ORSER-NYC - HistoricalArchaeology...

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Historical Archaeology There are several debates on the  definition of “Historical  Archaeology”
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These are divided into two  camps One camp makes a  distinction of  “historical  archaeology” being  associated with the  development of  writing – this would  push us to the earliest  periods of state  formation. How would you view  this perception of  “historical” and how  would you associate  this period with the  development of  inequality among  peoples?
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The other camp is more recent The more popular  conception is that  “historical  archaeology” is  closely associated  with the age of  exploration. How would you view  this perception of  “historical” and how  would you associate  this period with the  development of  inequality among  peoples?
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Distinctions in developments of  social inequality, the development  of slavery, and archaeological  perspectives. In the earliest periods the development of  the domestication of plants and animals  leads to surplus. Nutritional surplus aids in developing  social stratification – Why is this  important?  How can this pattern of cause  and effect – influence pressures and  developments among a population. 
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Surplus leads to inequalities –  some generalized points: It is not enough to discuss haves and have  nots. Increased food resources provide increased  free time, the development of crafts is evident  presenting changes in the material culture  contained in the archaeological record. What sort of changes would we anticipate in  the archaeological record? What is different when one has the ability to  consult a “written” record?
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Professor Charles E. Orser, Jr.  Illinois State University Considers the  relationship between  Public History and   Archaeology. History and  Anthropology Written data versus  Verbal data -  
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What is Public History? It is history as viewed by the public which is  outside the realm of academia.  One which  includes those occupations such as journalist,  museum curators, preservation specialists, and  many others.    Prof. Michael Gordon, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee –  Department of History  –  In a way – we have always had forms of public 
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ORSER-NYC - HistoricalArchaeology...

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