Chapter 6 Ferraro - Language is a symbolic way to view...

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What are arguments that language influences culture? Language is said to shape our thoughts and perceptions. The Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis was a test conducted to determine if linguistic structures caused people to view the world differently. The test concluded that we do in fact view the world differently because of different linguistic structures. We also use doublespeak to make things seem better and make people feel better about themselves. Language is also said to help determine our values which is part of one's culture. This helps us make decisions and ultimately shape our lives and what we do in them. Because of this connection it is rubbed off in English. This is because we place so much importance on individualism and personal privacy. Diglossia is when two different forms of the same language are spoken. This influences culture because a priest speaks differently then a teenager, and that influences the way they act also.
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Unformatted text preview: Language is a symbolic way to view things. It helps us develop our identities. Most languages have been passed down for many generations. Without a basic understanding of what other people are doing and saying there would not be technological advances like there are today. There are many different styles of language. How you talk and choose what words to say varies from culture to culture. Some cultures want to to just be completely straight forward and others "beat around the bush" when they speak. In some places being in your face and direct can get someone to buy your product, in other countries this would seem rude. It really just depends where you live and your cultural background. I felt this was an important chapter because it looks at how language can influence your culture even in the smallest way....
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This note was uploaded on 05/08/2011 for the course ANTH 101 taught by Professor Stephenson during the Fall '09 term at Ohio University- Athens.

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