cis562f10_note13_WebServices

cis562f10_note13_WebServices - Chapter 7 Web Services,...

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1 Chapter 7 Web Services, Semantic Web and Ontologies Reading: pp. 169 – 270 in Coursepack; Lecture Notes 1. Web Services • Definition — Software applications that can be discovered, described, and accessed based XML and standard Web protocols over intranet/internet — enable distributed computing on the Web using the text-based HTTP protocol — Web services consume and produce XML data — support integration and interoperability — E.g., a traveler can get services from the online reservation systems of an airline company and a car-rental company for a trip — Question: how to discover, describe and access?
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2 • Basic layers of Web services
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3 => the client application can automate interactions with Web services. SOAP — stands for Simple Object Access Protocol, defined by W3C. But this acronym has been revoked since it has nothing to do with OO programming. Some people suggested to use “Service-Oriented Architecture Protocol”, but no consent yet. — is the envelope syntax for sending and receiving XML messages with Web services receiving XML messages with Web services. (W3C: “a lightweight protocol for exchange of information in a decentralized, distributed environment”)
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4 — XML-based — is the underlying “plumbing” for Web services — The structure of a SOAP message looks like: Describe how data is encoded Wraps the message
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5 A client application sends the following SOAP request message to get the last trade price of the — An example: “DIS” stock ticker symbol: A Web service receives this information, processes the request in the SOAP body, and can return a SOAP response as follows: — Question: how an application knows the application-specific details? E.g., how to know to call GetLastTradePrice? How to understand the result?
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6 WSDL — stands for Web Service Definition Language (by W3C) — describe the communication details and the application-specific messages that can be sent in SOAP — Information to describe: where the service is located, what it does, how to invoke it. — XML-based, but isn’t intended to be human- readable. — Developers and integrators usually use toolkits to create WSDL 1. A Web service has a SOAP interface 2. The developer’s tools inspect the interface and generate a WSDL description 3. The client application looks at the WSDL description and generate the SOAP handler 4. The client application and the Web service can then communicate
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This note was uploaded on 05/07/2011 for the course CIS 550 taught by Professor Yoon,d during the Spring '08 term at University of Michigan-Dearborn.

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cis562f10_note13_WebServices - Chapter 7 Web Services,...

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