitation or glacial 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 runoff, or both. The results of Experiment 2, which show the that the most dramatic 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 increase in sulfate-concentration levels have occurred in the two glacial lakes, further 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 support this hypothesis. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 5. B Experiment 2 showed that, while sulfate-concentration levels in the two glacial lakes 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 increased from 1993 to 2000, pH levels did not. On the other hand, in the non-glacial lakes, 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 where the water is presumably warmer, levels of both sulfate-concentration and pH 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 increased over the same time period. Choice B provides a possible explanation for this 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 distinction between glacial and non-glacial lakes. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 77 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 6. B The higher the rotational period, the more slowly a planet rotates. Table 1 shows that, in 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 general, there is a direct relationship between surface temperature and rotational period. 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Mercury and Venus have by far the greatest surface temperatures and rotational 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 periods. Surface temperatures and rotational periods for Earth and Mars are similar to each 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 other but significantly less than the ones for Mercury and Venus. The next four planets 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 show similar levels for each, but less than the levels for Earth and Mars. (Pluto presents the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 only significant exception to the general relationship between surface temperature and 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 rotational period.) 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7. C Earth’s average density is 5.5 times that of water, the highest among the nine planets shown. 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 Earth’s rotational period, 24 hours, is fifth longest. (Mercury, Venus, Mars, and Pluto all 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 have longer rotational periods, while the remaining four planets all have shorter periods.) 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 8. H In Table 1, average densities are relative to the density of water. Pluto’s average density is 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 given as 1.0—which by definition is the density of water. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 9. A Mercury’s rotational period is 59 Earth days. Thus, in 88 Earth days, Mercury rotates about 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1.3 times. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 10. F The figure showing density and diameter of the four terrestrial planets reveals a direct linear 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 relationship between density and diameter for Mars, Earth, and Venus (for each planet, the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 density-diameter ratio is about the same), but not for Mercury (for which the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 density-diameter ratio is much higher). 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 11. D Notice that Mercury’s orbital eccentricity is far greater than that of Venus (whose orbit is 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 nearly circular). Accordingly, Mercury’s surface temperatures will vary greatly as it orbits 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 the Sun— increasing when its distance from the Sun grows smaller, then decreasing as its 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 distance increases. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 12. G In Table 1, a positive percent change indicates a net gain, while a negative percent change 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 indicates a net loss. For all but two nutrients—ammonium and nitrate—the percent change 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 is negative. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 13. D Table 2 shows that, in each year (1–3) losses of both organic and inorganic matter were 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 generally higher in deforested areas than in undisturbed areas. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 14. F Table 2 shows that for two of the three sources of output (basin and filter), the loss of 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 particulate matter in the undisturbed area increased significantly from Year 1 to Year 2, then 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 decreased significantly from Year 2 to Year 3. In an undisturbed area, the most plausible 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 reason for a substantial increase in runoff is an increase in precipitation. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 15. C In both experiments, fine material was caught by using a net. Hence, from the information 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 given in the question we can conclude that sodium is primarily a net-caught material. Table 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 2 shows that losses of net-caught materials changed very little during the three-year period. 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 Nothing in the passage or in the tables suggests that changes in sodium losses were any 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 greater or less than the overall changes shown in the table. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 16. J Table 2 shows no clear trend in the undisturbed area; thus it is reasonable to forecast no 7 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 marked change over the longer term. Although the table shows increasing losses in nutrient 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 matter in the deforested area over the three-year period of the study, no evidence is given 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 suggesting that this trend will continue indefinitely. To the contrary, the fact that the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 78 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 ecologists applied herbicide to the deforested area to prevent organic matter from growing 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 there strongly suggests that, over time, organic matter will reappear in the area, thereby 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 slowly reducing the net losses of nutrients in that area. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 17. B If the six experimental areas receive less rainfall per hectare than the forest as a whole, then 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 the amount of nutrients entering each hectare would, on average, be greater than the table 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 suggests. If this is the case, then unless the average runoff from other areas of the forest is 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 also greater, net losses of nutrients would be less (and net gains would be greater) than the 7 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 table suggests. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 18. H Since the anti-cancer theory is based on the idea that gene imprinting evolved as a reaction to 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 the possibility that the placenta might develop in a cancerous fashion, the theory would be 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 severely undermined if it were true that plants, which have no placentas, had also developed 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 the imprinting mechanism. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 19. A The first sentence of the paragraph defining the protein control theory states this point 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 succinctly. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 20. J The competing parental interest theory assumes that both males and females seek to 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 maximize the chances that their genes will be passed along to the next generation through a 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 large number of healthy offspring. (It then postulates that, because males and females have 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 different reproductive patterns, they have evolved different strategies for pursuing this 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 result.) This assumption is stated in choice J. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 21. A All three theories relate to reproduction in one way or another: the parental interest theory 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 in regard to the transmission of genetic material through reproduction; the anti-cancer 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 theory in relation to the development of the placenta, in which the fetus grows; and the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 protein control theory in relation to the healthy development of the embryo. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 22. H Notice that the competing parental interest theory makes sense only if non-monogamous 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 species are involved (since it is the differing reproductive habits of males and females that 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 drives them to handle their genetic material differently). The finding described in choice H 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 fits that theory because it suggests that imprinting is an unnecessary strategy in a 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 monogamous species. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 23. D This disorder supports the competing parental interest theory because the father’s genetic 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 material in that theory is associated with excessive growth, as here; it supports the 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 anti-cancer theory because that theory associates imprinting with the need to control 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 excessive growth of the placenta, as here; and it supports the protein control theory because, 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 if the mother’s genes are absent when the disorder occurs, this could explain the abnormal 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 development found. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 24. G This result would be consistent with the theory, since the female genes from Species A would 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 not be imprinted for small size, while the male genes from Species B would be imprinted for 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 large size. The combination would produce very large offspring. 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 25. B In all three experiments, the input amplitude was fixed at 2.0 volts. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 26. F Only Experiment 2 shows the effect of a 1mH inductance using filter type 3. In the graph of 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 Experiment 2, an input frequency of 100KHz (measured by the horizontal axis) corresponds 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 roughly to a 1.9 volt output amplitude (measured by the vertical axis). 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 79 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 27. C The graphical representations of the three filters show that filter type 3 is the only one that 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 contains an inductor. Experiment 2 was designed with inductance as the variable. It would 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 make sense to conduct such as experiment only with a filter containing an inductor. Also, 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Experiment 3 was designed explicitly with inductance as a control; again, the description 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 and methodology of the experiment makes sense only when a filter that contains an inductor 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 is used. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 28. G Based on the graph of Experiment 2, the higher the inductance level, the earlier a frequency 7 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 response curve peaks. This means that at lower frequencies, sine waves are more likely to 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 pass through the filter, contributing to a higher output amplitude. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 29. D Only in Experiment 3 is capacitance a variable. The graphical results of that experiment 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 show that, as the value of the capacitance increases, the frequency response curve narrows. 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 30. F Experiment 2 shows that a high inductance level results in the broadest peak, which is 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 through the lower portion of the frequency spectrum. Conversely, Experiment 3 shows that 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 a low capacitance level results in the broadest peak, which is through the higher portion of 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 the frequency spectrum. Thus, it makes sense to combine both features in order to attain a 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 high level of reception throughout the entire frequency spectrum. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 31. C The question refers to generation 1 in Figure 1. The male and the female (the parents of 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 generation 2) each have one copy of the disease gene (denoted by an uppercase “D”). 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 32. F The only person in the figure who might contract the disease is the female in generation 3 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 identified as “DD.” Both of her parents were healthy carriers—that is, they both had one 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 copy of the disease gene. Thus, choice F cannot be true. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 33. D Figure 2 does not provide any information about the father of her child. If the father has no 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 copy of the disease gene, then the probability of their passing the disease onto their child 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 would be zero (0%). Otherwise (if he has either one or two copies of the disease gene), that 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 probability would be greater than zero. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 34. G Figure 2 shows a total of nine children and grandchildren of the two individuals in 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 generation 1. (Do not count the individuals in generation 2 who are parents but are not 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 descended from generation 1.) Of these nine descendants, a total of four (one child and three 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 grandchildren) have a copy of the disease gene (marked by an uppercase “D”). 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 35. D In the case of a disease with a dominant inheritance pattern, if a person has at least one 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 disease gene, that person will definitely have the disease. Since neither of Pamela’s parents 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 had disease X, the disease must have a recessive (and not a dominant) inheritance pattern. 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 36. H In every season except summer, salinity is lower at 5 meters than at 20 meters, and even 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 lower at the surface. In summer, salinity is the same at all levels, which at least does not run 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 contrary to the pattern in all other seasons. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 37. D Seasonal increases and decreases in the number of salmon caught do not correspond to 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 seasonal increases and decreases in water temperature at the surface and at 5 meters below 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 the surface. As summer turns to fall, salinity levels decrease dramatically while the number 7 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 of salmon caught, which is one indication of the level of the salmon population in the bay, 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 increases dramatically. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 80 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234567 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 38. G Choice G tells us that the local human population does not depend at all on salmon as a 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 source of protein. But, complaints of protein deficiency-related diseases vary dramatically 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 from season to season. Thus, it makes no sense that salmon availability has anything to do 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 with protein deficiency-related illnesses. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 39. A Seasonal changes in salinity at the ocean floor vary directly with the sample count of 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 gammarus locusta. What’s more, percent changes in the sample count of gammarus locusta 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 in response to salinity changes are far greater than percent changes in the sample count 7 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Gammarus duebent in response to salinity changes. From winter to spring, for example, 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 compare the 98% decrease in the locusta count (from 340 to 5) to the mere 50% decrease in 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 the duebent count (from 50 to 25). Thus, it appears that locusta are more sensitive to salinity 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 changes than duebent. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 40. G The fact that these illnesses occur mainly in the winter and spring, considered together with 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 the comparatively high number of salmon caught and bears observed during the fall, suggest 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 that the local villagers consume salmon and bear meat (if they hunt bears for food) shortly 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 after killing it. By preserving the fish and meat for consumption during the winter and 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 spring, the villagers might very well avoid these types of illnesses. 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1 234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 7 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 81 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 The results from your practice tests will give you a general idea of what you might score if you had to 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 take the ACT today. To convert the number of right answers on your self-evaluation test into an ACT 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 scaled score, do the following: 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 Refer to the table below. For each subject area, count the number of right answers and find 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 that number in the left-hand column marked “Raw Score.” Move to the right until you have 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 the column for the appropriate subject. That is your ACT scaled score for the subject area. For 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 example, if you had 39 right answers on your Math test, you would find the number 39 in the 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 left-hand column, then move right to the Math column and see that you have an ACT scaled 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 score of 23. 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 After you have found your scaled score for each subject, add all four scaled numbers together 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 and divide by four. Round fractions to the nearest whole number; round upward. This number 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 is your ACT composite score. 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 Score Conversion Table 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 Raw English Math Reading Science 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 Score Scaled Score Scaled Score Scaled Score Scaled Score 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 75 36 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 74 35 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 73 34 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 72 33 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 71 32 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 70 31 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 69 30 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 68 30 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 67 29 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 66 29 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 65 28 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 64 28 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 63 27 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 62 27 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 61 26 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 60 26 36 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 59 25 35 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 123456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 Your Practice Test Scores Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 83 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 Score Conversion Table 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 Raw English Math Reading Science 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 Score Scaled Score Scaled Score Scaled Score Scaled Score 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 58 25 34 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 57 24 34 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 56 24 33 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 55 23 32 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 54 23 31 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 53 23 30 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 52 22 30 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 51 22 29 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 50 22 29 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 49 21 28 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 48 21 28 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 47 21 27 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 46 20 27 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 45 20 26 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 44 20 26 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 43 19 25 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 42 19 25 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 41 19 24 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 40 18 24 36 36 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 39 18 23 35 34 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 38 18 23 33 32 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 37 17 23 32 30 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 36 17 22 31 29 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 35 17 22 30 28 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 34 16 21 29 27 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 33 16 21 28 27 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 32 15 20 27 26 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 31 15 20 27 25 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 30 14 19 26 24 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 29 14 19 25 24 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 123456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 84 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 1234567890123456789012345678901212345678901234567890123456789012123456 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 Score Conversion Table 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 Raw English Math Reading Science 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 Score Scaled Score Scaled Score Scaled Score Scaled Score 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 28 14 19 25 23 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 27 13 18 24 23 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 26 13 18 23 22 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 25 13 18 23 22 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 24 12 17 22 21 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 23 12 17 21 21 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 22 12 17 20 20 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 21 11 16 19 20 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 20 11 16 18 19 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 19 11 16 18 19 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 18 10 15 17 18 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 17 10 15 16 18 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 16 10 15 15 17 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 15 9 14 15 17 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 14 9 14 14 16 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6 9 7 12 11 13 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 8 6 12 10 12 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 7 6 11 8 11 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 6 5 11 7 10 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 5 4 10 6 9 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 4 3 8 5 8 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 3 2 6 4 7 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 2 2 5 3 5 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 1 3 2 3 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 0 1 1 1 1 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 1 23456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 123456789012345678901234567890121234567890123456789012345678901212345 6 Copyright © 2007 Peterson’s, a Nelnet company ACTT is a registered trademark of ACT, Inc., which was not involved in the production of and does not endorse this product. 85 ...
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This note was uploaded on 05/05/2011 for the course MGT 501 taught by Professor Sda during the Spring '11 term at Bina Nusantara University.

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