Overby 3.1 - Kevin Overby Feeder 3.1 Professor Mulligan...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Kevin Overby Feeder 3.1 Professor Mulligan English 102 Close Reading In his poem Punishment, Seamus Heaney illustrates an image of a womans body that has been drowned in a bog. Heaneys upbringing and devotion to Ireland acts as a backdrop behind much of his workNeeds a transition between these two unrelated ideas. Comment on his appropriation and identification with her body. What does this identification mean? Is Heaney too a victim? Is Heaney too an aggressor? Its I almost love younot I love youwhy the hesitation? Is his pity genuine or is he just using her body for the purposes of his allegory? Redundant sentence deleted. Citation? Good. YES. THANK YOU. !! Seriously, Kevin!? Do you agree with him? Does his ambivalence make you angry? Finish with a bang, What are the larger implications of this allegory? Are we as readers implicated too? Would we too stand dumb and watch the woman in the bog get hung or the Catholic women tarred? Arent Intimate revenges and betrayals from our family and our community the worst and most pernicious kind? Does his indictment lose trenchancy in the face of his own inaction? How do you feel? CM . Upon first reading, it may be difficult to extract the social commentary that Heaney offers regarding the British occupation in Northern Ireland where he grew up. However, certain references made by the poet make it evident that Punishment not only describes the corpse of one young woman, but also serves as an allusion to a larger conflict regarding the punishment of Irish Catholic women who fell in love with British soldiers, as well as the response to this punishment. The first five stanzas act to describe the drowned corpse of a young woman in a bog. Heaney uses very dark imagery throughout the description of the discovery of this young girl. Her shaved head like a stubble of black corn, her blindfold a soiled bandage (17-19) offers the reader with a description of the treatment that this woman received. It was a harsh punishment, yet we still do not know what for. It is also evident that the writer finds this girl beautiful, which is rather contrary to common associations with corpses rotting in wet bogs. Your tar-black face was beautiful, My poor scapegoat (27- 28). Not only does the writer view this body as beautiful, but he also feels a personal attachment to it. From the beginning of the poem, the speaker has illustrated his association with the poor scapegoat. He starts by stating that he can feel the tug of the association with the poor scapegoat....
View Full Document

Page1 / 8

Overby 3.1 - Kevin Overby Feeder 3.1 Professor Mulligan...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online