Competition - Competition Many farmers (Fellow, n.d., p. 6)...

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Competition Many farmers (Fellow, n.d., p. 6) are unable to compete within a market where costs are continuously rising for the things they must buy to stay in business. Like the cost of seeds, fertilizer, and farm equipment, while the prices for the products they produce are kept low by the small number of processing companies who control the market. Farm crises are not a new event in farming, but market concentration, mergers, and vertical integration of food production are more recent, intensifying the economic inequality that saturates our society. The production farms owned by corporations have an advantage over the small family farmer. Large corporations (Fellow, n.d., p. 2) like Monsanto control 87% of the worlds the seed production and sell the seeds at lower prices to the large production farms which are owned by other corporations like Smithville and Cargill. Monsanto also produces and sells the most common fertilizers and pesticides used in farming. This means that farmers who are essentially
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This note was uploaded on 05/06/2011 for the course BUSINESS MBA 675 taught by Professor Studebaker during the Spring '11 term at Indiana Wesleyan.

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Competition - Competition Many farmers (Fellow, n.d., p. 6)...

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