Lecture_12_-_Genetic_Relationships-1

Lecture_12_-_Genetic_Relationships-1 - Lecture 12 Lecture...

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Unformatted text preview: Lecture 12 Lecture 12 Genetic Genetic Relationships Relationships Among Individuals Among Individuals Types of Relatives Types of Relatives Being related means that two individuals have one or more common ancestors. Actually any two individuals in a species are related in a sense. If we trace their ancestry back through enough generations, we will find common ancestors. We usually think of related individuals as having more of their genes in common than individuals that are not related. Types of Relatives Types of Relatives From a genetic standpoint, being related means two individuals have a certain percentage of their genes in common, i.e., they both received part of their genes from a common ancestor. Another way to explain this is to say related individuals have more of their genes in common than two individuals randomly chosen from a population. Or, related individuals have more of their genes in common than the average of a population. Types of Relatives Types of Relatives There are two basic types of relatives in a population: collateral relatives and direct relatives . Collateral relatives are defined as two individuals who have one or more common ancestors but one is not a descendant of the other....
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This note was uploaded on 05/07/2011 for the course DARY 2072 taught by Professor Hay during the Spring '09 term at LSU.

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Lecture_12_-_Genetic_Relationships-1 - Lecture 12 Lecture...

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