Organic Chemistry(Topic 1 Introduction) - Introduction to...

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Introduction to Organic Chemistry Chapter 1 Introduction to organic chemistry Chemistry of carbon Class of organic compound Type of organic compound Formula of organic compound Classification of isomers Naming of organic compounds Type of organic reaction Application of organic compound
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INTRODUCTION TO ORGANIC CHEMISTRY Organic chemistry is a chemistry of carbon compounds. Example : methane, DNA, urea, DDT (insecticide), penicillin , nicotine, aspirin etc. . But not all carbon compounds are organics. Example : carbonate (CO 3 2- ; cyanide (CN - ), bicarbonate (HCO 3 - ), carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide.
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(Ammonium cyanate) (Friedrich Wohler) 1828
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Organic compound Substances derived from living organisms and contain “Vital Force.” Example: nutrients (carbohydrates), fuels, fabrics (nylon), wood. Inorganic compound Substances that are not or have not been part of a living organism, and therefore do not contain “Vital Force.” Example: sodium chloride (salt), carbon dioxide (CO 2 )
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Usually nonflammable Often flammable Flammability Soluble Insoluble Solubility in water Conductor Nonconductor Conductivity Fast and simple Slow and complex Rate of chemical reaction Usually high- melting-point solids. Gases, liquids or low- melting-point solids. Normal physical state Quite strong (Electrostatic force) Generally weak (Intermolecular force) Forces between molecules Often ionic Usually covalent Bonding with molecule Inorganic compound Organic compound Property Properties of typical organic and inorganic compound
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Position of Carbon
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Information in the table 6 C Carbon 12.01 • Atomic number • Name of the element • Elemental symbol • Atomic mass (weight)
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Importance of Carbon Basic for all life • Form stable covalent bonds to other carbon atoms – catenation • Can form single, double, triple bonds • Long carbon chain can be produced • Will bond to many other element • A huge number of chemicals are posibble
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For healthy growth and functioning. From food Vitamins Example : A,B Complex, C, D, E and K To store energy. From animals and vegetables Fats and Oils Example : a) Triglyceride b) Paraffin Oils c) Almond Oils a) As a structural materials. b) As a biological catalyst and regulators. From animals Proteins Example : a) Enzymes b) Hormones Usage Origin Name Of Organic Compounds Naturally Occurred Organic Compounds
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Give colour to the material. Methylene blue Dyes To kill houseflies and other insects. Dichlorodiphenyl
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This note was uploaded on 05/08/2011 for the course ACCOUNTING 121210 taught by Professor Sdasdas during the Spring '10 term at Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences.

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Organic Chemistry(Topic 1 Introduction) - Introduction to...

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