Monitoring in Smart multi-Lane Torque Summed Electromechanical Actuators05334369

Monitoring in Smart multi-Lane Torque Summed Electromechanical Actuators05334369

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- 877 - Monitoring in Smart multi-Lane Torque Summed Electromechanical Actuators Fawaz Y. Annaz School of Electrical & Electronic Engineering, The University of Nottingham (Malaysia Campus), Malaysia (Tel: +60 3 8924 8363; email: Fawazannaz@gmail.com) Abstract: High integrity in multi-lane smart electromechanical actuation systems is achieved through hardware redundancy and intelligent monitoring. The main aim of this paper is to address cross-monitoring in Single-Type torque-summed architecture. The paper will consider hardware cross-monitoring, in three-phase equivalents that represent the brushless dc motor in this architecture, hence allowing for detailed motor and power conditioner failure related tests. The presented analysis is based around a 4-lane actuation system capable of driving aerodynamic and inertial loads (with 2 lanes failed) of an aileron control surface similar to that of the Sea Harrier. The paper will start by giving a brief history of major contributions to state of the art actuation systems. Then the paper will proceed in describing the lanes and the dedicated embed microprocessor/s performing control and comprehensive monitoring tasks. The paper will describe a hardware-cross monitoring technique evaluating local response to failures and their impact on the overall aircraft response in roll and roll rate. The paper will conclude that the current design meets the local and global system requirements. Keywords: Cross-monitoring, Electromechanical Actuator, Brushless DC Motor 1. INTRODUCTION Until recently, the common element in the development of flight control systems has been mainly restricted to hydraulic technology, for its proven reliability and the lack of alternative technologies. However, development of brushless dc motors (1964 by NASA) and recent developments in solid-state devices, rotor position sensing, and rare earth magnetic materials, electromechanical actuation systems became a realistic alternative. Some of the leading research and test programs are those initiated by Lockheed-Georgia and Sundstrand Corporation teamed together with the USAF Flight Dynamics Laboratory [1]-[6]. The objectives of these programs were to develop a new electromechanical actuator, evaluate its impact on flight control system design and demonstrate its capabilities in flight. The actuator consisted of a dual-motor device driving a single ball screw through a torque summing gearbox that drove the left-hand aileron on the C-141 aircraft. The electromechanical actuator system replaced the existing hydraulic actuator on the aileron, and it was monitored for over-speeding and over-travel. When a failure was detected, the faulty channel was isolated and the cockpit enunciators were illuminated. Servo protection was achieved by monitoring the input power and bridge voltages. The
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Monitoring in Smart multi-Lane Torque Summed Electromechanical Actuators05334369

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