Statement Logic

Statement Logic - I. Well-formed formulae a. Calculating...

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I. Well-formed formulae a. Calculating truth values of compound statements i. Atomic Statements—single statements, ex “Abe Lincoln was a president” ii. Compound statements—statements with 2 or more parts, ex “Abe Lincoln was a president, and Obama is a lawyer” 1. Negation turns atomic statements into compound statements, ex “It is not the case that Obama is a lawyer” or simply even “Obama is not a lawyer” 2. “And” often acts as an operator, joining 2 statements into 1 compound statement, however not always, ex “Peanut Butter and jelly taste good together” in which case and would not be an operator b. Operators i. Must have 2 objects within a corresponding set of parentheses, however numerous objects bound by a single set of parentheses may count as 1 object 1. Ex: (((P->Q)v(A·B))<->Z) is a WFF ii. Lower case letters (p, q) are ways of describing WFF’s, but do not actually stand in for statements as capital letters do iii. ~p means “not p”, thus reverses the truth value of a statement
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This note was uploaded on 05/07/2011 for the course PHIL 201 taught by Professor Peterhodges during the Fall '08 term at Boise State.

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Statement Logic - I. Well-formed formulae a. Calculating...

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