CAPSIM Example - Page 1 Use of a management simulation in a...

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Unformatted text preview: Page 1 Use of a management simulation in a financial accounting class A description of a tool to teach financial accounting The purpose of this paper is to describe my experience using the Foundation simulation from Management Simulations, Inc. 1 in my MBA financial accounting class. I will discuss why simulations are effective teaching devices, why I chose the Foundation simulation, how I used the simulation in my class, what I think it accomplished, what its limitations were, and how the students reacted. Why simulations are effective teaching devices I believe that we learn by doing. After all, experience is said to be the best teacher. Cognitive science characterizes learning as the process of rearranging information in long-term memory. According to Dale (1969) after two weeks we remember 90% of what we do and only 20% of what we hear and 10% of what we read, as Exhibit 1 displays. Exhibit 1 Cone of Learning adapted from (Dale, 1969) 1 Management Simulations, Inc. 540 W. Frontage Rd. Suite 3270 Northfield, IL 60093-1235 http://www.capsim.com/ 888-472-7554 Reading 10% of what we read Hearing Words 20% of what we hear Looking at Pictures 30% of what we see Watching a Movie Looking at an Exhibit Watching a Demonstration Watching a Demonstration Passive Seeing it done on Location 50% of what we hear and see Participating in a Discussion Giving a Talk 70% of what we say Doing a Dramatic Presentation Simulating the Real Experience Active Doing the Real Thing 90% of what we say and do Nature of Involvement After 2 weeks we tend to remember Cone of Learning Reading 10% of what we read Hearing Words 20% of what we hear Looking at Pictures 30% of what we see Watching a Movie Looking at an Exhibit Watching a Demonstration Watching a Demonstration Passive Seeing it done on Location 50% of what we hear and see Participating in a Discussion Giving a Talk 70% of what we say Doing a Dramatic Presentation Simulating the Real Experience Active Doing the Real Thing 90% of what we say and do Nature of Involvement After 2 weeks we tend to remember Cone of Learning Page 2 How do we learn? The mind imposes structure on the information available from experience. Learning is the process of continuously modifying that information in the mind. Therefore, one of the primary differences between the novice and the expert is the manner in which information is organized and utilized. (National Research Council, 2000) One major tenet of cognitive theory is that learners actively construct their knowledge by trying to connect new information with their prior knowledge. Learning starts with what students currently understand and know about a topic and builds from there. Learning is a process of continuously modifying knowledge and skills. (National Research Council, 2001) The National Research Council states that conscious human thought involves ordering and rearranging ideas in working memory, the currently active portion of long-term memory. People organize disparate bits of information into chunks or groupings that make sense to them. organize disparate bits of information into chunks or groupings that make sense to them....
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CAPSIM Example - Page 1 Use of a management simulation in a...

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