c - Stress Introduction What is Stress? Normal Stress Units...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–8. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Stress Introduction What is Stress? Normal Stress Units
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Example Stress Calculations 0.1 inch Dia. Rod 1.0 inch Dia. Rod
Background image of page 2
Introduction to Stress - continued • Internal forces develop within objects due to external forces and moments applied to an object. • These internal forces are developed due to the stretching of numerous atomic bonds between atoms that make-up materials. • The average intensity of these internal forces is defined as the stress or force per unit area. • The internal force or stress developed in an object depends on the geometric characteristics of the object such as the cross-sectional area. • The type of material used to make the object also plays a role, since the stresses acting on the object can cause it to deflect, deform, or fracture.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Make an imaginary cut through a bar with an applied external force, P , to view the internal forces or stress acting within the bar. P P P
Background image of page 4
• The stress, σ , represents the intensity of the internal forces due to the action of the removed part of the bar. • The stress is continuously distributed over the entire cross-section. • The FBD can be used to show that the stress, σ , equals the external force, P , divided by the cross-sectional area, A . P
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Recall from Statics that a positive force acts in the positive direction with respect to a coordinate axis. x y Sign convention for stress using bars as examples A positive stress is due to tension and elongation due to applied forces. A negative stress is due to compression and shortening due to applied forces. P P P P P
Background image of page 6
External forces acting on an object cause a distribution of forces in the object. Determining this
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 8
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 05/07/2011 for the course 3ME WB1114 taught by Professor I.paraschiv during the Spring '08 term at Technische Universiteit Delft.

Page1 / 28

c - Stress Introduction What is Stress? Normal Stress Units...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 8. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online